spiritusloci

spiritusloci

spiritus loci

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROBERT MEALING

Explore Tagged Posts
Last Seen Blogs
Statistics

We looked inside some of the posts by spiritusloci and here's what we found interesting.

Inside last 20 posts
Time between posts
a day
Number of posts by type
Photo
20
Video
0
Audio
0
Text
0
Chat
0
Answer
0
Link
0
Quote
0
Fun Fact

There's almost an equal split between the sexes on Tumblr - 51% male, 49% female.

spiritusloci·14 hours agoPhoto

Marble copy of John Dee’s Holy Table
MUSEUM of the HISTORY OF SCIENCE, OXFORD
https://www.hsm.ox.ac.uk/marble-copy-of-john-dees-holy-table

England, mid-1600s
Inv. 15449

In his own lifetime, the mathematician John Dee (1527–1609) enjoyed an international reputation as a scholar, and acted as an adviser to Queen Elizabeth I. However, he is now mostly famous – or rather notorious – for his ‘angelic conversations’, in which, with the help of his medium (or ‘skryer’), Edward Kelley (1555–1597/8), he claimed to have conjured a series of angels in the years between 1582 and 1589.

This was no fringe pursuit. During the Renaissance, angels were believed to retain knowledge of the supernatural reality underlying the physical world of God’s creation. Adam, and therefore mankind, had lost this knowledge when expelled from the Garden of Eden. Dee believed that through interactions with angels, he could obtain a true understanding of both the spiritual and natural realms. For him, angelic communication was as viable a method as mathematics for understanding the natural world.

Under instruction from the archangel Uriel, a brightly painted wooden table was created on which the characters of the ‘Enochian’ alphabet were inscribed. Angels could simply indicate successive letters to convey messages, which Kelley then interpreted for Dee. The original wooden table is lost; this marble copy, made nearly a century after Dee’s work, was based on a published engraving that appeared in 1659, in a volume containing detailed transcripts of Dee’s angelic consultations.

The marble copy may have been owned by the astrologer William Lilly (1602–1681), the author of a series of popular astrological almanacs and an authority on more recondite questions of angels, spirits and fairies. The copying of a Renaissance artefact shows that an interest in the occult continued into the 17th century, a period traditionally seen as witnessing the rise of inductive and experimental approaches to the study of the natural world. 

spiritusloci
16 notes · See All
spiritusloci·2 days agoPhoto

oxfordbybicycle:

Oxford by bicycle. 18 October, 2020.

Oxford Canal to Thrupp, Shipton-on-Cherwell, Enslow, Bletchingdon, and Hampton Poyle.

Taking the towpaths along the Oxford Canal is one of my favourite rides, especially if just going up to the picturesque town of Thrupp. We decided to ride few miles further and explore a few more villages that we’ve never visited before. The canal was lovely and the sense of autumn very much in the air. Riding past canal narrow boats, the scent of burning wood in the little ovens often found onboard created a very romantic sense that the seasons were indeed changing and by the time we got home I could only think of warm fires, soup, blankets and other cold weather comforts.  Another lovely day. 

Another cycling tour from my sideblog. Autumn 2020. 

spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
157 notes · See All
spiritusloci·18 days agoPhoto

oxfordbybicycle:

Oxford by bicycle.10 October, 2020.

Oxford to Charlbury, part 1.

One of my goals this year is to ride to Charlbury, a beautiful town in the Cotswolds. We rode it today, and it was such an amazing ride. So many stunning views and charming country roads through small English villages. Really breathtaking. One surprise along the way was to see the ruins of an Roman Villa (pictured above). The weather threatened rain all day, but it didn’t downpour until just as we arrived home. 

Part 1: Oxford, Cumnor, Eynsham, FreeLand, East End, Charlbury

Todays bicycle tour. Amazingly beautiful, autumnal and idyllic. Part 1.

spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
83 notes · See All
spiritusloci·18 days agoPhoto

oxfordbybicycle:

Oxford by bicycle.10 October, 2020.

Charlbury to Oxford, part 2.

We parked our bikes in Charlbury and walked around town. It’s one of my favourite villages I’ve visited in England, there are beautiful gardens everywhere and the centre of town has several old pubs and lots of independent shops. Today there was even a stall set up with free food for anyone who wanted to have some of the abundance of recent harvests of apples, pears and other fruits and vegetables. We wanted to take a different route home so went by Finstock, Long Hanborough, Yarnton, and then rode along the Oxford Canal. 

Part 2: Charlbury, Finstock, East End, Long Hanborough, Worton, Yarnton, Oxford Canal. 

Todays bicycle tour. Amazingly beautiful, autumnal and idyllic. Part 2. 

spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
spiritusloci
64 notes · See All
spiritusloci·19 days agoPhoto

St Laurence’s Church, Bradford on Avon, England

One of very few surviving Anglo-Saxon churches in England that does not show later medieval alteration or rebuilding.

spiritusloci
40 notes · See All
Next Page