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#Antonin Artaud
hauntedbyillangelsonly · a day ago
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“I have too much contempt for life to think that any sort of change that might develop in the realm of appearances could in any way change my detestable condition. What divides me from the Surrealists is that they love life as much as I despise it. To enjoy themselves on every occasion and through every pore, this is the center of their obsessions. But is not asceticism an integral part of the true magic, even the blackest, even the most foul? Even the diabolical hedonist has an ascetic side, a certain spirit of mortification.”
—Antonin Artaud, ‘In Total Darkness, or the Surrealist Bluff’, from Selected Writings [tr. Helen Weaver]
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lifeinpoetry · 12 days ago
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I tell what I have seen and what I believe; / and whoever shall say that I have not seen what I have seen, / I now tear off his head.
— Antonin Artaud, as quoted in Meg Remy’s Begin by Telling
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thinkingimages · 2 months ago
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Theater of Cruelty means a theater difficult and cruel for myself first of all. And, on the level of performance, it is not the cruelty we can exercise upon each other by hacking at each other’s bodies, carving up our personal anatomies, or, like Assyrian emperors, sending parcels of human ears, noses, or neatly detached nostrils through the mail, but the much more terrible and necessary cruelty which things can exercise against us. We are not free. And the sky can still fall on our heads. And the theater has been created to teach us that first of all.
Antonin Artaud (1896–1948)
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moradadabeleza · 11 days ago
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Man Ray
The Hands of Antonin Artaud, 1922.
fonte : ZONE - Photography magazine
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sandmoonyelse · 3 months ago
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I remember, during an existence lost before birth into this world, having wept filament by filament over bodies of which the bones were, particle by particle, being reabsorbed into nothingness...
Antonin Artaud-1945
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garadinervi · 3 days ago
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Antonin Artaud, A Painter of the Mind, (from ‘Œuvres complètes’, Tome I, Gallimard, Paris, 1956), in Some Poems by Paul Klee, (1960), Edited and translated by Anselm Hollo, Scorpion Press, Lowestoft, Suffolk, 1962, pp. 9-10
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macrolit · 3 months ago
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As long as we haven’t been able to abolish a single cause of human desperation, we do not have the right to try to suppress the means by which man tries to clean himself of desperation.
Antonin Artaud (1896-1948) French playwright, actor, director
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leonardcohenofficial · 2 months ago
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thanks for this, antonin (from the theatre and its double)
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freelance-philosopher · 8 months ago
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There is in every madman a misunderstood genius whose idea, shining in his head, frightened people, and for whom delirium was the only solution to the strangulation that life had prepared for him.
Antonin Artaud, of Van Gogh
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24hoursinthelifeofawoman · 3 months ago
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Ce que vous avez pris pour mes oeuvres n’était que les déchets de moi-même, ces raclures de l’âme que l’homme normal n’accueille pas.”
A. Artaud, in Le pèse nerf
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hatotsah · 10 days ago
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boulevard-literario · 9 months ago
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Antonin Artaud
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elizabethanism · a month ago
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Anaïs Nin of Antonin Artaud
‘I asked him to read to me
from his book.’
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leucotoe-archive · 3 months ago
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The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (1932-1934) // Antonin Artaud (on the right) in La Passion de Jeanne D'Arc
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schizotechnics · 5 months ago
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A brief introduction to ‘Schizotechnics’
Toute l’écriture est de la cochonnerie. — Antonin Artaud, Le Pèse-Nerfs.
All writing is a filth. Not erotic filth, but grotesque, mucky, irresponsible filth. For Bataille, the writer is a culprit who must expiate himself by going beyond the limits of language and thought. 
Life is traversed by impersonal thought, thought by writing and writing by text. We are more effect than cause, and we are condemned to become-cause in order to realize an authentic artistic creation. Thus the outside is an instance of active force that pushes the subject to pursue thought: it is the chosen one and at the same time the condemned.
Bataille calls the "mystical experience" the emotional experiences in solitude of the anchorite. It is the task of those who experience these sensations empirically to express them with technique and to capture even the linguistically unattainable: the poetic pen is the most suitable for the vast enterprise of expressing the inexpressible, but my campaign wishes to take the direction of the directly material to show the evident of the Third World reality, which seems to be, paradoxically, the least evident.
