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scotianostra · 11 minutes ago
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Cargill Gilston Knot was born on June 30th 1856.
The splendidly named  Cargill Gilston Knott was the son of Pelham Knott, an agent for a paper manufacturer and his wife Ellen. His paternal uncle was the artist Tavernor Knott. I wonder if the Christian name was due to a religious thing, a couple of people with the surname having featured in previous post that were close to the church in some way.
The family must have moved at some point in his childhood as he was educated at Arbroath High School in Angus, some distance from Penicuik, which is south of Edinburgh, he attended the University of Edinburgh, where he studied alongside James Alfred Ewing. He worked on various aspects of electricity and magnetism, obtaining his doctorate in 1879
Cargill was the founding chairman of Edinburgh Mathematical Society, made important contributions in the field of quaternion algebra and ended his life as General Secretary of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. In short, he was a member of Edinburgh’s intellectual elite. But this summary conceals an exotic excursion.
In the 1880s, following its enforced opening to the wider world, Japan was keen to draw on western expertise in its headlong rush towards modernisation. Thus, at the age of 27, Knott came to be appointed Professor of Physics and Engineering at Tokyo Imperial University. 
In order to expand its commerce Japan needed to construct a network of lighthouses, a challenging project in an earthquake zone. Attempting to identify suitable sites by quantifying the risk of earthquakes Knott began to study the mathematics of wave transmission across the boundaries of sea and land. The resulting ‘Knott’s equations’ remain fundamental to the modern science of reflection seismology.
On his return to Edinburgh, Knott took up the position of a Reader in Applied Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh, holding the post until his death.
He died at his home at 42 Upper Gray Street, Newington, Edinburgh, on 26th October 1922.
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scotianostra · an hour ago
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June 30th 1857 saw the beginning of the trial of Madeleine Smith for murder.
It was labelled as the ‘crime of the century’, and even now, 161 years on, the Madeleine Smith murder case continues to fascinate criminologists and forensic experts around the world.
Accused of poisoning her lover, Pierre Emile L’Angelier,- and with a clear motive to do so - the authorities could have very easily thrown the key away. But instead she got away Scot-free. Opinion remains divided over her innocence to this day.
As a 20-year-old in 1855 she began a secret affair with Pierre Emile L'Angelier, an apprentice nurseryman from the Channel Islands. The two met late at night at Smith’s bedroom window and wrote passionate letters to each other, which would become evidence against her.
During one of their infrequent meetings alone, Smith lost her virginity to L'Angelier.
However her parents, unaware of the affair with L'Angelier, whom Smith had promised to marry, arranged for a fiancé for her within their upper-middle class community. He was William Minnoch.
Desperate now, Smith attempted to break her connection with L'Angelier and, in February 1857, asked him to return the letters she had written to him. Instead, he threatened to expose her in an attempt to force her to marry him.
Early in the morning of 23 March 1857 L'Angelier died from arsenic poisoning. And after Smith’s numerous letters were found in his lodging house she was arrested and charged with his murder.
It emerged that she had been spotted in a druggist ordering arsenic, signing for it as MH Smith.
Early in the morning of 23 March 1857, L'Angelier died from arsenic poisoning. After Smith’s numerous letters were found in his lodging house, she was arrested and charged with murder.
Despite this, and evidence that she had signed for the deadly doses of arsenic as MH Smith – Hamilton was her middle name – the jury of her peers, middle class, returned a not-proven verdict.
There has been a number of books written on the subject, and there’s a no shortage of articles online about the Madeleine Smith case, here is an article at the link below asking if she was guilty.....
https://the-history-girls.blogspot.com/search?q=madeleine
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scotianostra · 2 hours ago
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Good Morning from Scotland 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿
Plockton in the early morning
📸mjsteimlephoto on Instagram
https://t.co/kj87WYEXzb https://t.co/ROADYsMyO0
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scotianostra · 2 hours ago
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Fort Augustus this morning.
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scotianostra · 11 hours ago
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Fort Augustus 11:20 pm
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scotianostra · 12 hours ago
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Caledonian Canal at Fort Augustus
Tonight's port of call
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scotianostra · 18 hours ago
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Looking over Loch Alsh to Skye from Balmacara.
