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saritawolff · 2 hours ago
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And one more whale, the freakishly long Basilosaurus cetoides. One of the top predators, if not THE top predator, of the Tethys Sea, Basilosaurus was the largest animal in the Paleogene at up to 66 feet long. It preyed on sharks, marine mammals, large fish, and other cetaceans like Dorudon.

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saritawolff · 11 hours ago
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Text Post Meme, Sarita Edition

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saritawolff · 11 hours ago
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Happy Lunar New Year! I drew Ozzy as a rat for last year’s Year of the Rat, I guess it’s only fair I draw Sullivan for his year.

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saritawolff · 11 hours ago
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Finally continuing my simplistic synapsid series and starting on mammals. School is intense right now and I’m trying to nail down a schedule that allows me to get everything done yet still have some free time. So yeah I’ll still be working on these, but won’t be able to come up with new ones as often as I was before.

Anyway, with that out of the way, here is Ambulocetus natans!

Ambulocetus was one of the first cetaceans (whales) to take to the water, living a semi-aquatic lifestyle similar to otters or crocodiles. These sea lion-sized ungulates lived in modern day India, which used to be a tropical island before colliding with the rest of Asia. They lived in coastal brackish mangrove swamps alongside sharks, turtles, crocodiles, and other early cetaceans like Pakicetus.

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saritawolff · 7 days ago
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fandomsandfeminism:

closet-keys:

the worse climate disaster gets, the more you’ll see closet eugenicists start to advocate for letting people die. you need to be prepared to combat the ideology wherever you see it, because it’s only going to get worse and worse

Read everything having to do with climate disaster critically. If the central argument underlying what’s being said is that the death of disabled and/or racialized people is inevitable, natural, or desirable– that’s a fascist.

they might be appear to be a garden variety republican or liberal or even a leftist at first, but know that if that argument is being made, their underlying ideology is one of supremacism, and given additional climate stress, they will become more blatant about it.

“The Earth will heal itself” “humanity is like a virus” “The Earth will be better off once humans die out.”

These are eco-fascist talking points. The climate disaster will hit the global poor FIRST and WORST. While the capitalist elite who CAUSED this problem will have the resources to jet around to whatever corner of the Earth is still inhabitable, or to their space arcs, or their Mars colonies run by indentured servants- the global poor will be the ones who die by the millions.

This is not justice. This is not nature. This is neither inevitable nor good. Do not let people use environmentalism as an excuse for genocide.

66K notes
saritawolff · 7 days ago
Photo

pigeon-feet:

male Gallimimus showin off

fullview

(skeletal by scott hartman)

kudos to anyone who guesses what the coloration is based off of!!

Post
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saritawolff · 7 days ago
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kaijutegu:

Or youtube video, or instagram post, etc.

Look: I get it. You see the cute lizard video, you watch the cute lizard video. But is the lizard video really cute?

Well, that can be hard to tell.

Like, really, really hard to tell. Not every animal situation on the internet is cut-and-dry, good or bad. Most of them, you don’t have the full context! You can’t tell how the person’s husbandry is, what the enclosure is like, or how they keep up with daily care.

Well, maybe this guide can help a little bit. This is meant to be used as a quick reference when evaluating short internet content. It’s not super useful for dedicated pettubers, because for those, you usually have a person explaining their entire ethos and showing you things like husbandry and care. Full breakdowns and evaluations for those are a lot more complicated.

What this guide is for is for when your mom sends you a viral video of a lizard and you have to explain to her that you’d really, really like her to stop sending you videos of animal abuse, or when you see someone doing something really dangerous with an alligator. I know this is a long post, but there’s a lot of things to watch out for!

Source: Is it from Jay Brewer (prehistoricpets/reptilezoo) or Brian Barcyzk (snakebytetv)? It’s bad. Stop giving them your attention/ad clicks. It just tells them that nobody cares about how miserable their animals are.

