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#Costume Magazine
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Historical dramas have such beautiful costumes but the makeup always irks me.How am I supposed to think that it is 900 years ago with that smudged liner,under eye shadow placement,gel brushed filled in brows,smooth thick foundation and twenty different shades of lipstick on every character.
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boxofdelights · 7 days ago
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Mollie King - Photoplay Magazine - 191
Mollie King – Photoplay Magazine – 191
Mollie King (born Mary Josephine King; 16th April 1895 – 28th December 1981) was an American stage and screen actress. She married Kenneth Deedes Alexander. Nellie King, sister of Molly and Mary Miles Minter acted respectively as maid of honour and bridesmaid.
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boxofdelights · 13 days ago
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Mary Pickford - The New Eve magazine - May 1926
Mary Pickford – The New Eve magazine – May 1926
  marypickfordarchive
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360magazine · 14 days ago
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Star Trek: Mission Chicago
Star Trek: Mission Chicago
ReedPop and ViacomCBS Consumer Products Unite to Produce  STAR TREK: MISSION CHICAGO in Spring 2022 ReedPop to Beam into the Windy City for Star Trek: Mission Chicago on April 8 -10, 2022 ReedPop, the world’s leading producer of pop culture events, announced today that they are joining forces with ViacomCBS Consumer Products as the official convention partner for the Star Trek franchise. The…
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boxofdelights · 16 days ago
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Mary Pickford - Motion Picture Magazine, July 1914
Mary Pickford – Motion Picture Magazine, July 1914
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mired-in-halloween · 18 days ago
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You’re Not Yourself On Hallowe’en
When You Masquerade in Crepe Paper You Are a Witch, a Ghost, A Cat, or Perhaps a Sprite
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unes23 · 23 days ago
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Josephine Skriver by Olivia Frolich for Costume Magazine
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boxofdelights · a month ago
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Don't be distracted tomorrow is Vintage Sunday
Don’t be distracted tomorrow is Vintage Sunday
  The Star Vibrator – Photoplay Magazine June 1920
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hauntedbystorytelling · a month ago
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A scene from the lost film "The American Venus" (Frank Tuttle, 1926). Published in Film Fun, June 1926. | src internet archive «Lady in the left window: I wonder why Helen of Troy had such a reputation for beauty.» « Lady in the right window: Why, that's easy to see. She got all her clothes from Paris.»
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unes23 · a month ago
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Josephine Skriver by Olivia Frolich for Costume Magazine
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unes23 · a month ago
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Frida Aasen by Janne Rugland for Costume Magazine
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boxofdelights · a month ago
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Olive Thomas - Motion Picture Magazine - 1917
Olive Thomas – Motion Picture Magazine – 1917
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hauntedbystorytelling · a month ago
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Eine Bückeburger Jungfrau mit Kranz, UHU Magazin, Januar 1934. Band 10, Heft 1. | src UHU magazine
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professorpski · a month ago
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She May Be Painting, But Where’s Her Smock? March 1880
Every volume of Peterson’s Magazine in 1880 offered fiction (lots of it), news, poems, recipes, music, fashions, and needlework projects. And each issue had a printed color engraving called “Les Modes Parisiennes,” with some description, this one “The Amateur Artist” which is silly. No woman would have sat in that dress with a palette full of paint in one hand. She would have worn a protective smock to keep the paint off her clothes.
Notice all the clearly drawn details. You can see easily that at “House-Dress of Grey Camel’s Hair” at center has the same pleated detail in silk at the back of the collar and the back center hipline as well as at the hemline of the sleeve. Soft pleats mark the skirt and draping the skirt back. And don’t forget the two layers of knife pleated gathered at the hem one grey and one white. Similarly, the “Carriage-Dress of Soft Claret-Colored Silk”  is trimmed with knife pleating and back draping, but that is about all we see of it because of the black silk mantle over it which has fringe and braid trim. Knife-pleating also appeared on the hemline of the house-dress to the right which was cream with red and gray brocade, and then with cream silk for all the details. There were certain trends that were popular, yet all kinds of variety in the details at cuff and collar that differed. 
It is an extraordinary amount of information between the image and the description which was the point. Both professional and amateur dressmakers could think about how it was made, whom it would suit, and whether they wanted to make it too. This was the only color fashion image, but there were pages of black and white sketches for similar which were similar and for sale through the magazine as sewing patterns. This was how fashion news traveled around the north Atlantic world, and how a woman from a small town in the U.S. might be thinking about Paris fashions.
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unes23 · a month ago
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Frida Aasen by Janne Rugland for Costume Magazine
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