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scotianostra · 18 hours ago
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Isle of Skye 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿
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scotianostra · 21 hours ago
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On June 29th 1927  actor Tom Fleming was born in Edinburgh.
Educated at Edinburgh’s Daniel Stewart, Fleming made his first stage appearance as Bruce McRae in an Emlyn Williams play during a tour of India in 1945. He co-founded the Gateway Theatre in Edinburgh in 1953 and worked there as an actor and director until 1962 when he left to join the Royal Shakespeare Company. In 1965 he became the first director of the Edinburgh Civic Theatre Trust and founded a new company at the Royal Lyceum Theatre in the city. He  worked as a commentator since 1952 specialising in state events, most notably he was did the commentary for the Eurovision Song contest at the Usher Hall in 1972.
He was the first actor ever to play Jesus Christ on British television in the 1956 BBC serial “Jesus Of Nazareth”. He was later considered for the same role in Nicholas Ray’s film, “King Of Kings” , but Jeffrey Hunter eventually played the role  instead. Film roles include Mary, Queen of Scots, with Vanessa Redgrave in 1971, and King Lear.  His television work includes portrayals of Robert Burns and William Wallace.
Tom also published poetry and plays and, in 1998, contributed his memoirs to a collection entitled A Scottish Childhood. He listed his recreations in Who’s Who as “noticing, remembering and wondering”. He was given an honorary doctorate by Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh in 1984 and a fellowship by the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in 1986.
In 1981 he had his largest audience ever – an estimated 700 million listeners worldwide – when he and Angela Rippon described the wedding of Lady Diana Spencer to Prince Charles and it is his voice that many of you might know, he was the commentator  from 1966 until 2008 of the Edinburgh Military Tattoo.   Tom Fleming passed away after a long illness he died in St Columba’s Hospice in Edinburgh on the night of Sunday 18 April 2010.
The video is a short clip of The Mass Pipes and Drums at The Tattoo in 1994, introduced by Tom Fleming.
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scotianostra · 21 hours ago
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Happy Birthday singer Colin Hay, born 29th June 1953 in Saltcoats.
Colin spent his first 14 years in Kilwinning but then moved to “a land Down Under” when his family emigrated, to Melbourne . At 21 he met Ron Strykert, and they formed an acoustic duo. They started composing songs for what was going to become Men at Work. After years of hard work gigging and a couple of releases in Australia the band signed for with CBS Records producer Peter McIan, and they released their debut album Business as Usual, with the hit singles Who Can It Be Now?, Be good Johnny and of course the one everyone knows, Down Under!
Men at Work quickly became MTV favourites (during the station’s early days). Since he was the group’s main singer and songwriter, Hay quickly became the focal point of the band, as such humorous videos for “Who Can It Be Now” and “Down Under” pushed the debut album to the top of the U.S. charts – making Men at Work an overnight sensation.
Perhaps sensing that they should strike again while they were still fresh in people’s minds, Men at Work went directly back in the studio to work on another album. Issued in 1983, Cargo was another sizable hit, but did not fare nearly as well as its predecessor, commercially or artistically.
Their third album in 1985, although selling okay in the states did not yield any hit singles, the band split soon afterwards.
Colin continues to make solo records and has taken to acting, appearing in some indie Aussie films, he also toured with Ringo Starr in his annual All Starr Band. If I would described Hays singing, don’t judge it by Down Under, which was a great song but didn’t challenge his voice, some of his other songs are sung much better and have a bit of a former Police frontman “Sting” to them, if you listen to some of his tunes you might hear the resemblance.
I love Colin, he has a great sense of humour, as is evident in many of his songs, Down Under is a fun tune, have a wee listen to the video I have added to this post, Are You Lookin’ At Me? again shows his humour and is a sort of autobiography in song!
