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studykorean101·24 days agoAnswer

Hello, so I just started using Talk to Me In Korean and I'm still on level 1, but I wanted to ask you about something. It's probably going to sound really really dumb, but I know that Talk To Me In Korean has PDF that we can print out for each lesson so I've been printing them out as I go along with the lessons, but I've also been taking notes along with it. I wanted to ask should I still take notes when I'm already printing the PDF out? Is it even necessary for me to write them down?

Hi! Your journey is unique which means you can do whatever makes you comfortable. If you print off the PDF, you can give extra examples that you know or find. Everything you do when learning is for you! You can only print off the PDF, or you can only make notes in a journal, or you can do both! You are your own master when self-studying! Take it easy and work at your pace!

Hope this helps ~ Happy Learning :)

~ SK101

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studykorean101·24 days agoAnswer

hi love! i found your masterlist and it's been very helpful to me for some well-needed reviewing :) however i noticed that under the Verb section, if i click on "Grocery Shopping - 식료품 쇼핑" it will take me to the xmas vocab list. could this be changed? i really wanted to review grocery shopping :)

Hello! First off, thanks for your question! This has been a problem with Tumblr since the dawn of time, you are able to view the resource on the desktop application; the mobile app doesn’t like links. It doesn’t matter how many times I re-insert the links, it will still format everything under the same link in the mobile version of my Masterlist. 

A good way to get around this (at least I’ve found for the mobile Masterlist) is by clicking on the search bar of my blog and looking directly there! I can definitely go through and tag each vocab list as their own separate thing, I know that will help! 

Here it is for your convenience!

Happy learning :)

~ SK101

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studykorean101·a month agoText

Hello everyone! I have been extremely absent these past few months. We were having maintenance issues with my new house which forced me to change around my whole world. On top of that, I picked up more work due to Covid and had to start summer school. I am again starting a new session so I will continue to be less active.

I am willing to answer any questions regarding Korean in the future but my longer blog posts will be on hiatus indefinitely. Please read this post if you’d like an update on sending asks.

Love you all! Happy learning :) you’re valid and loved, stay hydrated

~ SK101

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studykorean101·2 months agoAnswer

Hi, I don’t know if you received this question before but why does 같이 pronounced something like 가치/ 갇치? Is there a batchim rule for that or I just misheard it?

Hello! No, don’t worry! You didn’t mishear it, you’re right! I did create a 받침 post that you can view at your own leisure (it has a lot of great resources at the bottom). To answer your question, it creates a “치” sound because of the vowel “이”. Here are some visuals to help:

In the batchim position, (from the correct spelling –> how it’s pronounced)

ㅌ –> ㅊ

  • 밭이 (field) –> 바치
  • 샅샅이 (thoroughly) –> 삳싸치

It’s also a lot easier on the tongue when you say 가치, rather than 가티.

받침 is difficult to understand and for some learners, who don’t have a background in linguistics, won’t be able to pick up on why those changes happen. For now, familiarize yourself with the rules of the last position in a syllable and put it into use! It will get a lot easier the more you practice! Hope this helped! If you need any more clarification, don’t hesitate to send another ask! I am always happy to help <3

Happy learning :)

~ SK101 

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studykorean101·2 months agoAnswer

can i elongate 아녕 as 안녕ㅇ? something like that? or 고마워ㅓ like that...?

Hello! Yeah, for sure you can do that! I also answered a similar ask here. So, check that out if you can! I also know that you can add the whole vowel structure and it would also make sense. For example:

고마워어어 <– like this!

Hope this helped! Happy Learning :)

~ SK101

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studykorean101·2 months agoAnswer

Hi! Can you explain the difference between 가지다, 가지고 싶다, 원하다 and 있다?

Hello! So, the main difference is in meaning:

가지다 - to have / possess something

      ☆ 파티를 가졌어요 –> We / I had a party

가지고 싶다 - to want to have something

      ☆ 저는 새 가방을 가지고 싶어요 –> I want to have a new bag (alternative translation: I’d like a new bag)

-고 싶다 vs. 원하다 [x]

원하다 - to want something

      ☆ 저는 이 아이스크림을 원해요 –> I want this ice cream

있다 - to exist 

      ☆ 비빔면이 있어요? –> you have bibim-myeon? (lit. bibim-myeon exists?)

