Tumgir
nasa · a day ago
Text
From Racing Suits to Robotic Gloves: How to Gear Up with NASA Technology
Did you know you are surrounded by NASA technology? From your apartment building to the doctor’s office, and even in your cellphone camera, there is more space in your life than you think!
In the latest edition of Spinoff, we are introducing dozens of new ways NASA technology could cross your path. Whether you need an extra “hand” on the production line or a weatherproof jacket, check out how to gear up with technology made for space.
Grip-Strengthening Glove
Tumblr media
Robots are crucial to exploring space and other planets – they could even support astronauts and form the advance party for places humans have yet to reach. But the human machine is hard to replicate.
A collaboration with General Motors helped us build Robonaut 2 – and the design for this robot’s hands has been adapted into a robotic glove that helps manufacturing employees, such as automobile workers, reduce injuries and improve quality control.
The Swedish company Bioservo used the Robo-Glove technology to create the world’s first industrial-strength robotic glove for factory workers who perform repetitive manual tasks.
The Ironhand glove adds force to the user’s grip with artificial tendons and pressure sensors on the palm and the fingers.
The result? Reduced strain on the user’s own tendons and muscles, meaning fewer workplace stress injuries and better comfort for workers.
Temperature-Control Fabrics
Tumblr media
Spacesuits need major insulation and temperature control to protect astronauts on extravehicular activities, aka spacewalks. To help solve this, we created a phase-change material with help from the Triangle Research and Development Corporation.
With funding from a NASA Small Business Innovation Research contract, Triangle incorporated the material into a fabric glove insert that could maintain a steady temperature by absorbing and releasing heat, ensuring it feels just right.
While the invention never made it to orbit, it did make it into the driver’s seat.
Outlast Technologies exclusively licensed the material from Triangle and has incorporated it into outdoor gear, bedding, and now – auto racing suits with help from Cambridge, England-based Walero.
Tumblr media
Due to extreme temperatures in the cockpit, drivers in almost every major racing championship wear Walero for its cooling properties. Cristiana Oprea (pictured) wears it while driving for the European Rally Championship. Credit: Walero
The race undergarments, bonded with fire-retardant material for added protection, help drivers maintain a lower core temperature and heart rate, which means fewer mistakes and better lap times.
The suits have been sold to both amateur racers and professional NASCAR drivers.
Lightweight Rain Jackets
Tumblr media
The superinsulating material that makes up space blankets is one of our most ubiquitous spinoffs. Found everywhere from inside the walls and roofs of buildings to cryogenic tanks and MRI machines, radiant barrier technology was first created to insulate spacesuits and spacecraft. And now this NASA spinoff can be found in weatherproof jackets as well.
Inspired by her passion to run following a series of surgeries to help correct a life-threatening injury, Hema Nambiar launched her Larchmont, New York, start-up company 13-One. To create her jacket, she worked with Advanced Flexible Materials Inc.’s brand Heatsheets. The brand was already marketing products like the space blankets traditionally distributed after races to prevent dangerous drops in temperature.
Tumblr media
The 13-One jackets are designed to be warm and weatherproof, but their thin, reflective lining lets them also be lightweight and easily portable. Credit: Lourenso Ramautar, Out of New York Studio
The resulting line of jackets has a black exterior and a lining to reflect body heat. They weigh less than a pound, are wind- and water-resistant, and easily pack into a small, built-in pouch.
Want to check out more NASA spinoffs? Be sure to find us on spinoff.nasa.gov and on Twitter.
Interested in licensing your own NASA technologies? Check out the NASA Technology Transfer program at technology.nasa.gov.
Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!
1K notes · View notes
nasa · 13 days ago
Text
How Climate Change Showed Up in 2021
2021 was tied for the sixth-hottest year since modern record keeping began. We work together with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to track temperatures around the world and study how they change from year to year.
Tumblr media
For decades, the overall global temperature has been increasing because of human activities. The last decade has been the warmest on record. Each individual year’s average temperature, however, can be affected by things like ocean circulation, volcanic eruptions, and specific weather events.
