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CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS

Glass art, history, science, and design.

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Fun Fact

Tumblr paired up with Humans of New York to raise money for Hurricane Sandy relief.

cmog·a day agoPhoto

We’re closing out our celebration Women’s History Month with this sculpture from designer Marie Kirschner! Like many of her contemporaries, Kirschner aimed to create interiors with a unified aesthetic. To achieve this, she designed furniture, pottery, embroidery, lighting, and glass.

Blumenbaum (Flower Tree), Marie Kirschner (designer), Johann Lötz Witwe (manufacturer), designed in 1904. 2009.3.57.

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cmog·a day agoPhoto

For most of his career, Bell was especially interested in the precise  and beguiling ways in which the surface of glass reflects light. In the last  few years, however, he has extended his interest to the way mass and diffuse  color operate alongside surface to shift viewers’ perceptions of an interior  form. In VFZ 1, recently added to the Museum’s collection, large-scale sheets  of glass are laminated around colored cores of PET film and plastic interlay to create two monumental nested forms. Combined in this way, the two forms  create a suggestive, subtly modulated interior space.

VFZ 1, Larry Bell, Venice and Van Nuys, California, 2017. Purchased in part with special funds provided by Corning Incorporated in honor of the opening of the Contemporary Art + Design Wing, March 2015. 2018.4.13. 

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cmog·2 days agoPhoto

The Rakow Library is lucky to have digitized Marvin Lipofsky’s  photographs documenting the Studio Glass Movement. Here, you can see Lino  Tagliapietra, Martin Blank, and Ben Moore working at Chihuly Studio in  Seattle. Learn more about this archive on our blog.

Lino Tagliapietra, Martin Blank and Ben Moore at Chihuly Studio, Seattle, WA, Photo by Marvin Lipofsky, © Marvin Lipofsky, Collection of the Rakow Research Library, The Corning Museum of Glass, CMGL 151356.

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cmog·5 days agoPhoto

Kimiake Higuchi is one of the most celebrated contemporary artists working in pâte de verre. Meaning “glass paste,” pâte de verre is a kiln-forming technique that combines fine glass powder with a binder that creates a paste that can be shaped in a variety of ways.

Narcissus Vase, Kimiake Higuchi, Tochigi, Japan, 1993. Gift of Dale and Doug Anderson. 2009.6.5.

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cmog·7 days agoPhoto

In the middle of the Great Depression, all eyes were on Corning, New York as Corning Glass Works began casting the 200-inch disk on this day in 1934. At the time, this disk was the largest piece of glass ever created. The first casting failed when supports fell in the mold during the casting process and that original cast has been on display at the Museum ever since we opened in 1951.

Worker strips the ladle to remove excess glass, 1934. Dr. Clyde Hostetter collection on the 200” disk, CMGL 119815.

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cmog·7 days agoPhoto

Object of the Week: Frog and Lily Platter, Evan Englund, Orrefors Glasbruk, Orrefors, Sweden, 1978. 80.3.11. 

This stunning platter was created using the graal technique developed by Orrefors of Sweden in 1916. The design was carved, engraved, or etched on a bubble of cooled, colored glass which was then reheated, covered in colorless glass, and inflated and spun out into a platter.

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cmog·8 days agoPhoto

We’re sending you a bouquet of flowers today, courtesy of this window from John La Farge. Trained as a painter, La Farge was the first designer to use opalescent glass in windows, which became a hallmark of windows by Louis Comfort Tiffany and other American stained glass manufacturers.

Window, John La Farge (maker), Donald MacDonald (maker), probably Thomas Wright (maker), Jamaica Plain, Boston, Massachusetts, United States, about 1897. 93.4.18.

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cmog·11 days agoPhoto

We’re commemorating National Fragrance Day with this delightful cameo scent bottle. Jules Barbe gilded glass by dissolving powdered glass in a wet paste and painting it onto the surface of the glass. Then, the glass was fired in a kiln and burnished with spun glass fibers.

Cameo Scent Bottle with Fruit, possibly John Goffe & Sons (manufacturer), Thomas Webb and Sons(manufacturer), probably Jules Barbe (gilder), probably Fridolin Kretschman (engraver and painter), Amblecote, England, about 1880-1890, silver done in 1888. Gift of the Ennion Society. 2016.2.7.

