Tumgir
lichenaday · a day ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Cystocoleus ebeneus
Velvet Lichen 
I really wish velvet would come back in style in a big way. Maybe we could start by making C. ebeneus an icon in its own right! This filamentous lichen grows in dense mats wiry or hair-like, brown-black hyphae. These fungal hyphae surround even smaller filaments of trentepholia algae. It grows on siliceous rock overhangs and vertical surfaces in boreal and cool-temperate habitats in the northern hemisphere.  
images: source | source | source
info: source | source
60 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Pseudosagedia guentheri
Is that tar? Mud? Old gum? No silly, it’s a lichen! A symbiotic association between a fungi and an algae! That’s a whole ecosystem you are looking at, so show it some respect! P. guentheri is a crustose lichen with a dark gray, brown, or green thallus and black perithecia. It grows on siliceous rock near water in montane, subalpine, and subarctic habitats. And why does it look like this, when some lichens get to look, well, flashier? Well it grows on rocks that are frequently inundated with water, and so having a smooth thallus that water can’t erode is a must! And that dark coloration likely helps it respond to the light and desiccation changes brought on by drying. So it looks perfect for exactly what it is. 
images: source | source
info: source
27 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 3 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Bulbothrix confoederata
Smooth eyelash lichen
She’s watching you . . .
images: source | source
64 notes · View notes
house-ad · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media
32K notes · View notes
lichenaday · 4 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Lecidea fuscoatra
When looking at a lichen that looks just like a million other lichens to the naked eye, how are you supposed to tell them apart? Spot testing! Spot testing involves using chemicals dropped onto sections of the thallus and observing any color changing reaction. The three diluted chemical solutions most commonly used contain potassium hydroxide (K-test), calcium hypochlorite/bleach (C-test), and para-phenylenediamine (P-test). You can also do a KC test with a drop of K solution followed by a drop of C. Here’s what L. fuscoatra looks like following C, K, and KC spot tests: 
Tumblr media
Pretty distinctive color change, right? Well that C positive reaction, K negative reaction, and KC positive reaction is indicative of the species, and helps to discern it from look-alikes like  Miriquidica deusta and Immersaria athroocarpa which display no reaction to C or K. Pretty neat, huh? 
images: source | source | source
info: source | source
72 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 5 days ago
Text
I would just like to warn my followers that as tempting as it is, this is how you get ticks. Do I speak from personal experience? Absolutely.
Tumblr media
2K notes · View notes
lichenaday · 7 days ago
Note
THIS IS WHAT I'VE BEEN TRYING TO TELL Y'ALL
got into lichen this year and it's fantastic you just go outside and look at surfaces and there's little guys on there. they're hard to identify but it's fun to just notice them you know? and a lichen doesn't care what we've got going on, it's just growing on a cool rock and it doesn't care if it's a building or a statue or whatever it's all Surfaces. love them
you're so right the world is marvelous
306 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 7 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Parmotrema xanthinum
Madagascar ruffle lichen
For a long time, I was one of those no pink, no sparkles, no sequins, and absolutely NO RUFFLES kinda girls (unless we are talking about the cheddar and sour cream chip variety). But as I have matured I have realized that denying myself the pleasures of traditionally feminine things didn’t make me any cooler than other girls, and that things like pink and glitter and ruffles don’t belong to any one gender. Just look at P. xanthium, in all its ruffled glory, not ascribing to any forced gender stereotypes. This foliose lichen has a pale yellow-green upper surface and a brown-black lower surface, and cylindrical, ciliate isidia. It is rare, only growing on rock and cacti in  neotropical regions of the Americas, Asia, and Africa. 
images: source | source | source
info: source
94 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 9 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Letrouitia domingensis
This crustose lichen has a thallus that varies in texture from smooth to verrucose (wart-like), and color from green-yellow to pale yellow to yellow-orange. It has roundish apothecia with a distinctive orange-yellow margin, and red-brown to brown black apothecial disc. And what is in these apothecia? Have you been following this account for a while wondering what the fuck an apothecia is? It’s a fruiting body produced by the fungal constituent of the lichen symbiosis that releases the spores that will grow into new lichens (if they are able to pair up with photobiont partner). So contained within those apothecia are long tubes (asci) filled lil bb fungi. And in L. domingensis, the lil babies look like this: 
Tumblr media
Aren’t they so cute??? I love them. So once they are expelled, these spores will colonize the bark of tropical and subtropical trees. And grow up to be just as adorable as they were in their infancy. 
images: source | source | source | source
info: source | source
44 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 11 days ago
Photo
Not moss--lichen!