I know that’s flippant, but seriously, look at the source of your content. If it’s a facility that’s known for animal mistreatment, then don’t watch their stuff. Easy as that! Don’t feed into the content machine- don’t tell the algorithm that their content is what you want to see. Even if the individual post is ok and doesn’t show any animal mistreatment, people like Jay and Brian are known for their poor husbandry practices overall. This is the kind of enclosure Brian thinks it’s ok for a giant snake to spend its entire life in.

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Seriously, don’t give that man any more attention. Lots of breeders use racks, but this is at the low end of bad for racks. If you see content from someone who’s got a history of bad care, don’t watch it!

Oh, and how do you find out if they have a history of bad care? Google “Name here+bad care” and see what comes up. If it’s a one off thing where like, one animal is in crappy condition? Might be fine, they might have course-corrected. If it’s pages and pages of stuff? Red flags all around.

Venom: Is somebody taking a selfie with a venomous snake? It’s bad.

They’re putting themselves in danger for social media attention. Even if it’s a choice they made and they say they’re not hurting anybody else, they are. By putting themselves at risk unnecessarily, they put other people at risk. If they get bitten, the dose of antivenin that they receive is probably from a zoo, where actual educators put themselves at risk for conservation. Antivenin is expensive, and in many cases, you can’t even get it. For instance, in the US, there’s only one antivenin commercially available to hospitals for treating venomous snakebites. It’s called CroFeb, and according to The Washington Post, the price for one hospital vial is about $2,300. A typical treatment dose? That requires four to six vials. So for a single, smaller rattlesnake bite that would need four vials of antivenin, the cost is $9,200.

And that’s if you’re lucky enough to get bitten by a rattler and to be in range of a hospital that has the antivenin. If you get bit by say, a cobra? That antivenin is coming from a zoo or research facility, and if there’s not one nearby that can help you, you are SOL. And quite possibly DOA.

Don’t take selfies with venomous snakes. Just don’t do it. Don’t support social media personalities who do it.

However… if the person is using snake hooks, using the proper grip on the snake if they are holding it, and taking proper precautions by having somebody else to spot and film… then it might be fine! There’s lots of good reasons to handle venomous snakes, believe it or not. One of my favorite reptile facilities that posts venomous animals is the Kentucky Reptile Zoo. KRZ is one of the most important venom facilities in the US- they keep all kinds of species and milk them for their venom, which not only goes to make antivenom but also is used for things like cancer research. You can bet when they post pictures of someone handling a venomous snake, that person is well-trained and is handling that animal for a purpose.

Egg cutting: It’s probably bad.

This is the practice of cutting open snake eggs before it’s time to hatch. Sometimes keepers need to do this because a baby is struggling, and that’s ok! Sometimes keepers do this to show off the patterns, and that’s really not ok! It can cause severe damage to the hatchlings. Furthermore, it’s not like it’s a surprise. Breeders who cut eggs already know have a really good idea of what’s going to be inside because they’re breeding for color morphs- they know the genetics they put together. They’re just doing it for attention, and not thinking of what’s best for the animal. It’s like an unboxing video that can lead to dead baby snakes. Not cool.

Inappropriate feeding: If somebody is giving their lizard a hot dog, it’s bad.

Animals need to eat, but what are they being fed? Is it a diet item appropriate for the species? Even if it’s appropriate, how much is being fed? Is the animal being fed according to an appropriate schedule? This varies so much from individual to individual, but in general, appropriate food includes whole prey (and if it’s being videoed, it should always be pre-killed!), most fruits and veggies, and things like small pieces of fish and chicken for monitors/tegus. Here are some things that are never acceptable: processed meat, like chicken nuggets, hamburgers, and hot dogs. Pizza. Candy. Bread. Ice cream. (I have seen social media of all of these. Some from “professional” reptile keepers.)

Live feeding: Reputable facilities and responsible owners aren’t going to film their reptile killing a live rodent and put it on TikTok for your entertainment.