*NOTE: while 있다 and 가지다 may have a similar meaning, it changes the tone of the sentence depending on which you use. For example:

  • 가방이 있어요 - have a bag (in the moment / as of right now)
  • 가방을 가졌어요 - have a bag (you are the owner of the bag)

It is also important to remember that 이/가 goes with 있다 

Hope this helps! Happy Learning :)

~ SK101

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studykorean101·3 months agoText

Eid Mubarak ~~ 이드 무바락 !! Last night, my Muslim friend told me to dress in my new clothes and come out of my room to eat! I had a really big exam yesterday, so she knew that I was really stressed and tired. She gave me Chicken Tikki and Chaad with some butter chicken and naan ! It was probably the best food I’ve had since quarantine started >_< she even did henna on my hand (which she said to her standards, “isn’t good” but I’ve never had it done before so I still appreciated it)!

이드 무바락 여러분 ! 좋은 주말 보내세요 ~~

عيد مبارك

~ SK101

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studykorean101·3 months agoPhoto

studykorean101:

생일 노래와 어휘 - Birthday Song and Vocab

생일 축하합니다,
생일 축하합니다!
사랑하는 (이름) 아/야
생일 축하합니다!

Translation:
Birthday congratulations x2
Beloved (name)아/야
Birthday congratulations!

Vocab:
~ 축하하다 - to congratulate
~ 생일 - birthday
~ 사랑하는 - beloved
~ 이름 - name

Other Birthday Vocab:
양초 - candles
케이크 - cake
미역국 - seaweed soup (traditional birthday food in Korea)
선물 - present
생일 축하해 - happy birthday!

Example Sentences:
1. 케이크에 양초가 몇개 있습니까? - How many candles are there on the cake?
2. 선물 고마워요 - thank you for the presents!
3. 이것은 내가 가장 좋아하는 케이크예요! - This is my favourite cake!

Enjoy this short lesson today! Eat well, study hard :)
~ SK101

For the person in my ask box! We are birthday twins! Happy Birthday <3

~ SK101

studykorean101
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studykorean101·4 months agoAnswer

hello! I'm just starting out learning korean, and I'm a little confused about how the speech levels work. so I understand there's 존댓말 and 반말 but search results show there are seven speech levels of politeness and formality and it's a little confusing. do you maybe have any links to better understand which to use when, etc? thank u in advance!!

Hello! I do have some clues as to how you can figure out the levels for yourself and I will link the resources that you can check out down below! 

For starters, you’re right; there are seven different levels of politeness / formality in Korean. You’re also right in saying that it is confusing! Generally, with beginners, it’s better to know what’s considered “formal” just by looking at the conjugation. For example, we can assume that something with “-ㅂ/습니다” at the end of the verb is considered formal. This is one of the highest levels of formalities. Or something without any formality marker (ie. lack of -요), we can assume it’s the lowest level of formalities. Below is a list of the formalities, and when to use them:

  1. 하소서체
    ♡ Most formal speech to show the most respect
    ♡ Used to address royal family members
    ♡ Also often used in the Bible / scripture 
  2. 합쇼체
    ♡ Respectful / polite form of speech
    ♡ Used for elders, strangers, customers, or in business settings
    ♡ Used for unbiased attitude
  3. 하오체
    ♡ Outdated formal speech (usually in historical [사극] Korean dramas)
    ♡ Same rank or lower
  4. 하게체
    ♡ Also relatively outdated but not uncommon
    ♡ Can be used by middle-aged adults to other adults (usually lower socially)
    ♡ Can be used by higher-ranked ppl on social ladder talking to people lower than them (Ex. CEO talking to a lower-level employee) 
  5. 해라체
    ♡ Formal speech used for the same level or lower
    ♡ Even though there’s no added respect, it’s not considered disrespectful if you use it appropriately
    ♡ It’s not as common as 합쇼체, 해요체, 해체 though it’s still used frequently
    ♡ Necessary to know this level though as it’s used to quote people
    ♡ Also known as “plain form”
  6. 해요체
    ♡ Informal but still polite speech
    ♡ This is the most common and natural speaking level in Korea
    ♡ 고마워 // 안녕하세 // 아니
    ♡ Regardless of relative rank, this level can be used politely and respectfully
  7. 해체
    ♡ The most informal / casual speech level