In August 2021, Hay released his fourteenth studio album, I Just Don't Know What to Do with Myself. The album features 10 versions of some of Hay's favourite songs from The Beatles (Norwegian Wood, Across the Universe) Blind Faith, Del Amitri, Dusty Springfield, Faces, Gerry & the Pacemakers, Glen Campbell (Wichita Lineman), Jimmy Cliff (Many Rivers to Cross) and The Kinks (Waterloo Sunset).
The video is great crack between Colin and Craig Ferguson on The Late Show
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scotianostra · 23 hours ago
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Happy 77th Birthday crime author Quintin Jardine.
Jardine was born in Motherwell on June 29th 1945 and studied law at Glasgow University.
A varied career followed, including as a journalist, a political information officer, and media relations consultant. He gradually turned to novel writing, and his first book, Skinner’s Rules, was published in 1993. The Bob Skinner novels are set in Edinburgh, and feature deputy chief constable Bob Skinner, marketed as “Britain’s toughest cop”. There are 26 novels in the series, I’ve read about half of them, the most recent was Private Investigations in 2016. I find them okay, although not as compelling as Ian Rankin’s Rebus, Skinner is more about the procedural side of police work.
His second series of novels feature private detective turned Hollywood actor Oz Blackstone. The first of these novels was written under the pen name of Matthew Reid, but subsequent books used the Jardine name. Oz Blackstone died following the events of the novel For the Death of Me, and Jardine has continued the series but now features Oz’s ex-wife Primavera, and moved the setting to Spain.
In the Oz Blackstone novels, Oz occasionally appeared as an actor in fictional films based on the Bob Skinner novels.
He left Motherwell in 1968, and now shares his time between Gullane in East Lothian, and L’Escala on the Costa Brava in Spain. Both are settings for characters  his books, Bob Skinner and Oz Blackstone respectively.
He is married to his second wife Eileen, and has four grown-up children.
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scotianostra · a day ago
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It was a sad day for the people of Buckie when the Fishing boat Carinthia went missing with the loss of six men. The following report was read out in Parliament on the 29th of June 1979….
“Carinthia” sailed from Buckie at about midnight on 24–25 June bound for the fishing grounds off Noup Head, north-west of Orkney, with a crew of six on board.
At 1900 hours on Wednesday 27 June a lifebuoy marked “Carinthia” was found on the west side of Rousay, Orkney. This caused inquiries to be made by the coastguard to try to establish the ship’s whereabouts.
It was established that the vessel’s last known contact had been at 0900 hours on Tuesday 26 June, when “Carinthia” radioed the fishing vessel “Crimmond” that she was making for the Minches. Her position at this time was about 27 miles north-west of the mainland of the Orkneys. There was a north-westerly wind of force 8 at this time. The fishing vessel “Crimmond” was unable to regain radio contact with “Carinthia” an hour or two later.
Following the finding of the lifebuoy, coastguard and coastal radio stations in Scotland immediately broadcast an alert, and ships in the area started searching. The Kirkwall and Stromness life-boats 778 were launched, and an RAF Nimrod commenced searching at first light on Thursday 28 June in the Wick-Orkney-Shetlands area. The search area covered approximately 2,500 square miles, and it was hampered by low cloud in the initial stages. I regret to have to inform the House that, following a thorough search of the area, the search and rescue operation has been abandoned and the “Carinthia” must be presumed lost. “
There is very little online about this tragedy the men who perished were  Eddy Lawson 30 , James Lobban 52 , Murray ‘Partan’ Lobban 21 , David Flett 24 , Richard Mair 41 & Charles Cargill 28 . five of whom came from Buckie and one from nearby Findochty, the ship nor the bodies were never recovered.
Spare a thought for the friends and family of the crew who lost their loved ones.
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scotianostra · a day ago
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William “Willie” Macfarlane was born on 29th June 1889, in Aberdeen.
Willie went to the United States to become a professional at the Oak Ridge Golf Club in Tuckahoe, New York.
He participated and won in the Philadelphia Open Championships in 1921 and in the Westchester Open in 1924. His career high was when he won the U.S. Open in 1925, which was held in Worcester Country Club in Worcester, Massachusetts. Initially, he tied with Bobby Jones over 72 holes but eventually topped Jones by one stroke. MacFarlane went on to win the tournament and set a new U.S. Open single round low-score.