While some keepers do need to feed live, responsible owners know that live feedings must be supervised and given their full attention because rodents can fight back. If they’re filming, they aren’t taking good safety measures. Insects are generally fine, though, so long as it’s a standard feeder. Crickets, roaches, mealworms, superworms, hornworms… stuff like that isn’t going to hurt the animal eating it. If you see somebody trying to feed their gecko a bee or something? That’s bad content.

Obese animals: A chonky reptile is a reptile that’s probably dying a slow, painful death from fatty liver disease.

This can be really difficult to assess, because most people don’t know what a healthy reptile actually looks like… and because the norm for pet reptiles on social media is obesity. Generally, the best thing to do is look for pictures of those animals in the wild and compare. Wild animals are often a lot skinnier than their captive counterparts, but you’ll get the gist pretty quickly of what the animal is supposed to look like. No species of reptile naturally has fat rolls (although big skin wrinkles aren’t uncommon, and some animals have heavier bodies than you might expect).

Examples of obese reptiles on social media include:

Margo the bearded dragon

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Macguyver the tegu

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Pretty much everything Jay Brewer/Prehistoric Pets/The Reptile Zoo owns

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Cats, dogs, and other pets: There is no safe way for a cat and a reptile to interact. Period.

If there’s a cat in the video and the cat is touching a reptile, it ain’t safe. I have written extensively about this but the gist of it is that cats harbor bacteria that is super toxic to reptiles, and even the most gentle pat can turn into a scratch that gets infected and is extremely hard to treat. It stresses the reptile out and in some cases can be super dangerous for the cat, too, if the reptile fights back.

However… if the reptile interaction is with another animal of the same species and they’re just kinda chilling in the same space, that’s fine. Some animals actually do better living in social situations, like alligators, rattlesnakes, garter snakes, mourning geckos, and dart frogs! Some animals do just fine hanging out with other animals like them- if you see a video with a bunch of bearded dragons in it and they’re not all sharing the same cage and they’re just chilling, that’s probably fine!

Intentionally aggravating the animal: Being a jerk is bad.

Yeah, I know, the video of that Budgett’s frog going REEEEEEEEE sounds hilarious, but that animal’s in a lot of distress! Don’t poke animals with sticks to get them to make noise! That’s mean! If the animal is flinching away from a stimulus, or squinching its eyes shut really tight, those are both signs that something’s wrong here. Reptile body language can be really hard to read, so you might need to google around or ask someone.

Holding an amphibian: Usually bad.

Not a reptile issue, really, but worth addressing because reptiles and amphibians get lumped in together. Amphibians have porous skin and are vulnerable to the oils we have on our hands. Chemical exposures can kill them. If somebody’s holding a frog for more than a brief moment, that’s not good for it. There are valid reasons to hold an amphibian- sometimes you have to move them! But generally videos of people holding amphibians aren’t great and you should always be critical and ask what the point of the contact is.

Handling crocodilians without banding their mouths: If the public can access the animal, always bad. If it’s in a private setting, not always bad but can be bad.

If someone is holding an alligator or crocodilian of any kind and its mouth isn’t banded, there is a big problem. It doesn’t hurt them to have their mouths banded. Usually it’s done with hair ties or electrical tape, which peels off very easily and doesn’t bother them at all. Any crocodilian with public access needs to be banded. If it’s out of the enclosure, a band goes on the mouth. There’s no excuse. Even the little ones have razor sharp teeth and remarkably strong jaw-closing muscles. Now, if you’re working privately and you’re feeding, then obviously you won’t band- but if the person in the video isn’t being careful and is working within six feet of an unbanded adult crocodilian’s mouth, that’s irresponsible.

Alligators in particular make wonderful ambassadors. They’re charismatic, they’re adorable as babies, and they really can get quite used to being held and worked with. But an unbanded alligator that the public can access is a public safety hazard. Also, if you’re in the US, it’s illegal in most states. It doesn’t matter if you’re an educator or whatever, band your crocodilian’s mouths before taking them outside.