Here are examples of the formalities using the verb “사랑하다” - to love:

image

Even though 해라체 and 해체 are both considered “반말”, 해라체 is considered more formal (remember, “plain form”)

Next, how to use them is a little bit more difficult. I will link resources with each formality (with examples) so you can check it out for your own convenience as well:

  1. 하소서체
  2. 합쇼체
  3. 하오제
  4. 하게체
  5. 해라체
  6. 해요체
  7. 해체

Where I acquired the above resources, is a great website for Korean Language Learners. You can check it out here

I really really hope this helped in some way! I know that formalities are really difficult to grasp but once you get it, it becomes easier. Like I said above, it’s really easy to start recognizing which formality is used because of how the conjugation ending looks (you even have a bit of a hint inside the formality’s name itself). Formalities can look and sound different / confusing / difficult, but as long as you get the basics down, it becomes a lot easier with more practice. 

If you’re still confused, please shoot me a message and we can figure it out together! 

Happy Learning :) 

~ SK101

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studykorean101·4 months agoAnswer

do you know any apps or website that can download any korean ebook? i've bern wanting to read korean poetry book but idk where to find it online

I do know places to download ebooks, but the trick is that sometimes they don’t have certain pdf’s or it’s just overall really difficult to find. Just a quick search for online Korean poetry you can go here. I also found this, if that interests you. 

Otherwise, I usually use PDFdrive or Libgen

This might also be pretty useful for you: List of Korean-language Poets

When libraries open back up, get yourself a library card and browse the foreign language section! You can also look into investing if you save up the money (but if you’re like me, sometimes it’s not worth it). It might also be hard to find an anthology of Korean poetry that isn’t translated to English or romanized. If you also type in certain types of Korean poetry, that might also pop up in your search! 

I’m really sorry if you can’t find what you’re looking for, but hopefully, you can find something worth reading as an ebook in Korean! There are also other blogs that have online ebook resources in masterlist form [ x || x ]

Happy Learning :)

~ SK101

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studykorean101·4 months agoAnswer

Do you know what's the difference between 지방 (the countryside meaning) and 시골? thank you! If you're busy please take your time!

Hello! Yes, I do and hopefully, I can help you understand what the difference is, too! 

시골 - countryside / underdeveloped / usually very rural (country-bumpkin)

지방 - anything that isn’t Seoul or Gyeonggi Province

South Korea is made up of 9 provinces:

  1. 충청북도: 충청 (serene loyalty)-북 (north)-도 (province)
  2. 충청남도: 남 - south
  3. 강원도: 강 (river) - 원 (meadow)
  4. 경기도: 경기 (capital / home)
  5. 경상북도: 경상 (respectful congratulation)
  6. 경상남도
  7. 제주도: 제 (end) - 주 (island / city / province)*
  8. 절라북도: 절라 (completed network)
  9. 절라남도

*제주도 - some people don’t consider 제주도 to be a part of the nine provinces because, for the most part, the island is self-governing. 

As we can see, everything outside of the capital can be considered 지방 because it is outside of 경기도. It looks like you’re a BTS fan, and I had to look this up to double-check, but Jimin would be from 지방 because he’s from Busan and Jin wouldn’t be because he’s from Seoul. And depending on the region, the dialect can change. I have no doubt in my mind that Jin would use the Busan dialect from 경상도 사투리 to tease the two Busan members - that’s a very common thing to do for Seoul natives. 

I really hope that this answered your question! If you’re still confused, shoot me a message and I can try to explain a little more! 

