great-and-small
great-and-small
All Creatures Great and Small
This is the place where I post pictures of all the remarkable animals I encounter in my life. I am a vet student, rookie biologist, enthusiastic squirrel rehabber, and I volunteer at a wolf preserve when I have free time. I research wild horses and love to talk about it! I post lots of squirrels, gerbils, dogs, cats, wolves, and occasionally cool bones. I reblog lots of interesting or silly biology stuff. My main is https://fancyskink.tumblr.com/
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great-and-small · 13 hours ago
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great-and-small · 15 hours ago
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@nekonotaishou His color is so weird, right?? Lol I think the official term for this coloration is “chinchilla” with white trim, but I’m not certain. Here’s a pic of him before he jumped in a pool, looking at least slightly less rat-like
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Seems I won’t rest until I’ve collected the most gremlin-like dogs on the planet, so I’m very excited to add this creature to my pack. I’ve decided to name this little goblin Fox!
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great-and-small · 19 hours ago
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Seems I won’t rest until I’ve collected the most gremlin-like dogs on the planet, so I’m very excited to add this creature to my pack. I’ve decided to name this little goblin Fox!
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great-and-small · a day ago
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Chiming in to agree that this looks like a husky (not a malamute) and unfortunately it’s definitely morbidly obese as well. I think part of the problem for people in the notes is that their perception of a “normal” dog is warped by the prevalence of obesity among American pets. When all you see is overweight pets, you can start to think a dog that looks like this is normal, or even that it is the breed standard.
If your dog looks like the husky in this video, please please consult with your veterinarian about your pet’s weight and work together to make a healthy weight loss plan. You will spare your friend so much pain and suffering by keeping them trim, and you’ll likely be able to enjoy much more time together by improving longevity. That’s a win-win for everyone involved!
The first meeting 
(Source)
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great-and-small · a day ago
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Yes to all of these, especially the bit about connecting with people! I told a woman her dog was handsome enough to be on a dog food bag and she was so touched she included that comment in the family Christmas letter. I love getting to see the love and joy that people share with their pets, and I really feel that connection and empathy are a big part of practicing good medicine!
In honor of one year in the field, here are some things I’ve learned from veterinary assisting: 
–75% of the people who have german shepherds probably shouldn’t have german shepherds.
 –Cat people are a lot more willing to be honest about their pet’s temperament than dog people
. –Too many men don’t neuter their non-breeding male dogs because they see it as a threat to their own masculinity, which is just wild to me.
 –People will jump to all kinds of conclusions about their pet’s past based on normal fear behaviors, so that they can feel like saviors. 
–Sometimes the humans are more upset about the needles than their animals are. 
–We need some kind of animal education program in schools so that people can learn basic dog and cat body language. Pets are everywhere in America, now more than ever, and we need to make sure the public understands how to interact with them so that no one gets hurt.
–Often, people’s expectations of their pets in the overstimulating environment of a clinic are too high.
 –As a veterinary professional with the relevant experience and training, it’s easy to judge people’s pet care decisions. But empathy will get you a lot farther than judgement.
 –Hunting hounds are often the sweetest and softest of dogs. 
–Kittens at their very first visit are the most likely to go nuclear. 
–People will see our scrubs and our competence, and be overcome with the desire to prove their knowledge to us. 
–No one understands how boosters or parasite prevention work. 
–Everyone wants to do what’s best for their pet, and everyone has a different definition of “what’s best”. 
–Having a DVM does not make someone an expert in behavior, unless that’s their specialty. Some vets have absolutely whack ideas about dog training.
 –Veterinarians who started out as assistants or technicians are the best to work with. 
–Most veterinarians, if they could go back and pick again, would not choose to become veterinarians, which is extremely depressing. This is a problem we need to address if we want to have enough vets in the future.
–Animals are an amazing way to connect with other humans: I’ve never seen someone’s face light up as fast as when I compliment their cat’s cute markings or their dog’s adorable ears. 
–You will be miserable in this field if you don’t like people, and you’ll burn out quickly if you don’t try to find a little bit of good in everyone. Some days that’s easier, some days it feels impossible.