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Blowing smoke or vaping in a reptile’s face: This is animal abuse.

We get it. You vape. But reptiles have really primitive lungs- in fact, snakes only have one functional lung. Reptiles have really bad reactions to nicotine, THC, essential oil diffusion, smoke, and pretty much anything else that lets off a lot of VOCs. It’s not funny, it’s not cute, and it’s always bad when somebody is smoking or vaping around a reptile.

Now like I said: you can’t learn everything from a single TikTok, youtube video, or instagram post! These are just some of the big red flags to watch out for. There’s lots of good reptile content out there that’s totally fine and safe and good- you just have to know how to spot the bad stuff! Thanks for reading!

3K notes
saritawolff · 9 days ago
Answer

Imagine an elf is given a job to do at a human institution. The humans think elves don’t need bathroom breaks, since they know they can hold it for days, but this elf has been traveling to reach their job, and has already been holding it to the point they are in pain. They ask for a break, but their job is important and time sensitive, so they admit they can still hold it when asked. After a full day of work, the elf tries to reach the bathroom in time, but they were never told where it is.

This is the second time I’ve received this ask wth

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saritawolff · 15 days ago
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61K notes
saritawolff · 16 days ago
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beaniebaneenie:

taekotanaka:

taekotanaka:

shout out to ace and aro kids who are constantly bombarded with the opinion that sex and romantic love are directly connected to living a happy life.

Y’all are just reblogging this at the speed of sound tonight

Since it’s almost valentines day, and this message is about to get hammered in even more, reblogging this again.

254K notes
saritawolff · 17 days ago
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saritawolff · 17 days ago
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fandomsandfeminism:

closet-keys:

the worse climate disaster gets, the more you’ll see closet eugenicists start to advocate for letting people die. you need to be prepared to combat the ideology wherever you see it, because it’s only going to get worse and worse

Read everything having to do with climate disaster critically. If the central argument underlying what’s being said is that the death of disabled and/or racialized people is inevitable, natural, or desirable– that’s a fascist.

they might be appear to be a garden variety republican or liberal or even a leftist at first, but know that if that argument is being made, their underlying ideology is one of supremacism, and given additional climate stress, they will become more blatant about it.

“The Earth will heal itself” “humanity is like a virus” “The Earth will be better off once humans die out.”

These are eco-fascist talking points. The climate disaster will hit the global poor FIRST and WORST. While the capitalist elite who CAUSED this problem will have the resources to jet around to whatever corner of the Earth is still inhabitable, or to their space arcs, or their Mars colonies run by indentured servants- the global poor will be the ones who die by the millions.

This is not justice. This is not nature. This is neither inevitable nor good. Do not let people use environmentalism as an excuse for genocide.

66K notes
saritawolff · 18 days ago
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Ozzy: great with kids, A+ babysitter

Snitley: not so much

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saritawolff · 19 days ago
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is-the-owl-vid-cute:

is-the-owl-vid-cute:

is-the-owl-vid-cute:

krystal-prisms:

leghorn:

isthisanimalmediacute:

xenorat:

isthisanimalmediacute:

velociraptrix:

bewareofchickens:

Mamma Chicken vs Hawk

this is blatently staged. it’s hard to get a screenshot, but the hawks wings are either partially clipped or damaged, as it couldn’t fly away.

the things that ticked me off are 1. the fucking MUSIC. 2. the recorder made no effort to stop it 3. the location the hawk came from is off-screen. it looks like it was tossed down on to the chicken, and although nothing got hurt, this is needless endangerment of both the chicken, chicks, and the hawk. I wouldn’t be surprised if this came from one of those fake rescue YouTube channels. this is ridiculously cruel.