Happy Learning :)

~ SK101

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studykorean101·5 months agoText

I was tagged a good while ago by @wakeupandkorean ! It seemed really fun and you guys really liked my other music rec posts [ x || x || x ]

Rules: You can usually tell a lot about a person by the type of music they listen to. Put your music on shuffle and list the first ten songs, then tag ten people. No skipping!

Here are my songs: (*YT = YouTube // SP = Spotify)

  1. Lazy - Khakii [ YT // SP ]
  2. Pictures - ECÂF [ YT // SP ]
  3. HMU (ft. Childish Major) - Arin Ray [ YT // SP ]
  4. Gwichanist - Park Kyung [ YT // SP ]
  5. ST. PERCY - BROCKHAMPTON [ YT // SP ]
  6. ENDXIETY - Dok2, Ann One [ YT // SP ]
  7. IFHY - Tyler, The Creator [ YT // SP ]
  8. Feels - Shay Lia [ YT // SP ]
  9. home sh*t home - Simon Dominic [ YT // SP ]
  10. Honesty - Pink Sweat$ [ YT // SP ]

I know that my music taste isn’t too similar to my followers but I hope you can get to know a little more about me through this mini playlist! 

I tag: @akatskui, @patrooocle, @eojetbam-studies, @a-pop-of-korean, @agingerwithaseoul, @frenchlilcoconut, @lovelearnkorean, @chloeskoreanblog, @seoulfullstudy, @whycantiusehangulinmyusername, @rachelskoreanstudyblr, @jmarcogliese

If you do it, make sure to tag me! I wanna check out the songs you guys like!

~ SK101

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studykorean101·5 months agoText

studykorean101:

In some countries, they don’t understand what’s going on, or how it’s affecting the black community. Here’s my response. I wrote it in Korean for two reasons:

1. A lot of my Korean friends are ignorant to what happens across the world, and while we may be ignorant of what happens to them, some of my Korean friends don’t hold a critical eye to the events that happen here

2. The verb 숨을 쉬다 has two meanings; to breathe (1) and to take someone’s breath away (2)

George Floyd’s breath was taken from him as he told the officers 11 times that he couldn’t breathe.

I want my black followers to know that I stand with them.

No lives matters until black lives matter. When we neglect other’s lives and struggles, we let others neglect ours. Even in Canada, my home country, police are under investigation for shoving a black woman, Regis Korchinski, off a balcony and covering it like a suicide. Her own mother watched her die.

I’m even getting emotional talking about this. I don’t want to let social issues run my blog but to be silent is to be complacent. To be silent is to be a part of the problem. I refuse to let my platform be silent.

There are many ways to show your support. You can reblog this and say their names. If you are financially capable, you can donate to reputable charities and even George and Regis’ GoFundMes.

This is a PSA for my followers that find this message hard to read, my white friends, and others in between. I know that I won’t gain traction, but this needs to be said. I won’t even add hashtags because George and Regis’ life should not be turned into a trend.

If you’re viewing this post and don’t stand for what is said (and you follow me), leave.

~ SK1

Hello All, I would just like to say in the past few days I’ve let this picture into the world without realizing a MASSIVE spelling error. I had asked my friend to proofread and she gave me the phrase on the “original” picture, while I had a different phrase. She said that this phrase was better and more natural (and since she’s Korean, I took her absolute word) but really it was everything but. When I had noticed and a few of my other Korean friends noticed, I confronted her and her excuse was that, “I don’t know much about the situation, so I didn’t know what you were trying to say.”

I take full responsibility for the incorrect promotion of the Korean phrase attached to George’s name. The “new” phrase is the one I had originally and deemed most natural from my Korean friends.

I will leave you with another phrase spoken by many Koreans who ARE educated on the subject.

흑인의 목숨은 소중하다

  • 흑인 – black people
  • -의 – possessive
  • 목숨 – life
  • 소중하다 – precious

“Black people’s lives are precious.” – it’s the colloquial term for BLM. Use it, spread it.

