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#Knights of Solamnia
oldschoolfrp · 12 days ago
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Raistlin, Caramon, Earwig Lockpicker, and Sir Gawain free a ghost bound to a ruined keep (Larry Elmore, from Dragonlance story “Raistlin and the Knight of Solamnia” by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, Dragon 154, February 1990)
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wafflelovingbatgirl · 4 months ago
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So I’m almost done with book 2 of the first Dragonlance series & this is how I think you become a Knight of Solamnia.
Step 1: be a man whose father was a knight. Only men can be knights, after all
Step 2: find a good stout stick and shove it up your ass, but not so far you can’t bow respectfully to women and nobility
Step 3: Knighthood
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raistlin-archmagus · 10 months ago
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Krynn Be Like
Cleric: We are staying out of this situation
Knights of Solamnia: We are ignoring this situation
Mercenaries: We are dealing with this situation
Mages: We… might have started this situation
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commanderbragh · 3 years ago
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Ancient Solamnic Death Chant
Return this man to Huma’s breast Beyond the wild, impartial skies; Grant to him a warrior’s rest And set the last spark of his eyes Free from the smothering clouds of wars, Upon the torches of the stars. Let the last surge of his breath Take refuge in the cradling air Above the dreams of ravens, where Only the hawk remembers death. Then let his shade to Huma rise, Beyond the wild, impartial skies.
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wearepaladin · a year ago
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Linsha Majere of the Blue Rose, Knight of Solamnia by Elena Zambelli
Est Solarus oth Mithas
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sharry-arry-odd · a month ago
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The knight had often tried to resolve within himself why he accepted Tanis's leadership. He was nothing more than a bastard half-elf, after all. He did not come of noble blood. He wore no armor, carried no shield with a proud emblem. Yet Sturm followed him, and loved him and respected him as he respected no other living man. Life was a dark shroud to the Solamnic Knight. He could not pretend to ever know or understand it except through the code of knights he lived by. /"Est Sularus oth Mithas"/– "My honor is life." The code defined honor and was more complete and detailed and strict than any known on Krynn. The code had held true for seven hundred years, but Sturm's secret fear was that, someday, in the final battle, the code would have no answers. He knew that if that day came, Tanis would be at his side, holding the crumbling world together. For while Sturm followed the code, Tanis lived it.
Dragons of Autumn Twilight, by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman
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captzexx · 22 days ago
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send 🪢for the mun to write a muse not yet shown on this blog!
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"Est sularas oth mithas," Gareth smiled as he spoke raising his cup to his old friend.
"Wut dos tha mean?" Nori replied as he lifted his own to return the toast to the middle aged knight.
"It's the saying of my order," Gareth ripped his ale with a sigh as before setting the cup back to their makeshift table, adjusting his cloak as he sat upon the rock. "My honor is my life."
The dwarf grunted as he sat as well, his rummy eyes looking out into the quiet road that lead toward the Grey Havens. The two soldiers had long since sat as guard and patrol of this sacred road, but had grow quiet as the Fourth Age blossomed to herald the end of the Third. It was solemn and lonely task but one they took serious in the closing days of the Eldar.
Gareth Ironwing smoothed his mustaches a he rested his hands on his knees as they pair slipped into comfortable silence. This was how it went most days, quietly waiting and watching for signs of trouble. Rogue orc warbands, the occasional highwayman, or even a pack of wildlings trying to waylay the retreating elf kind. More often then not it was more about maintenance of the highway, but for ancient dwarflord and repentant knight it was much a path for redemption as it was a final duty.
(Gareth Ironwing was a Solamnic Knight I pulled from Dragonlance that I pulled into a massive Tolkien roleplay group. They were very apprehensive of letting me play him as such but they found I slipped in just fine and didn't distrupt play or the lore of the world. To them he was just a human knight from the South but for me was my love letter to Sturm Brightblade. He was a lot of fun to play as a would be writer at 14. He lived, fought, and died for Ered Luin.)
@jacobdcheshyre
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thomas-g-newman-blog · a year ago
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A Knight of Solamnia at the setting of the sun.