also, at y'all saying “it’s no surprise chickens are descended from dinosaurs!” - they’re not descended from dinosaurs! they ARE dinosaurs, as is the hawk. all birds are dinosaurs. just a fun fact to finish off a horrible post

1. Music is added in post. You can have multiple audio channels while editing a video

2. Wings are not clipped, it’s clearly molting

3. It wasn’t tossed, the shadow shows it coming out of a dive maneuver before the hawk itself comes into frame

4. If it had been tossed, it wouldn’t be aiming for one of the chicks in particular.

Looks like an inexperienced young predator bit off more than it could chew and panicked. Taking off from the ground isn’t that easy, especially while your head feathers are getting yanked out and you’re being beaten by wings, it was trying to get some distance before flying upwards and it didn’t work out well.

One could argue it’s suspicious that the person just happened to be filming at the right moment and calmly captured the whole encounter instead of flailing the camera around, yelling, or intervening, but that’s hardly proof of anything. Some people are just unflappable.

Anyway, literally every single one of the arguments you made was bullshit.

alright, so I went out of my way to find the source video because I like to believe the best in people/situations. unfortunately, you’re wrong. here is the video: https://youtu.be/N6Jy5Z5iBto

and here is a screenshot of the channels most recent uploads:

I was right on the mark: it’s one of those fake rescue channels done for easy money. there are countless of these going around, and I had two other videos on different channels featuring (potentially) the same bird. this should be the end of this response as it’s self explanatory but I’ll go into more detail in case people aren’t aware. these videos are blatently staged, often reusing the same animals and showcasing completely improbable circumstances. the situation of a hawk diving on chickens is not particularly unusual so it makes sense nobody would bat an eye, but it doesn’t change the fact that that bird was not diving, it was either tossed or trying to come down from a higher perch. either way, the bird is incapable of flying, either because of a poor moult, or more likely, intentional tampering.

moulted feathers is one thing, but the existing feathers are extremely damaged. not only that, but throughout the video, the bird is clearly in distress, mouth wide open with tongue sticking out. it is either overheating, extremely stressed out, or both. the poor feather condition also implies heavy handling.

This video is 100% staged, as is every other video on this channel, but in a situation where a domestic animal is under attack, who the fuck sits and records it up to 5 minutes following, and then edits it and adds dramatic music in post? it’s one thing if it’s wild animals doing wild animal things, but this is a (poorly kept not wild) young crested hawk-eagle and chickens. and again, for any doubts, the same species if not individual is featured in several other videos doing similar shit being thrown at defensive chickens for quick clicks, such as this one, where there is even less effort made to hide the fact this bird has no fucking wing feathers anymore (hawks do not have simultaneous moults)

and, for comparison, a healthy crested hawk-eagle, with normal wings:

I will finish the post with this video by Mike Dane going over some of the more ‘blatent’ animal abuse produced by these channels (since people love to brush up animal cruelty if it’s to birds) as the final nail in the coffin: https://youtu.be/Uol7XGAZ4go

Everyone Please think critically when you see videos featuring wild animals and even domesticated animals being “rescued.”  I cannot understate how many fucked up things people do to animals to go viral on social media and how widespread it is. 

@is-the-owl-vid-cute third opinion?

No need. @/isthisanimalmediacute is tight on the mark and this is absolutely staged.

There is no way these people would have an entire YouTube channel full of clickbait on dramatic animal encounters if they weren’t staging it, and the hawk eagle absolutely shows signs of being kept in a small wire cage with feathers like that. It’s very likely the bird was trapped/found down with an injury and the people just use it to stage these videos, no doubt keeping it in a tiny chicken pen in the meantime feeding it lunch meat. Unfortunately, this is not actually against the law in many of the countries this species inhabits.

A wild changeable hawk eagle would NOT be constantly distressed like this one is in every video, and it would not have all its feathers frayed and broken off like that. That is a very specific type of feather damage from poor caging.