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great-and-small · 2 days ago
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the whole “alpha male” thing is so funny because like. one scientist was like “hey i noticed this thing in wolves” are people were like “cool. that applies to humans too and a whole bunch of people who seem to be acting seriously are going to construct an entire psychosocial hierarchy around it” and the scientist is like “hang on wait i actually think i was wrong. about the wolves”
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great-and-small · 2 days ago
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I 100% agree that some of the commentary regarding these insects is needlessly vitriolic, as it’s never the fault of the animal for thriving in a foreign environment! With that said though, I do personally feel that their presence here in the states is worrisome for ecological reasons as well as agricultural. I think that whenever any invasive species is isolated in a new place we should err on the side of caution regarding management of these species to protect native ecosystems. Although the economic and agricultural impacts of such an infestation garner more attention and funding, this doesn’t always mean the ecological impact is negligible. In the case of the spotted lanternfly specifically, though it’s certainly true that the agricultural impact of the insect is much more established, there is also cause for real concern regarding our native ecosystems!
Last year, a study (Worldwide Feeding Host Plants of Spotted Lanternfly, With Significant Additions From North America) out of the journal Environmental Entomology set out to explore the dietary habits of these bugs. This article was written by Lawrence Barringer, an entomologist who has studied these bugs since their arrival in the U.S. in 2014. This study found that lanternflies indeed feed on many plants with relevance outside of the agricultural sector. Though they are generalists, they still represent a real threat to native plant species should they gain a foothold here in the states. Here’s an excerpt from the article I’m referencing!
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I really believe that we as humans are stewards of our native ecosystems, and have a responsibility to rectify the damages we have caused as much as possible, and unfortunately this often includes management and eradication of invasive species. However, there is absolutely no reason we cannot treat these animals humanely, and with the respect they deserve!
Here's a reminder to kill this fucker with no hesitation if you see them!
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great-and-small · 2 days ago
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Perusing my field guide while waiting for the rain to let up (I just wanna go birding pls) so enjoy these truly terrible jokes
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great-and-small · 3 days ago
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This species is a huge threat to ecosystems all over the United States. I hate to kill a bug but if I see this species I’ll do it quickly and humanely as possible, and report the sighting to the proper authorities! Here are some tips from the USDA on how to help minimize lanternfly infestation
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Here's a reminder to kill this fucker with no hesitation if you see them!
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great-and-small · 3 days ago
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Catch me wearing this around town to find the other macroalgae enthusiasts
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great-and-small · 3 days ago
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Meerkats, Suricata suricatta (1773-1780) - Robert Jacob Gordon
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great-and-small · 4 days ago
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fake horse adventures
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great-and-small · 4 days ago
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great-and-small · 4 days ago
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Animal of the Day!
Largetooth Sawfish (Pristis pristis)
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(Photo from Simon Fraser University)
Conservation Status- Critically Endangered
Habitat- Indo-Pacific Ocean
Size (Weight/Length)- 600 kg; 7.5 m
Diet- Crustaceans; Fish
Cool Facts- At first glance, you might think that the largetooth sawfish is a massive species of shark with an intimidating weapon. Instead, they are a large species of ray that eat shrimp and crabs. They tend to live in shallow water where they cruise along the bottom, looking for food. They use their long ‘saw’ on their face to stir up the bottom to pull out crustaceans or to stun fish. Despite the fact that largetooth sawfish is primarily found in the ocean, it is known for being able to live in fresh water rivers as well. Largetooth sawfish are poached for their meat and their snout, along with accidentally being entangled in fishing nets.
Rating- 11/10 (Sadly, not a chainsaw.)
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great-and-small · 5 days ago
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twitter / instagram
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great-and-small · 5 days ago
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Check out these wild Caribou I spotted running briskly along a hilltop in Denali National park! Caribou are the only cervid species where both the male and female individuals grow and shed antlers seasonally. Seeing them in the wild was seriously amazing! One fun fact about the caribou, (and it’s domestic counterpart the reindeer) is that while males shed their antlers in November, the females will bear those impressive racks all the way through the winter until they calf in May. You know what that means? Since all of Santa’s reindeer are depicted as still bearing antlers in December, the whole sleigh team (including Rudolph) must be made up of female animals! You go girls 🦌🎄
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