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#Batik indigo
fashionbooksmilano · a year ago
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John Robshaw Prints
Textiles, Block Printing, Global Inspiration, and Interiors
John Robshaw and Elizabeth Garnsey
Chronicle Books, San Francisco 2012, 167 pages, ISBN  978-1452105055
euro 28,00
email if you want to buy [email protected]
Design enthusiasts and armchair travelers will love circling the globe with celebrated textile designer John Robshaw. From batiks in Java to ikats in Thailand and indigo printing in India, Robshaw reveals the lush inspiration behind his signature style while highlighting step-by-step block printing techniques from local artisans and masters. Robshaw provides a rare glimpse into his creative process, wherein he blends traditional methods with his own painterly style for entirely unique creations, and shares tips for incorporating textiles into any space. Brimming with beautiful photographs of covetable textiles, far-flung destinations, and eye-catching interiors, this luxe fabric-covered book is an eclectic visual tour of the rich tradition of textile printing.
31/08/20
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dandelion-head · a year ago
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While looking into sashiko, I inadvertently came across shibori, an ancient Japanese method of resist dyeing, usually with indigo.
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And it looked really familiar.
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Oh!
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Ohhhhh!
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offalteeth · 3 years ago
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shibori indigo ! Dyeing in a one bedroom apartment isn’t easy, but I got away with it! Cant wait for these to dry. Both are about 45x45", with the water ripple one being a little longer. The one has my first batik test with a heated pen. Would be FAR easier on flat fabric, but I love the little uneven ripples on the stuff I used.
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sawanasia · 3 years ago
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Vintage Handwoven Hmong Natural Batik Hemp Dress
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chezvies · a year ago
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Excited to share this item from my #etsy shop: Indigo Blue Paisley Indian Batik, Indigo Indian Cotton Fabrics, Creepers Paisley Design Fabrics #sewing #indigobatik https://etsy.me/3fVjTqy
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harpoonataventure · a year ago
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Indigo Batik (contemporary)
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wtxch · a day ago
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Susanne Wenger (Austrian,1915-2009)
Oduduwa Creation Myth, 1963
starch-batik, indigo dye on textile
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keepingitneutral · 4 years ago
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Tonga Batik Kiss from Timeless Treasures
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kaalbela · 4 months ago
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Dabu or daboo is an ancient hand block printing technique from Rajasthan, India. The designs are hand printed on to the fabric using blocks which are dipped into fast dyes. Next, ingredients like mud, gum, lime and waste wheat chaff are combined to make the ‘dhabu’ or mud resist paste which is then patted over certain parts of the design. This covering essentially protects these parts of the fabric from the dye used later on, creating a unique and colorful effect. After the process of printing, the fabric is spread out in the sun where it completely dries out. It is then dipped into a vat of dye, dried again and finally given a thorough washing to remove the paste and any excess dye. The dyes used are typically natural vegetable dyes and pastes. Thus the unprotected parts of the fabric catch the color while the dhabu covered bits remain plain. The fabric may be dyed more than once in different colors to give each part of the design a different hue.
Traditional daboo prints are made with natural dyes like kashish (grey-brown) and indigo (blue), as well as yellows and reds derived from fruits like pomegranate. Fabrics can also be dyed more than once, creating the double dabu and triple dabu effect with a richer, more colorful look. The typical motifs used are nature-inspired ones of peacocks, mangoes, leaves, cornstalks, sunflowers and animal figures. Geometric shapes, dots and wavy lines may also be used. The designs thus created are repeated over and over again all over the fabric. Sometimes, the mud paste cracks and leaks, creating a distinctive vein like effect similar to Batik.
1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 | textile series
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handweavers · 23 days ago
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i want to learn indian block printing sooo bad i want to learn batik printing i want to make a huge indigo vat and stick everything i own in it
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mybeingthere · 2 months ago
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Another sublime creation, Hmong style, indigo dyed cotton, double sided, dark blue pleated batik at the top, totally satisfying in shape as a gorgeous wheel.
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