The way it enters frame in that first video is also not in any way, shape, or form how a raptor would be diving onto prey. It was haphazard and awkward, it looked like it fell into frame because it quite literally did.

Were it in good feather condition, health, and actually trying to catch something, the hen would absolutely have not been able to stop it. In fact, given the species, it would be more likely to go for the hen than the chicks. The reason the chickens survived unharmed is because a stunned raptor was thrown at them and she got aggressive before it knew what was happening. It’s traumatic to all individuals involved really.

Compare what you see in the video to images of similar raptors actually hunting. They don’t just flail to the ground and try to grab prey once they get there. They’re readying their feet to grab and subdue prey before they touch the ground, and they chase game, they don’t land at all until their prey is in their talons. If it’s light enough, some won’t land at all. If a wild changeable hawk eagle was actually interested in a chick of all things, it would’ve snatched it up and been gone before the hen could blink. Given these raptors weigh 2-4lbs though, it’s far more likely it would’ve gone for the adult and hardly noticed the chicks.

None of this is seen in the video. Nothing about the position of the bird when it comes in suggests it was trying to capture anything. I doubt it even saw the chickens before the hen attacked.

Honestly there’s hardly a need for any proof beyond the fact this hawk eagle, which is STRICTLY a forest raptor built for hunting among dense foliage and often pulls birds or lizards from trees as a primary prey source, is for some reason “attacking” a random chicken in a dusty ditch completely in the open? Am I expected to believe that, with everything else that’s on the table added to it? Absolutely not.

Another addendum because, yes, I am still in fact mad at this awful video:

I mentioned that sort of feather damage is usually only seen to this extent from birds being kept in tiny cages with wires that bend and fray the feathers, I still maintain that, but another possibility is that this bird is pitted so often against chickens and whatever else there’s a good chance that is also a contributing factor. It may as well be used in a chicken fighting ring, but with a PETA Approved twist to make it seem like a cool heartwarming rescue from an evil raptor.

This is absolutely just abusing a wild animal to prey on gullible people on the internet who will always believe and share the video so it can get more clicks and the people who filmed it get paid. That’s all this is.

42K notes
saritawolff · 20 days ago
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pixeltheleopardgecko:

calleo:

arcticarthropod:

tinysaurus-rex:

aromantic-eight:

zoologicallyobsessed:

We need to better educate kids on the importance of animals that are typically hated because otherwise you end up with adults who think hating wasps is a personality.

Trufax: hatred of wasps is so widespread that it’s prevalent among biologists as well. An entire field full of people getting excited about species that nobody else has heard of, and many have collectively decided that wasps don’t need to be researched, even though they’re threatened by the same things that are threatening bees, and disappearance of wasps will spell bad things for the number of pests found in gardens and farms.

I have a friend wasp named Queeny. She built her nest on a really inconvenient area where I often dump my birds’ uneaten seed or shake towels out. She would come out angrily and buzz at us, ready to defend her home from the strange giants.

Queeny didn’t know that it was our porch she built her home on, she saw a nice ledge and decided that it was a suitable spot to begin her life as a lone female.

So instead of removing the nest and poisoning her with bug spray, you know what I did? I moved the area where I dump my things and started feeding her. I would tap three times on the railing before leaving a treat like fruit, honey, dog food, or pesky beetles I find in my garden, then move away to give them lots of space. At first she would buzz out, wings spread and ready to fight, but after doing this for just a few days…she stopped!

Now when she comes out, it’s slowly and non-threatingly. She tilts her head at me before gingerly inspecting the offerings. She doesn’t threaten my mom any more either, she’s learned that we mean no harm. We’ve started using that ledge to shake sheets out and dump bird seed and she doesn’t mind at all! She just watches quietly.

She even has a family now! Five daughters and one lad- a husband or son, not sure which lmao -who greet us the same, she must’ve taught them that we’re not enemies (or they just grew up used to us). They even protect my garden, since Queeny’s family has grown the invasive Japanese beetle population has plummeted! They really are delightful neighbors.