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cmog·12 days agoPhoto

Our galleries are full of conservation stories! This ancient Roman plate was glued back together and the missing parts were reconstructed with clay. Then the conservators made a mold of the entire reconstructed plate with silicone rubber. The silicone mold was then used to cast an epoxy into the missing areas. The total treatment took 29 hours over 22 days. Learn more about conservation in our galleries in this blog post.

Plate, Egypt or Rome, 225-100 B.C. 66.1.35.

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cmog·13 days agoPhoto

We’re bringing the flowers to you to celebrate the first day of spring. This drawing was made by Rudolf Blaschka as a reference for life-size models he would create out of flameworked glass. See how he detailed the pollen in yellow and the stem in green. Don’t miss the faint pencil sketch he made in the lower righthand corner!

[Untitled drawing of flower] [art original], Rudolf Blaschka, 1892-1895. CMGL 130336.

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cmog·14 days agoPhoto

The Museum may be closed, but we’re continuing our celebration of Women’s History Month online! The fruits in this Still Life by Flora C. Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick include a pear, an unripe apple, an Italian prune plum, a lemon, a tangelo, a red apple, a greengage plum, and a peach. Can you find each fruit in this image?

Still Life with Two Plums, Flora C. Mace and Joey Kirkpatrick, Seattle, Washington, United States, 2000. Gift in part of the artists. 2002.4.2.

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cmog·24 days agoPhoto

Astrid van Giffen from conservation and Andy Fortune from photography have been working together to capture UV photography of some pieces in our Asian Glass collection. When viewed under ultraviolet irradiation (UV), some materials fluoresce, or glow in distinctive ways. Glass does not always fluoresce, but if it does it may tell us something about its composition. See some of the pictures we captured and find out what we learned about snowflake glass in our latest blog post about our work with Dr. Shelly Xue to uncover the mysteries of snowflake glass.

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cmog·24 days agoPhoto

We’re celebrating International Women’s Day by continuing our look at 5 women artists during Women’s History Month! This vase was designed by Suzanne Lalique in 1925 for the famous glass and jewelry company, Lalique. 

Nanking, Suzanne Lalique (designer), Lalique et Cie (manufacturer), possibly Wingen-sur-Moder or Combs-la-Ville, France, designed in 1925. Gift of Elaine and Stanford Steppa. 2001.3.351.

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cmog·a month agoPhoto

Object of the Week: Apothecary’s Coffer, possibly France or Switzerland, 1700-1725. 2009.3.77. 

This unusual wooden box has compartments containing 10 glass bottles with metal screw tops, two metal jars with tops, and a pewter syringe. It would have been used by a traveling pharmacist or by a doctor on house calls. The glass bottles in such a set contained liquid solutions for application or ingestion, while the pewter bottles held creams or pastilles. The bottles remind us of the importance of glass in hygiene and medicine. Glass containers were not subject to corrosion or to the contamination of their contents. They could thus remain sterile, and they could be tightly sealed.

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cmog·a month agoPhoto

It’s Women’s History Month and the National Museum of Women in the Arts has challenged museums around the world to feature 5 women artists throughout the month of March! We’re kicking off our celebration with this stained glass piece by Judith Schaehcter. 

She uses the traditional stained glass techniques of cutting, staining, and layering for her narrative images. Her contemporary and sometimes disturbing subjects reflect events that, through the news media, have become commonplace in our lives, such as domestic violence and natural disasters. Schaechter’s Punk/Gothic style recalls the anxious yet beautiful figures of medieval art, as well as modern German Expressionist painting. You can see this panel on view in “The Path to Paradise: Judith Schaehcter’s Stained-Glass Art” at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester through May 24. 

Caught in a Flood, Judith Schaechter, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 1990. 91.4.23.

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cmog·a month agoPhoto

Today at The Studio, flameworkers gathered to make beads for Beads of Courage, a nonprofit that gives beads out to children living with chronic illnesses. We were also honored to welcome two recipients of Beads of Courage, Hawkinz and Mavis!

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