‘My Honor Is My Life’
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kendertales · 7 months ago
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Canticle of the Dragon Hear the sage as his song descends like heaven's rain or tears, and washes the years, the dust of the many stories from the High Tale of the Dragonlance. For in ages deep, past memory and word, in the first blush of the world When the three moons rose from the lap of the forest, dragons, terrible and great, made war on this world of Krynn. Yet out of the darkness of dragons, out of our cries for light in the blank face of the black moon soaring, a banked light flared in Solamnia, a knight of truth and of power, who called down the gods themselves and forged the mighty Dragonlance, piercing the soul of dragonkind, driving the shade of their wings from the brightening shores of Krynn. Thus Huma, Knight of Solamnia, Lightbringer, First Lancer, followed his light to the foot of the Khalkist Mountains, to the stone feet of the gods, to the crouched silence of their temple. He called down the Lancemakers, he took on their unspeakable power to crush the unspeakable evil, to thrust the coiling darkness back down the tunnel of the dragon's throat. Paladine, the Great God of Good, shone at the side of Huma, strengthening the lance of his strong right arm, and Huma, ablaze in a thousand moons, banished the swarm of her shrieking hosts back to the senseless kingdom of death, where their curses swooped upon nothing and nothing deep below the brightening land. Thus ended in thunder the Age of Dreams and began the Age of Might, When Istar, kingdom of light and truth, arose in the east, where minarets of white and gold spired to the sun and to the sun's glory, announcing the passing of evil, and Istar, who mothered and cradled the long summers of good, shone like a meteor in the white skies of the just. Yet in the fullness of sunlight the Kingpriest of Istar saw shadows: At night he saw the trees and things with daggers, the streams blackened and thickened under the silent moon. He searched books for the paths of Huma, for scrolls, signs, and spells so that he, too, might summon the gods, might find their aid in his holy aims, might purge the world of sin. Then came the time of dark and death as the gods turned from the world. A mountain of fire crashed like a comet through Istar, the city split like a skull in the flames, mountains burst from once-fertile valleys, seas poured into the graves of mountains, the deserts sighed on abandoned floors of the seas, the highways of Krynn erupted and became the paths of the dead. Thus began the Age of Despair. The roads were tangled. The winds and the sand storms dwelt in the husks of cities, The plains and mountains became our home. As the old gods lost their power, we called to the blank sky into the cold, dividing gray to the ears of new gods. The sky is calm, silent, unmoving. We have yet to hear their answer.
Michael William’s for the Dragonlance Chronicles 
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greenedera · a year ago
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Linsha Majere, Knight of Solamnia of the Order of the Blue Rose, - from  Dragonlance  - is proudly watching the dragons of good flying in the sky. Her faithful owl is keeping an eye on you! photoshop - July 2020 Here a link to my Dragonlance gallery: www.deviantart.com/elenazambel…
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dmsden · 2 years ago
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By My Oath - Personal Plot for Paladins
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Knights in shining armor. Lawful stupid. A moral compass. A pain in the ass.
Paladins have been part of the D&D game for a long time, first appearing in the Greyhawk supplement for original D&D. All the way through 3rd edition, they had to be Lawful Good, which made a lot of people dislike them, since they were often the one preventing the party from torturing or killing prisoners, fighting dishonorably, stealing and looting, and other fun activities. The portrayal of Sir Osric the Chaste in the movie Gamers: Dorkness Rising is a classic "Lawful Stupid" paladin, and the other players clearly hate having him along. As of 4th edition, paladins can be of any alignment, which might have helped people get over their dislike of them. In 5th edition especially, however, they are still bound by an Oath that defines their behaviors and powers.
Each Oath is so different from the others that each one is likely to have its own sort of quests to follow. In this article, unlike previous personal plots, we'll take a look at each Oath and give a few ideas for storylines that might fit that concept.
The Oath of Devotion is very much a classic knight in shining armor, calling for the paladin to act very much as a chivalrous member of Arthur's Round Table. I think this is the perfect place to begin looking for inspiration. An Oath of Devotion paladin could be going on quests for a liege lord, defeating evil knights, rescuing those in need, seeking out lost holy relics, and the like. You might decide that there are orders of knighthood in your campaign, perhaps taking inspiration from Dragonlance's Knights of Solamnia. Perhaps your paladin wants to work up through the orders, achieving higher ranks of knighthood, eventually becoming one of the king's "peerless companions" or something of the like.