If you would like to support the picture that’s been replaced above with a correct, credible, and natural phrase, you can reblog it. Again, you can checkout the links I have in my reply section. Stay safe.

~ SK101

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studykorean101·5 months agoText

In some countries, they don’t understand what’s going on, or how it’s affecting the black community. Here’s my response. I wrote it in Korean for two reasons:

1. A lot of my Korean friends are ignorant to what happens across the world, and while we may be ignorant of what happens to them, some of my Korean friends don’t hold a critical eye to the events that happen here

2. The verb 숨을 쉬다 has two meanings; to breathe (1) and to take someone’s breath away (2)

George Floyd’s breath was taken from him as he told the officers 11 times that he couldn’t breathe.

I want my black followers to know that I stand with them.

No lives matters until black lives matter. When we neglect other’s lives and struggles, we let others neglect ours. Even in Canada, my home country, police are under investigation for shoving a black woman, Regis Korchinski, off a balcony and covering it like a suicide. Her own mother watched her die.

I’m even getting emotional talking about this. I don’t want to let social issues run my blog but to be silent is to be complacent. To be silent is to be a part of the problem. I refuse to let my platform be silent.

There are many ways to show your support. You can reblog this and say their names. If you are financially capable, you can donate to reputable charities and even George and Regis’ GoFundMes.

This is a PSA for my followers that find this message hard to read, my white friends, and others in between. I know that I won’t gain traction, but this needs to be said. I won’t even add hashtags because George and Regis’ life should not be turned into a trend.

If you’re viewing this post and don’t stand for what is said (and you follow me), leave.

~ SK1

216 notes · See All
studykorean101·5 months agoPhoto

Korean Mythology [pt. 1]

안녕하세요! This post was requested by lunax02, who suggested that I talk about Korean Mythological Creatures as a way to incorporate more Korean culture into my blog! This ask is brilliant and I appreciate all requests made to me (especially if you guys are super interested in it)! In order to tell you about Mythological Creatures in Korea, you first need to know where they come from! This is crucial for understanding their history and why they are an important part of Korean culture! 

This is also very exciting to me as this post (and future Korean Mythology posts) will be a collab with my friend / mutual, @patrooocle​! Dare I say, the queen of giving us Korean culture blogs. She has been so kind as to share her notes and help me through this process, so if you don’t follow her already please please do!

patrooocle’s blog // patrooocle’s twitter // patrooocle’s IG

WARNING: This post will be very long! 

*for this post, I will be using some Hanja ( 한자 // 漢字 ), anything written by me is open to criticism as I am still learning how to make it more natural and the correct stroke order and would love all the help I can get

I am using Hanja as a way to incorporate a deeper understanding of the Korean characters and their origins! It is a way to break down the literal meaning of the Korean words so we can have a better understanding of their history!

Many of Korea’s Mythological Creatures come from the Shaman religion (신교 // 神敎 ), which can be seen throughout many cultures in Asia called 무속신화 ( 巫俗神話 )

image

What is Shamanism?

Shamanism is a religion in which spirits, gods, and ancestors are praised. It is considered to be the oldest understanding of spiritual practice. Here are some key characteristics of Saman Religion:

  • there are spirits everywhere, harmful or not, they are unseen and they play a large role in the lives of those still on this plane of existence
  • certain people have a “calling”, this allows them to be able to talk to and interact with the spiritual plane
  • these people are called “shaman” ( 무당 /  巫堂 ) - they are commonly women (very few tend to be men - 박수 무당)
  • the shaman act as a medium / mediator between the human world and spirit world - you would go to a shaman if you feel as if you are being haunted with an unwanted spirit
  • a shaman helps with all spiritual aspects (healing, protection, cleansing)
image

A shaman can come in many different traditional clothes, depending on the type. There are four different types of Shaman:

1. Survival-oriented Shamans: These Shamans tend to be primitive. From the source that I was reading, they tend to be selfish and harmful! These are the types of Shaman that you see in old pirate movies (yes, the depictions can be racist and create stereotypes based on Shaman religion). 