I am a person who has nothing new to say, but rather a thousand things to show. I tend to think of myself as a simulacrum of Walter Benjamin, a simulacrum of a simulacrum, which undertakes its revolutionary task by painstakingly compiling different fragments that end up forming a totality. My technique is to repeat what has already been said with new approaches, a rigorous analysis of an infinite multiplicity of thoughts, to weave a rhizomatic web, to compact them as integral parts of a total assemblage, 'to take different authors by the back and give them a child, thus creating a new monster', as Deleuze claims, and open up new horizons of possibilities. I do not take authors as I please, nor do I embrace them dogmatically: my task is that of the palimpsest in order to make possible philosophies out of them. I am a subject constantly exposed to the schizophrenic flow of outside forces — as every person does — , and many times I have been brought down by these forces, not to mention the times when I have let them have their way with me. Still, I accept the guilt as a writer and take the condemnation with the risky aim of atoning myself.
I apologize in advance for the details that I might overlook in the course of time.
Schizotechnics
Finally, to conclude this introductory post regarding the ultimate purpose of the blog, an explanation of its name is required.
We must understand that 'schizo', in a purely schizoanalytic sense, is that which accelerates the rhythm of the unconscious, i.e. schizophrenia is synonymous with speed. The flows of desire, schizophrenically liberated and self-limited by capitalism, while revolutionary, exhaust the body as it resists. Although, in the span from Anti-Oedipus (1972) to What is Philosophy? (1995) we note a no small change with respect to the schizo, a shift from advocating the acceleration of the flows of desire in order to overcome the flows of desire — liberated and self-limited by the capital  — to a clamour for stability and deceleration:
We require just a little order to protect us from chaos. Nothing is more distressing than a thought that escapes itself, than ideas that fly off, that disappear hardly formed, already eroded by forgetfulness or precipitated into others that we no longer master. — Deleuze & Guattari, What is Philosophy?
There is a fatal flaw in the Deleuzoguattarian anti-capitalist project, and that is to proclaim the acceleration of the deterritorialisation of social subjectivity without any mastery of technique. Thus Schizotechnics is the management, control and domination of the tools necessary to preserve the integrity of our bodies, and at the same time, a science in constant updating in pursuit of [re]formulating optimal strategies for revolution.
Revolution haunts as an unsuspected virtuality, and schizotechnics is the only bridge capable of materializing its possibility, of turning potency into an act.
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gregorygalloway · 4 months ago
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Antonin Artaud (4 September 1896 – 4 March 1948)
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garadinervi · 3 months ago
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«Genesis: Grasp», No. 5/6, Edited by Richard Hell and David Giannini, New York, NY, 1971 [Fenrick Books, Ridgewood, NY]. Cover feat. Arthur Rimbaud, Antonin Artaud, and a photo of Theresa Stern [pseudonym for the collaborative efforts of Richard Hell and Tom Verlaine] by Charlotte Deutsch. Issue feat. Andrei Codrescu, Simon Schuchat, Bruce Andrews, Toby Sonneman, Steven Shomberg, Richard Hell, Ernie Stomach, Albert Goldbarth, David Giannini, Patty Machine,  Tom Miller, Clark Coolidge, and Yuki Hartman
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abridurif · a month ago
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On ne meurt pas parce qu’il faut mourir, on meurt parce que c’est un pli auquel on a contraint la conscience, un jour, il n’y a pas si longtemps.
Antonin Artaud
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yinedemeliha · 12 days ago
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van gogh - toplumun intihar ettirdiği.
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approaching-nonfiction · 7 months ago
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"Madness means not making sense - means saying what doesn't have to be taken seriously. But this depends entirely on how a given culture defines sense and seriousness [...] Madness is a concept that fixes limits; the frontiers of madness define what is "other". A mad person is someone whose voice society doesn't want to listen to, whose behavior is intolerable, who ought to be suppressed. [...] In every society, the definitions of sanity and madness are arbitrary - are, in the largest sense, political."
— Susan Sontag, Approaching Artaud (from Under the Sign of Saturn)
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