To do list:

Befriend some wasps

There have been studies that prove wasps (paper wasps, Polistes fuscatus specifically) and honeybees can recognize human faces. Other wasps and bees likely can as well, it was just  Polistes fuscatus that was studied more closely.

If you’re a dick to them, they’ll remember that.

If you’re nice to them, they’ll remember that as well.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/12/111202-wasps-people-faces-recognition-insects-science-animals/

Yellowjackets seem to have some ability to do it as well; my parents purposely started leaving out dishes of jam and cut up fruit for a massive underground nest they had no possible hope of eradicating (cabin in the middle of nowhere, no exterminators in the area, and as best they could guess they’d have to dig up the entire garden to get it all). Their aim was mostly to keep the hornets away from the areas people often ate or drank because any time food or sweet drinks were out, the hornets came over to basically hijack everything. Even then, any time people came out to eat, they went over to the table they set up near the garden to put out a mini-picnic for the hornets as well, which did pretty well at keeping them from harassing the people who were about 20 feet away.

The secondary aim was to hopefully get the big ol’ colony to realize they weren’t trying to start trouble after my dad got swarmed into the lake a few times for getting too close to a nest entrance he didn’t even know was there.

After a few weeks of that, the hornets were pretty chill about people and my parents were able to figure out where the nest entrances were and just how much of the garden had tons and tons and tons of yellowjackets underneath it so they could move the plants somewhere else in the yard.

The colony is still there years later and probably larger now, the garden was mostly moved, and they still put food out for the hornets; about the only things that fight with the hornets now are oriels, who also want to eat the jelly and fruit and even they’ve sort of learned to share. 

They’re wary of but not aggressive toward new people giving them food but seem to sort of generally recognize people in general is, “They give us food, it’s probably cool.”

The nest entrances have been marked with staked red flags too so nobody accidentally gets too close.

Wasps are just like any other animal. If you leave them alone/let them know you’re not a threat, they’ll leave you alone. You gotta remember that wasps evolved with big critters like us breaking into their nests go eat their protein rich babies, and we’re several hundred times their size - if they aren’t attracted by your food they’re scared of you, and when animals get scared they can get aggressive.

77K notes
saritawolff · 21 days ago
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Well, I’ve already posted this on Instagram before I started on the non-mammals, so I guess we’ll start my mammal series with Aenocyon dirus, the Dire Wolf!

In case you haven’t heard yet, some Dire Wolf DNA was able to be examined and it was found that Dire Wolves are actually not just larger, bulkier gray wolves… in fact they’re not even wolves at all! They belong to their own genus, Aenocyon, and would have probably looked like older species of dog and been more suited for temperate climates rather than tundra.

For this one in particular, I combined coloration of bush dogs, jackals, African wild dogs, and maned wolves. Though it sorta ended up looking like a long-legged wolverine. 😅

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saritawolff · 21 days ago
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And that’s it for my first venture into non-mammalian synapsids! Here’s a size chart with all of the ones I’ve drawn now. As usual please take it with a grain of salt as I just kinda eyeballed their general sizes from other size charts.

This was really fun; I’d never drawn any of these species before and it was fun to kinda learn as I went along. I’ll be putting some of these up as stickers on Redbubble btw, and since I actually drew them a bit larger than usual this time, maybe I’ll venture into some other products as well. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Anyway, my next project is mammalian synapsids, so we’re not venturing back into dinosaur land quite yet!

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saritawolff · 21 days ago
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Therocephalians were a group of synapsids closely related to the cynodonts: the ancestors of mammals. While they looked somewhat similar to gorgonopsids, they were a bit more advanced, and more diverse.

Pristerognathus vanderbyli was a dog-sized therocephalian from the woodlands of middle Permian South Africa. It had a long, narrow skull with saber teeth and likely preyed on smaller synapsids and reptiles.

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