2. Self-oriented Shamans: These Shamans are generally more popular and think of Shamanism as a “business”. This is not to say that these Shaman aren’t gifted or spiritual, but they take this to their advantage and will sometimes monetize their abilities. If I’m not mistaken, these are the types of Shaman you will often see in K-Dramas - correct me if I’m wrong (I don’t watch many K-dramas lol @eojetbam-studies​ recommended some K-Dramas aaaages ago)

3. Service-oriented Shamans: As the most empathetic Shamans in this group, they tend to serve and live a selfless life - this is where Buddhism ties into Shamanism. They don’t necessarily look to Shamanism for answers, but they let Shamanism guide them - kind of a “one-foot-at-a-time” mindset. They are great healers and communicators! 

4. Wisdom-oriented Shamans: These are the teachers of Shamanism. Their intuition helps them see “vertically” as well as see other humans as transparent. They are very trusted and respected in the community and often lead their neighbourhoods. 

*All Shaman function as a channel between the spirit world and the physical world*

There are generally two (2) ways to become a 무당;

1. You have to undergo something called “신병” ( 神病 ), which is a prolonged, mystical experience / sickness that cannot be explained. In Shamanism, the only way to recover from this sickness is to accept the presence of spirits in our physical existence. The sick pre-Shaman must then search out a senior, experienced Shaman and undergo the initiation ceremony (내림굿) where she will learn how to “channel her primary spirit” (몸주(신)). This type of Shaman is called “강신무” ( 降神巫 ) and is generally found along the Korean peninsula

2. The other way is through matrilineal inheritance; if the mother is a Shaman, her daughter will also be one. These Shamans are referred to as “세습무” ( 世襲巫 ) and live around the Han River

note: Hereditary무당 is also commonly called “심방” / “신방” ( 神房 ). This is very common in 제주도 where there are more male shamans. 

Now with the help of @patrooocle​, here are her notes on the notable deities in Korean Mythology. Not all of them relate back to Shamanism but are extremely important in terms of Korean traditional mythology and culture. 

  1. 성주 (or 성조): House Guardian God (聖 - “holy” + 主 - “host”), highest household duty. He makes sure the family is safe and the house is well kept. Generally worshipped during the first lunar month (called 상달고사 - “上月告祀”) or the 10th lunar month (called 안택 - “安宅”)
  2. 세존 (or 시준 // 시주): Buddhist household God (“世尊”). Because of its association with Buddhism, its sacrificial offerings often exclude fish and meat
  3. 조상 ( 祖上 ): the spirit of one’s ancestors. Household Gods, often worshipped by holding a 차례 ( 茶禮 ) -> an example of this is 추석
  4. 배서낭 or 배연신 (or 선왕 in Jeju Island): God who protects fishermen and brings them a bountiful harvest
  5. 문신 ( 門神 ): Gate God who keeps evil spirits from entering a home. In Jeju Island, these often take the form of a wooden fence placed in front of the house (called 정주목) instead of a portal. More generally, 돌하르방 (돌, which means “rock” + 하르방, Jeju dialect for “grandfather”) are statues (or Gods) placed in front of a house to offer protection. In the same vein, 장승 (also referred to as 법수 or 벅수 in the South) were totem poles (Gods) placed at the entrance of villages in order to scare demons away
  6. 서낭신: Patron deity of the village, it’s often worshipped through 제사 (ritual ceremony) in places specifically dedicated to 서낭신. These places take the form of cairns or trees called 서나당 (or 성황당). 서낭신 is one of the most known deities and is still worshipped in mountainous parts of Korea
  7. 도깨비: a spirit that uses their powers in order to either trick or helps humans
  8. 제석: Gold of childbirth, who overlooks the conception, birth and future of a person
  9. 삼신 어머니: Goddess of childbearing, often represented as a grandmother
  10. 칠성 (Seven Stars): the deification of the constellation 북두칠성 ( 北斗七星 ). Takes care of your health, wishes and safety. It also oversees one’s fortune

note: Shaman rituals are called “굿”