For instance, last year we saw the beginning of La Niña – a pattern of cooler waters in the Pacific – that was responsible for slightly cooling 2021’s average temperature. Still, last year continued a long-term trend of global warming.
Globally, Earth’s temperature in 2021 was nearly 2°F warmer than the late 19th Century, for the seventh year in a row.
Tumblr media
The Record
Studying 142 Years
Since 1880, we can put together a consistent record of temperatures around the planet and see that it was much colder in the late-19th century. Before 1880, uncertainties in tracking global temperatures are larger. Temperatures have increased even faster since the 1970s, the result of increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
Tracking Millions of Individual Observations
Our scientists use millions of individual observations of data from more than 20,000 weather stations and Antarctic research stations, together with ship- and buoy-based observations of sea surface temperatures, to track global temperatures.
Tumblr media
Reviewing Multiple Independent Records
Our global temperature record – GISTEMP – is one of a number of independent global temperature records, all of which show the same pattern of warming.
Tumblr media
The Consequences
Everywhere Experiences Climate Change Differently
As Earth warms, temperature changes occur unevenly around the globe. The Arctic is currently warming about four times faster than the rest of the planet – a process called Arctic amplification. Similarly, urban areas tend to warm faster than rural areas, partly because building materials like asphalt, steel and concrete retain heat.
Tumblr media
Droughts and Floods in Warmer Weather
More than 88% of the Western US experienced drought conditions in 2021. At the same time, communities in Western Europe saw two months’ worth of rain in 24 hours, breaking records and triggering flash floods. Because a hotter climate means more water can be carried in the atmosphere, areas like the Western US suffer drought from the increased 'thirstiness' of the atmosphere, while precipitation events can become more extreme as the amount of moisture in the atmosphere rises.
Tumblr media
Sea Levels Continue to Rise
Melting ice raises sea levels around the world, as meltwater drains into the ocean. In addition, heat causes the ocean water to expand. From 1993 to today, global mean sea level has been rising around 3.4 millimeters per year. In 2021, sea level data from the recently launched NASA/ESA Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich mission became available to the public.
Tumblr media
There is Hope
“This is not good news, but the fact that we are able to track this in real time and understand why it’s changing, and get people to notice why it’s changing and how we can change things to change the next trajectory, that gives me hope. Because we’re not in the dark here. We’re not the dinosaurs who are unaware the comet is coming. We can see the comet coming, and we can act.” – Dr. Gavin Schmidt, director of NASA GISS, where the global temperature record is calculated
Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!
3K notes · View notes
nasa · 26 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
Happy New Year From NASA! The year 2021 was one for the books, so what will 2022 bring? No matter what, remember: You are made of star stuff. Sparkly, glorious star stuff.
What's this image? Click here. Credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA, A. Sarajedini Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!
4K notes · View notes
nasa · 29 days ago
Text
NASA Communications and Navigation in 2021: Top 10 Iconic Moments
Did you know NASA uses global networks of antennas and relay satellites to talk with astronauts and spacecraft?
Our space communications and navigation community has had an incredible year! From supporting science and exploration missions to developing cutting-edge tech, here are some of the team’s most impactful accomplishments of 2021.
Tumblr media
1. We launched a revolutionary tech demo, the Laser Communications Relay Demonstration, which will showcase the benefits of using infrared laser links to send data from space. Laser communications systems can offer 10 to 100 times more data per second than traditional radio! You can learn more about the mission in a new season of our podcast, The Invisible Network.
Tumblr media
2. Planetary radars observed their 1,000th near-Earth asteroid since 1968! Our Deep Space Network plays a critical role in detecting near-Earth asteroids, using radar to spot them. These radar detections help definitively predict if an asteroid is going to hit Earth, or if it’s just going to pass close by.
Tumblr media
3. We used lessons learned developing communications services for the Moon to address digital inequality on Earth. Folks at our Glenn Research Center in Cleveland examined how lunar network approaches could address technical challenges to Wi-Fi connectivity in their local community.