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Forest of mossy dead looking trees on Little Quilcene trail. by bikejr
10K notes · View notes
lichenaday · 12 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Xanthomendoza fallax
Hooded sunburst lichen
images: source | source | source
99 notes · View notes
house-ad · 2 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
63K notes · View notes
lichenaday · 13 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Byssoloma leucoblepharum
Your vision isn’t off, those margins around the apothecia are FUZZY! B. leucoblepharum is a crustose lichen with a thin gray-green or brown-green thallus. It has round, flat apothecia 0.3-0.5 mm in diameter. These apothecia have discs that start out pale orange, and darken to brown-black with age. These discs are surrounded in a margin of pale, cottony fungal hyphae. B. leucoblepharum can be found in temperate and tropical oceanic forests growing on the surface of bark or long-lasting leaves. 
images: source | source
info: source
93 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 14 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Punctelia stictica
Lichen fact: lichens don’t get goosebumps. Figured I’d mention that, since you might think so while looking at P. stictica. No, those little bumps allover the thallus surface are pseudocyphellae--holes in the outer cortex where the inner medullary layer made up of fungal hyphae is visible. These pores are thought to help with gas exchange, and are an ID characteristic for lichens in the  Parmeliaceae family. This particular porous pal can be found growing on rocks in temperate to boreal habitats all over the world. 
images: source | source | source | source
info: source | source | source
60 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 15 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Lecanora sierrae
Sierra rim lichen
You know those weird, poignant memories that stick out in our head for no particular reason? One of mine is waking up on the choir bus driving over the Sierra Nevada mountains. It was a bus of like, 50+ teenagers and it was probably around 2 AM, and it was dead quiet. I had been passed out on the floor and I woke up and looked out the window at the walls of snow on either side of the road, and the stars overhead, and it was so cold and still. It was a weird, wired sort of peace, surrounded by sleeping bodies in this beautiful, frozen world gliding gently past. Looking at the absolutely stunning L. sierrae and reading its name reminded me of that moment, and I was back there once again. Lichens may appear as frozen in time as that memory, but really they are  in constant motion, moving and changing and growing and adapting to the world around them--just like I did, going from awkward choir kid to awkward lichen scientist! It may be at a slower pace than us, but that doesn’t mean we should overlook their existence! Like, you may notice that the thallus coloration of L. sierrae varies in these pictures from brown to light green to bluish. They bluish color is actually indicative of an accumulation of copper and selenium in its thallus from nearby mining operations! Providing us with an environmental indicator of heavy metal pollution. A memory of the past actions of humans splashed across its surface, changed by each and every experience it has. Like us. 
images: source | source 
info: source | source
74 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 16 days ago
Note
Maybe not quite your purview, but do you have any thoughts on lichen-based dyes like orchil? I got into the rabbithole when I was a wee textile hobbyist, but I was wondering if it’s a topic getting focus in more biology-focused circles
Ooo yes! An interesting topic! I am new to the lichen textile world, but I have OPINIONS. Most of which I got from reading Lichen Dyes: The New Source Book by Karen Diadick Casselman, which I highly recommend to anyone interested in lichen textile dyes.
tl;dr: I support salvage harvesting, where only lichens that are detached from the substrate, and/or are likely to be damaged/destroyed by human activity are collected and used for dying. This is difficult with the scarcity/longevity of lichens used for orchil and other purple dyes. But if you can find it, I think using them to dye textiles it is a great way to spread awareness of lichens and how incredible they are!
