slashfilms

slashfilms

Im here for the horror

Horror. Slasher. Splat-stick. Exploitation. Psychological thrillers. Monster movies. A fancy pants blog for horror fans who want pretty things on their dash. This blog contains gore. Tag all of your horror stuff with #horroredit Run by Nana and Molly Sorry, we are a sideblog and can't follow back!

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slashfilms·3 years agoText

Finally got my own copy of In the Mouth of Madness and I’m absolutely stoked

This movie gets better every time I watch it

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slashfilms·3 years agoText

Let’s play a horror movie game called “how much weird shit has to happen before white people stop splitting up and exploring basements”

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slashfilms·4 years agoText

Normally I wouldn’t really respond but this is actually kind of bugging me.

First off, the gifset I made is not a gifset of iconic female revenge films. It’s a set of MY favorite revenge films, a set in which rape and revenge films do not belong. So everyone telling me that this film and that film are better or deserve to be there more is missing the point of the set that I worked on.

I didn’t exclude Rape and Revenge films just because that particular sub-genre is often filmed in an unnecessarily brutal and degrading way, or because those films make me uncomfortable (and yes, I have, reluctantly, seen those films listed in that reblog). I’m actually surprised that anyone lists Rape and Revenge films as “powerful” or “empowering”, but maybe that’s because I don’t see it as powerful, I see it as sexualized shock value and therefore didn’t include it in a set that I did the work on.

It’s not a horror movie, but look at the recent remake of Mad Max and the recent premiere season of Jessica Jones. It’s 100% certain that the Wives were raped by Immortan Joe and Jessica Jones was without a doubt raped by Kilgrave multiple times. However, you never, EVER see these scenes. You literally never witness a rape in the entire running time of each series/film and the horror is still there because the filmmakers find ways to insert horror through other scenes and other implications. You can have a horror movie without filming a 15 minute rape scene in which you see everything on screen. I Spit On Your Grave and Last House sexualize rape, either killing off the victims or leaving them empty shells because of it. It’s not empowering.

And on a final note, Carrie is about a high school teenager who suffers not only physical abuse at the hands of her mother, but also verbal and mental abuse from her classmates and often teachers. So to say that I Spit On Your Grave has a much more powerful reason for revenge than the heavy abuse in Carrie is really off.

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slashfilms·4 years agoText

My favorite horror movie theme is “guys attempt to kill people during a home invasion, are outnumbered by one woman who systematically murders them all”

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slashfilms·4 years agoPhoto

Aside from the various easter eggs throughout Krampus that connect the film back to Trick ‘R Treat, both movies contain otherwordly antagonists with motives so similar to each other, fans have theorized that Sam and Krampus are the same creature with a shapeshifting ability (or are at least related in some way). Sam, whose name originates from Samhain, enforces the rules of Halloween and punishes those who break them. Krampus, who is described as the “shadow of Saint Nicholas”, exists to enforce the traditions and cheer of Christmas, terrorizing those whose holiday spirit has been lost. Both figures are more than likely located in the same world, just in different neighborhoods, a theory that Michael Dougherty, the director of both films, has almost all but confirmed as true.

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slashfilms·4 years agoText

A remake of IT that follows the book page for page and everything is different but they still cast Tim Curry to play Pennywise

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slashfilms·4 years agoPhoto

5 “children’s” movies that are actually closer to horror films | Coraline (2009)

→ A stop-motion film that somehow managed to score a kid-friendly PG rating (despite the source material’s adult subject matter), Coraline’s horror lies in its twisted imagery, adult-centric psychological themes and a constant feeling of everything always being just a little bit off. The beginning is simple enough: a young girl, starved for affection from parents who seem too busy to give it, discovers a doorway to a parallel world similar to her own but with seemingly loving and attentive parents. Most of Coraline’s first act plays out innocently enough but then soon dissolves into darker themes that prove blood and gore is not necessarily needed to make a successfully terrifying film. The “Other Mother”, whose voice drips with saccharine sweetness, lures children into the “Other World”, trapping them and sewing buttons onto their faces in place of their eyes (“so sharp you won’t feel a thing”) and ultimately transforms into a monstrous half human, half spider hybrid. Her final transformation into something that would terrify an adult, combined with an unsettling feeling of dread throughout the film, Coraline is filled with so much Nightmare Fuel that re-branding it as a horror film is more than appropriate.
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slashfilms·4 years agoText

The Witch was a wonderful horror film, SO good.

Normally I don’t go by critic reviews but it’s currently scoring an impressive 88% on Rotten Tomatoes which is one reason I went to go watch it (very reminiscent of films like The Babadook and It Follows, both of which I love).

Fair warning that it is more of a slow buildup (very dialogue heavy) and relies more on tension and an underlying creepiness than jump scares (I only counted one jump scare near the end) but it’s an immensely beautiful film with so much going for it. The final scene is something incredible, and it’s really well put together.

Again, if you’re a fan of the faster paced films this may not be for you (it is well timed at about 90 minutes, however) but it has such great imagery, superb acting and it’s uncomfortable in the way that horror films should be. Overall it’s a solid film.

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slashfilms·4 years agoPhoto

5 “children’s” movies that are actually closer to horror films | Jumanji (1995)

→ The basic plot of Jumanji is as follows: a young boy, abused by bullies and neglected by his father, uncovers an ancient board game and, after an unlucky roll of the dice, finds himself forced to try and survive in the game’s horrific inner world for 26 years before accidentally being freed by two kids who help him finish the game. The film’s titular character is a seemingly sentient board game that is ultimately a portal between our world and a place that can only be described as some kind of Eldritch location, containing things that would otherwise never co-exist together. Releasing everything from natural disasters, plagues of creatures, and an intelligent and deranged serial killer bent on murdering the main protagonist, Jumanji’s world is insinuated to be so horrifying that it ultimately can’t be shown. It’s by sheer luck that the four main characters even manage to survive until the end of the film, seeing as how the game’s ultimate goal is to send out everything it can to keep the players from finishing it.
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slashfilms·4 years agoText

“Taking place in an abandoned asylum–”

SOLD

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