That is all for this post! We will cover more aspects of Korean mythology in the future, however, we hope that you enjoyed this post and that you’ve learned a lot! Happy Learning :) 

~ SK101 + Patrooocle

studykorean101
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studykorean101·6 months agoAnswer

hi! thank you for your blog, it's been super useful and beginner friendly and you have helped me a lot ^^ I was wondering how did you choose your korean name? and how did you decide to get one? I might study in Korea next year (if I get to study there it will be for 5 years), and I don't know if it is a good idea to have a korean name (my name is fairly long) and how to choose it if I do, should I choose a last name too? thank you so much, I hope these words find you well ^^

Hello! I am very glad that you find my blog useful, these encouraging words help keep me going! I hope you’re staying healthy and happy! As for going to Korea, that’s awesome! I sincerely hope you have a wonderful time <3

As for your question, I have talked about it a few times in the past on my blog [x], but here’s the etymology behind my Korean name:

As a disclaimer: I didn’t choose my Korean name; it was given to me after careful consideration. I don’t recommend going and choosing your name on your own unless you do the research beforehand and / or you have help from a Korean person. I say this often because there is a deeper meaning to Korean names than what you just find on a name generator - they’re culturally significant so as foreigners we should be respectful of that.
  • 금 in 한자 = “金” meaning “gold” (Jiyeon’s last name)
  • 희 in 한자 = “囍” meaning “happiness”
  • 주 in 한자 = “主” meaning “leader” derived from “公主” (공주) meaning “princess”

금희주 -> 金囍主

Korean names aren’t necessary for learners. If you have a nickname for your name in your native language, sometimes that’s good enough. But if you go to Korea and you don’t have a Korean name, it’s not the end of the world. Sometimes Korean like giving Korean names to their foreign friends, so it can be a bonding experience as you learn more about their culture!

I hope this answered your question! Don’t worry too hard about finding a Korean name! I hope everything goes smoothly and you’re able to go to Korea!

Happy Learning :)

~ SK101

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studykorean101·6 months agoAnswer
hello! I'm going to Korea soon and I look very obviously like a lesbian, I've read your post on LGBT language but I was wondering if you knew if there were any slurs i should look out for? I'm really worried someone will try and teach me a word for myself that is actually a slur lol

Hi! First of all - SUPER EXCITING! Where abouts would you be staying? Because that also matters. In my shoulders post, I talked about the different cultural standards in Korea depending on where you go. Of course, I’m not comparing the LGBTQ+ community to shoulders, that would be ridiculous - they do, however, share similar taboos in that it’s ‘scandalous’. In short, if you’re in a big city; it might be more widely accepted. Whereas, if you in a smaller city / village it might be seen negatively. 

To answer your question, a lot of the slang or slurs that you’re looking for aren’t generally used by the public (unless the person is reallllllyyyyyyy old). In my post, I do talk about how there’s a different word for transgender - one being ‘sex change patient’, which can be rude depending on the person. Someone might use that language to you. 

Now, I will caution, this vocabulary is for EDUCATIONAL purposes only. I do not support the ill use of the list I am about to give, please do not use in a negative context. I have compiled this list with the help of my Korean friends and other resources. If you find a mistake, tell me. If you’d like to add to the list, comment in the reply section:

일반 - straight
이반 - lgbtq+
부치 - butch
페므 - femme
성소수자** / 퀴어 - queer
          (**sexual minority - not common but may be used as a slur)
이쭉 (사람) - commonly used in the gay community to refer to other gay ppl
똥꼬충 - I’ve heard this means ‘f*gg*t’, but honestly I don’t know if this is true (do your thing Tumblr, if this is right or wrong tell me)

It’s a very short list, not much to it. Again, please only use these for EDUCATIONAL purposes. A lot of these phrases are used only in the LGBTQ+ community, but still, some can be used negatively. (check out my LQBTQ+ post)

I really hope you have a lovely time in Korea! Hopefully, people won’t give you too much trouble ~ Happy Learning :)

~ SK101

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