For those who don't know, orchil is one of many names for a purple dye derived from ammonia prepared lichens--mainly Roccella in the Mediterranean. Other purple producing lichens mainly used in northern Europe include Ochrolechia (aka cudbear, kork, or korkje) and Lasallia/Umbilicaria (aka orsallia). Purple dye itself dates back to neolithic times, and can also be made using the crushed bodies of marine gastropods (murex), and the crushed shells of arthropods (kermes). Purple dying likely originated in eastern or central Asia, and spread to Europe following the crusades. People have been using orchil for a long time, with the oldest recorded recipe for lichen-derived purple dye found on the Papyrus Graecus Holmiensis dating to the 3rd century AD Egypt. The recipe is written in Greek, which already speaks to it’s widespread use across cultures. And if you know anything about history, you might know that people went nuts for purple. Absolutely loved those purple textiles. They were used to signify wealth, rank, and royalty, since that purple color could only come from laborious and painstaking processes of collecting, grinding, and ammonia fixing of tiny mollusks, bugs, or lichens. Lichens were the least difficult of these organisms to collect, since they, you know, hold still, and don’t stink as bad as shellfish and bugs, so the use of lichens for purple dying really took off across Europe. 
Tumblr media
Roccella gracilis on wool yarn that has been dyed with orchil made from Lasallia pustulata. Image credit: Isabella Whitworth
As natural history often goes, lichens were largely over exploited for their use in purple dyes over the centuries (cough cough, industrial revolution I am looking at you). It doesn’t help that lichens (particularly the ones used to make purple) are extremely slow growing, impossible to cultivate on any sort of scale, and very sensitive to environmental change. We have records of huge populations of lichen completely obliterated by the large scale dying operations of 18th century, and this likely occurred long before that in other regions that we have a less robust history of. Due to habitat loss and continued human exploitation, Roccella lichens are imperiled in much of their costal habitat. So I don't personally think someone can ethically collect lichens for commercial dying.
But, I am a big fan of salvage lichen collection and dying! That's what I am working on currently, and have a large collection of lichens collected from trails, sidewalks, gutters, woodpiles, and public parks. I am very careful to only collect lichens I can ID as common and can actually use. This way my salvaging has little impact on the environment. IF you happen to live in an area where you can ethically salvage the right lichens for orchil, do it! It's a fun project, and it's a great way to introduce people to some lichens they may otherwise overlook. For example, when I was at Mont-Saint-Michel, they were cleaning the roccella lichens off the walls of the structure and they were piled up EVERYWHERE, and were destined for the bin. I was only able to collect a little, but if someone went into that situation prepared . . . I'd be purple with envy. These situations are few and far between for the purple-making lichens, but I have to believe they are out there.
Anyway, I have plans to share more of the info I have on lichen dyeing in the future. Keep an eye out! And happy crafting.
56 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 18 days ago
Note
Very interesting lichens! How do you find so many? :D
You can find the websites I use to find pictures of lichens under the "images: source" section of all my posts. I have a bunch of different websites I use, and a spreadsheet so I know which ones I've done. I use pictures that are under the creative commons copyright because I a) can't afford to go to all the places lichens are b) don't have the time c) don't have a good camera/am not good at photography, and d) am not trying to make money off of this site at all. Education only! I wish I could just travel around and take pictures of lichens and that could be my job but sadly that ain't where I am at in my life :( To make a post, I go to one of my favorite websites, browse around until I find a new lichen I feel like posting/has images available, and then google search it to find as much info as I can.
33 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 18 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Pilophorus robustus
Robust matchstick lichen
Can you believe that things like this exist on the planet somewhere out there right now?!?! In the case of P. robustus, that somewhere happens to be in Arctic habitats. It has an evanescent thallus made up of gray-green and brown granules. It has thick pseudopodetia (stalks) topped with crowns of globose, black apothecia. P. robustus is rare, but never fret! Venture into far northern regions of North America, Greenland, and Europe and you may just find it growing on rocks and gravel in crowded little patches. 
images: source
info: source
177 notes · View notes
lichenaday · 18 days ago
Text
Cladonia!
Tumblr media
colony of pixie cup lichen we found up the canyon yesterday
287 notes · View notes
house-ad · 2 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
63K notes · View notes