Tumblr media
4. Our Search and Rescue office participated in dress rehearsals for the Artemis I mission to the Moon! They tested critical distress technologies that will help locate Artemis astronauts in the unlikely event they need to leave the Orion capsule and enter open water before recovery teams can reach them.
Tumblr media
5. With high international participation, we hosted a virtual workshop on cognitive communications at our Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Cognitive communications employs artificial intelligence and machine learning in radio systems to provide a host of benefits to user missions!
Tumblr media
6. We celebrated the 100th birthday of the creator of Star Trek, the late Gene Roddenberry. The event featured Roddenberry’s son Rod, NASA administrator Bill Nelson, and Star Trek actor George Takei. Following the program, our Deep Space Network broadcast Gene’s 1976 remarks on diversity and inclusion toward star system 40 Eridani — home to the planet Vulcan in Star Trek lore. Signals from the broadcast will arrive there in 16.5 years.
Tumblr media
7. We worked with the aerospace community to refine our LunaNet architecture for lunar communications and navigation services! LunaNet will leverage innovative networking techniques, standards, and an extensible framework to rapidly expand network capabilities at the Moon for Artemis. This framework will allow industry, academia, and international partners to build and operate LunaNet nodes alongside us.
Tumblr media
8. Our Deep Space Network welcomed a brand new satellite dish into the family! Called Deep Space Station 56, or DSS-56, the 112-foot-wide (34-meter) dish is now online and ready to communicate for a variety of uses, including missions at the Moon and Mars.
Tumblr media
9. Our Near Space Network engaged with over 200 commercial aerospace companies! They’re working toward a new paradigm where NASA missions near Earth can rely on a blend of government and commercial space communications infrastructure to meet their needs.
Tumblr media
10. Our 10th item on the list isn’t a single moment, but the continued support our communications networks provided missions throughout 2021. Whether it was a Commercial Crew mission to the International Space Station or the Perseverance Rover’s touchdown on Mars, our Near Space Network and Deep Space Network were there to empower mission success! Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!
826 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
Ever wanted to look back in time? This week, we’re launching a kind of time machine – a telescope so powerful it will help us see back some of the first stars and galaxies made after the Big Bang.
The James Webb Space Telescope is the largest and most advanced telescope we’ve ever put in space. With revolutionary technology, it will study 13.5 billion years of cosmic history and help humanity understand our place in the stars.
Tomorrow, Dec. 25, at 7:20 a.m. ET (12:20 UTC), the Webb Telescope is set to launch from French Guiana, beginning a 29-day journey to a spot a million miles away.
How to Watch:
In English:
Dec. 25
Live coverage starts at 6:00 a.m. ET/11:00 UTC
Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Twitch
In Spanish:
Dec. 25
Live coverage starts at 6:30 a.m. ET/11:30 UTC
Facebook, YouTube, Twitter
youtube
Once Webb launches, the journey has only just begun. The telescope will begin a 2-week-long process of unfolding itself in space before settling in to explore the universe in ways we’ve never seen before.
Follow along on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and with #UnfoldTheUniverse.
6K notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Text
Our Parker Solar Probe Just Touched the Sun!
Tumblr media
For the first time in history, a spacecraft has touched the Sun. Our Parker Solar Probe flew right through the Sun’s atmosphere, the corona. (That’s the part of the Sun that we can see during a total solar eclipse.)
Tumblr media
This marks one great step for Parker Solar Probe and one giant leap for solar science! Landing on the Moon helped scientists better understand how it was formed. Now, touching the Sun will help scientists understand our star and how it influences worlds across the solar system.
Tumblr media
Unlike Earth, the Sun doesn’t have a solid surface (it’s a giant ball of seething, boiling gases). But the Sun does have a superheated atmosphere. Heat and pressure push solar material away from the Sun. Eventually, some of that material escapes the pull of the Sun’s gravity and magnetism and becomes the solar wind, which gusts through the entire solar system.