He continued to compete in the U.S. Open but was not able to repeat his success in 1925. In total, MacFarlane had 22 wins throughout his entire career. In 1930, he won the Metropolitan Open in the United States, as well as the Westchester Open title.
MacFarlane competed in 1931 for championship title in the Miami International Four-Ball in Florida and won. He participated again in the 1933 Metropolitan Open and also won the competition. Although he played in the U.S. Open 16 times, MacFarlane only had one more top-ten spot.
On the PGA Tour, he won a total of 21 times and won almost 60% of his matches. He topped two other golf greats, Paul Runyan and Johnny Farrell. MacFarlane also played alongside the likes of Willie Ormond, Gordon Smith, and Lawrie Reilly.
In 1967, MacFarlane died in Miami, Florida at the age of 71, he is one of Scotland’s most successful golfers and arguably the best to ply his trade in the US.
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scotianostra · a day ago
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Good Morning from Scotland 
Dawn at Quiraing, Isle of Skye 
📸Peter Woods on Flickr  
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scotianostra · a day ago
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Alf getting the supplies in for the night
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scotianostra · a day ago
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Happy 56th Birthday actress Sara Stewart, born on June 28, 1966 in Edinburgh.
Sara’s parents were from the US and she spent some of her childhood, there before joining the illustrious Royal Central School of Speech & Drama,  in London, whose former pupils include, Laurence Olivier, Vanessa Redgrave, Judi Dench and Harold Pinter.
Sara is a very hard working actress, as well a theatre work she has starred in so many well known TV series I can’t name them all but they include, Taggart (of course),  Drop the Dead Donkey, EastEnders, Fresh Meat, Holby City, Monarch of the Glen, Rebus, Unforgotten, Doctor Foster and Ashes to Ashes.
Perhaps her most famous role is that of Stella in the Channel four drama series Sugar Rush which ran for two seasons in 2005 -2006.
Of late Sara has been in  Shakespeare & Hathaway,  La Fortuna and Father Brown.
Upcoming projects include the film,  Empire of Light with Colin Firth and a TV series  Accidental Guru.
On stage Sara has played leading roles at the National Theatre, RSC, Donmar Warehouse, the Old Vic, and the Royal Court. In the West End she played Esther in The Price, Myra in Hay Fever and Claudia in Enron. She has just finished appearing in Murder on the Orient Express, directed by Jonathan Church, at Bath Theatre Royal.
Sara is a breast cancer survivor and advocates for causes that promote awareness of and fighting the disease. Her best pal in nursery and primary schools in Edinburgh was Shirley Manson of Goodbye Mr MacKenzie and Garbage. 
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scotianostra · a day ago
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Happy 48th Birthday the Bonnie Scottish actress Kirsty Mitchell.
Born in Glasgow in 1974,Kirsty is a prominent Scottish actress with a rich body of work across film, television and theatre. She trained at the prestigious Central School of Ballet in London before being crowned the coveted title of “Miss Scotland” at the age of just seventeen.
Kirstyl’s initial break-through performance came as Robert Duvall’s daughter in the film A Shot at Glory, she has since appeared in many TV shows and films including the American mini-series “Attila”, as the seductive “Princess Honoria” opposite fellow Scot Gerard Butler, Jodie Banks in the Scottish soap River City and Iona MacLean in Monarch of the Glen.
Kirsty is probably the only person to play two different regular parts in the hospital dramas, Holby City and it’s “sister” show Casualty. While most actors appearing in both shows have played the same character in crossover roles, Kirsty first showed up in Holby City in 2003, and played the part of psychiatrist Doctor Anita Forbes for 10 episodes, Kirsty is currently in Casualty as Faith Cadogan an advanced clinical practitioner. She was recently in the Irvine Welsh penned Creation Stories, the story of Alan McGee 
Other shows Kirsty has appeared in are Case Histories, The Royal Today, Hollyoaks and Silent Witness to name but a few. She also starred in the lead role of Laney in the first play written as such by controversial Scottish writer Irvine Welsh, You’ll Have Had Your Hole.
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