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germanpostwarmodern · an hour ago
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Französische Schule (1953) in Landau, Germany, by Johannes Krahn
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germanpostwarmodern · 14 hours ago
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Church “Christkönig” (1964) in Waldkraiburg, Germany, by Franz Xaver Gärtner
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germanpostwarmodern · 18 hours ago
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Church St Martin (1966-67) in Germering, Germany, by Hubert Gais
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house-ad · 2 months ago
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germanpostwarmodern · a day ago
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Michaëlkerk (1962-63) in Spijkenisse, the Netherlands, by Rein Fledderus
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germanpostwarmodern · a day ago
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Extension (1983) of the Town Hall in Manching, Germany, by Max Breitenhuber
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germanpostwarmodern · a day ago
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Bistrup Church (1978) in Hjørring, Denmark, by Holger Jensen
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germanpostwarmodern · 2 days ago
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Row-Houses (1953) in Hannover, Germany, by Peter Hübotter & Rolf Romero
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germanpostwarmodern · 2 days ago
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Concert Hall “Vredenburg” (1973-78) in Utrecht, the Netherlands, by Herman Hertzberger
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germanpostwarmodern · 2 days ago
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Gadelius House (1961) in Lidingö, Sweden, by Ralph Erskine
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germanpostwarmodern · 2 days ago
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Often likened to Peter Eisenman it was also the latter who acknowledged him as a forerunner of Deconstructivism: Hiromi Fujii (*1935), the Japanese master of the grid which in the 1960s and 1970s put him on the map of American and European architects and researchers. Fujii, who studied at Waseda University and later worked with Angelo Mangiarotti and the Smithsons, in his buildings very much aligned with the minimalist artists in his quest for an architecture without historical significations. With his grid-based designs Fujii developed highly geometricized, nested spaces that followed a stringent program derived from the requirements of the respective typologies, e.g. the single-family home. An important book on the architect is the Kenneth Frampton-edited volume „The Architecture of Hiromi Fujii“, published in 1987 by Rizzoli, that brings together both Fujii’s texts and works. Rather than focusing on the somewhat confused introductory text by Frampton readers are well-advised to stick with Fujii’s texts and buildings: his concrete boxes that stack cube within cube are reminiscent of Sol LeWitt’s structures and with them the architect sought to plant their pure forms in the spectators’ consciousness. At the same time one can very much read the design and construction process that, although based on box and grid, shows an interesting variation of a very elemental form.
„The Architecture of Hiromi Fujii“ is a slender volume that provides a first introduction to the work of a lesser-known yet by virtue of his conceptual approach singular architect. What the book lacks is contextualization since the book’s authors solely view Fujii through the eyes of Western culture rather than seeking out analogies with Japanese architecture and culture. 
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house-ad · 2 months ago
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germanpostwarmodern · 3 days ago
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Landesgirokasse Am Bollwerk (1992-97) in Stuttgart, Germany, by Behnisch, Behnisch & Partner
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germanpostwarmodern · 3 days ago
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House Colnaghi-Abt (1927) in Riehen, Switzerland, by Hans Schmidt & Paul Artaria
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germanpostwarmodern · 3 days ago
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Villa “Casa Blanca” (1929) in Houthem, the Netherlands, by F.P.J. (Frits) Peutz
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germanpostwarmodern · 4 days ago
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Casa da Rua Sant Cruz (1927-28) in São Paulo, Brazil, by Gregori Warchavchik
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germanpostwarmodern · 4 days ago
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House Parpart (1970) in Geleen, the Netherlands, by Wolfram Grundhoff
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germanpostwarmodern · 4 days ago
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Kesler House (1953-54) in Pacific Palisades, CA, USA, by Richard Neutra. Photo by Julius Shulman.
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germanpostwarmodern · 4 days ago
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Bonn, the former capital of Germany, has often been criticized as being provincial and too little distinguished, also architecture-wise. Today this judgement has to be revised as buildings by e.g. Egon Eiermann, Sep Ruf or Hans Schwippert especially by virtue of their modesty and timeless modernity have gained almost unanimous appreciation. But the architecture of the „Bonn Republic“ went way beyond the borders of the city: embassies, buildings for administrative bodies and German schools in foreign countries transported the values of a democratized Germany. In her very comprehensive book „Bauten des Bundes 1949–1989. Zwischen Architekturkritik und zeitgenössischer Wahrnehmung“, published by Dom Publishers in 2019, Elisabeth Plessen provides an all-encompassing analysis of the German state architecture between 1949 and 1989. This goes far beyond a collection of buildings (which the book also includes) but instead is a cultural and reception history that also digs into the contemporary discourses surrounding German architecture: based on ten exemplary building, among them the 1970s Kanzleramt, Plessen recounts how press and public received and/or criticized contemporary state architecture. A particularly polarized discussion was sparked by the Chancellor Bungalow by Sep Auf, completed in 1964, that especially the broader public regarded as spartan and unrepresentative. But, as the author shows, this very building quintessentially represented the architecture of the Federal Republic: modern, restrained and without any signs of grandiosity. Through Plessen’s thorough catalogue of buildings, that also includes a description of their current state, one can easily follow the development of these design precepts and how they developed along the changing architectural currents. Consequently „Bauten des Bundes“ undoubtedly is a reference work that provides an in-depth analysis of the architectural appearance of postwar Germany, how it relates to German history and above all how the public received it. A must-read book for both historians and architectural historians! 
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house-ad · a month ago
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