But where exactly does the Sun’s atmosphere end and the solar wind begin? We’ve never known for sure. Until now!
Tumblr media
In April 2021, Parker Solar Probe swooped near the Sun. It passed through a massive plume of solar material in the corona. This was like flying into the eye of a hurricane. That flow of solar stuff — usually a powerful stream of particles — hit the brakes and went into slow-motion.
For the first time, Parker Solar Probe found itself in a place where the Sun’s magnetism and gravity were strong enough to stop solar material from escaping. That told scientists Parker Solar Probe had passed the boundary: On one side, space filled with solar wind, on the other, the Sun’s atmosphere.
Tumblr media
Parker Solar Probe’s proximity to the Sun has led to another big discovery: the origin of switchbacks, zig-zag-shaped magnetic kinks in the solar wind.
These bizarre shapes were first observed in the 1990s. Then, in 2019, Parker Solar Probe revealed they were much more common than scientists first realized. But they still had questions, like where the switchbacks come from and how the Sun makes them.
Tumblr media
Recently, Parker Solar Probe dug up two important clues. First, switchbacks tend to have lots of helium, which scientists know comes from the solar surface. And they come in patches.
Those patches lined up just right with magnetic funnels that appear on the Sun’s surface. Matching these clues up like puzzle pieces, scientists realized switchbacks must come from near the surface of the Sun.
Figuring out where switchbacks come from and how they form will help scientists understand how the Sun produces the solar wind. And that could clue us into one of the Sun’s biggest mysteries: why the Sun’s atmosphere is much, much hotter than the surface below.
Tumblr media
Parker Solar Probe will fly closer and closer to the Sun. Who knows what else we’ll discover?
Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!
5K notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Text
That’s a wrap! Thank you for all the wonderful questions. James Webb Space Telescope Planetary Scientist Dr. Naomi Rowe-Gurney answered questions about the science goals, capabilities, and her hopes for the world's most powerful telescope.
Check out her full Answer Time for more: Career | Science Goals | Capabilities
We hope you enjoyed today and learned something new about the Webb mission! Don’t miss the historic launch of this first-of-its kind space observatory. Tune in to NASA TV HERE on Dec. 22 starting at 7:20 a.m. EST (12:20 UTC).
If today’s Answer Time got you excited, explore all the ways you can engage with the mission before launch! Join our #UnfoldTheUniverse art challenge, our virtual social event with international space agencies, and countdown to liftoff with us. Check out all the ways to participate HERE.
Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space!
723 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Text
Questions coming up from….
@teamadamsperret: Congrats on your PhD!! When people ask what you do, what's your reply?
@Anonymous: How does it feel, working in NASA?
@moonlighy: How did you find your love for this job?
@redbullanddepression: what the prettiest star in the sky in your opinion? also, you are a great role model as a queer woman who is attending university next year to major in aerospace engineering!!!
1K notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
Hi.dr.naomi.i have 2 questions.
1.Can this JAMES WEB T.S able to see Mercury, Venus and certain stars that are close to the sun either. I.
2.Why is the James Webb t.s.mirror yellow?
Any specific reason for this
600 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
Will it take pictures of Pluto?
355 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
When will we start seeing images from the James Webb telescope??
369 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
What would be the ideal discovery to make with the Webb Telescope? Or what would you love to find with it?
838 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
Does Webb have resolution to look more closely at nearby objects, like Mars or even Earth? Or just far things?
1K notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
Hello. I'm curious what new feature the james webb brings to the table, like its ability to detect in infrared, that you are most excited about? What are you most interested to look into with this new telescope?
164 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
How exactly will it work? And whats the goal of the project?
219 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
Do you have any protections against asteroids?
228 notes · View notes
nasa · a month ago
Note
Concerning the new telescope -out of curiosity- what is the maximum distance it can view planets, galaxies, objects, anything up to -in terms of common/metric measurement, and/or years (if applicable) etc.? -Rose
301 notes · View notes