An Oath of Conquest paladin is almost the opposite of this ideal. They could be the lawful evil version of the same, following a tenet of might makes right, a lawful neutral knight who wants to wipe chaos out altogether, or a lawful good knight who truly believes that by establishing an iron rule over others, they can make the world a better place. Quests for such a paladin could involve vanquishing the forces of chaos, defeating other knights in order to conquer their lands, putting down rebellions for their liege lord, or seeking things that will make them more powerful - the better to bring order to the world.
Oath of Redemption paladins have a crazy road ahead, because they've chosen to seek violence only as a last resort. Their powers and spells are much more geared for defense and protection. I could see a Redemption paladin working as a diplomat, trying to make treaties with goblins, orcs, and the like. They could be atoning for something in their past...perhaps they were a villainous character or minion, but now they have forsworn that path for a new one. Perhaps there is a holy quest, such as recovering the Cup and Talisman of Al'Akbar and returning it to a shrine of Lathander, that will ultimate guide them to their own redemption, freeing them from the bonds of an infernal contract. It's worth noting that the party should probably be aware of the presence of such a paladin and be cool with it. It definitely calls for a different style of gaming than the norm.
The Oath of the Ancients Paladin fights for the green, living world, kindling hope and protecting beauty. These paladins can definitely raid the Druid's wheelhouse for plot elements, protecting sacred groves, slaying forces that seek to corrupt the natural world, and protecting those around them. Perhaps an Oath of the Ancients paladin serves a fragile elven kingdom, seeking to protect it from any encroaching evil that haunts its woods. Quests against hags would seem to be a particularly appropriate choice for these paladins.
A paladin who follows the Oath of the Crown is tied strongly to civilization, serving a king, a nation, or law in general. They could be called upon at low levels to pacify a group of bandits, to slay a marauding monster that threatens a small village, or to rescue a local lord from the forces that threaten his rule. As they gain in levels, they might break up slaver rings, face an encroaching army of gnolls head on, or champion a king's cause in a tourney. At the highest levels, they should face threats that threaten the kingdom, if not reality itself. Chaotic primordials, demons, and the like make excellent foes for such a paladin.
THe Oath of Venegeance has story built into its very core. What was the event that caused the paladin to swear such an oath? What is the core wrong that such a paladin longs to right? I jokingly call this the Batman oath, because I could easily see a character modeled after the Dark Knight. Perhaps the vengeance that needed taking has long since been taken - the parents are avenged or what not. Perhaps that brought the paladin no satisfaction, and now they ride to bring vengeance for the sake of everyone who could not get it for themselves. A town raided by worgs, a family who lost a loved one to drow kidnappers, or a community suffering under a tyrannical dragon can all expect aid from an Oath of Vengeance paladin.
I hope this has you thinking about plot for the Paladin in your game. Paladins are great, flavorful characters who deserve love...and plot.
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meldelen · a year ago
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Dragonlance’s Lost Chronicles I: Dragons of the Dwarven Depths - A rambling review
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Cover art by Matt Stawicki depicting Tanis Half-Elven, Flint Fireforge and Tasslehoff Burrfoot, three of the main characters.
By now I should be rereading the second trilogy of the Dragonlance Tales, but I couldn’t resist and started with this trilogy of The Lost Chronicles which, to my eternal shame as Dragonlance fan, I didn’t even know it existed until a few months ago during confinement, when I decided to re-explore this beloved franchise of my teen years. The Lost Chronicles is a relatively recent trilogy - year 2006 - if we compare it with the first original trilogy, Dragonlance Chronicles (1984) that complete each other. Those who have read the Chronicles will remember that after finishing the first volume - Dragons of Autumn Twilight - in the second, Dragons of Winter Night, the authors made a temporary leap omitting part of the story - due to lack of time and creativity, they admitted at the time - in which the main characters’ group was recovering a sacred relic from the Dwarven nation of Thorbardin, The Hammer of Kharas, in exchange for providing protection and accommodation to refugees driven from Solace and enslaved by the Dragon Highord Verminaard. Well, precisely, this what the first volume of The Lost Chronicles is about, written no less than 20 years later, to complete this and other gaps in the original plot.
I have to say that on one hand I was excited to find this trilogy written to complete the original, and on the other hand, I was skeptical about it. Because writing decades later to complete something you had already done usually results in a grievance compared to the original work; it seems unlikely that something better will be done so long later; and unless you go with the lead feet, reread your original work VERY WELL and have a good publisher, it’s very likely to fall into contradictions and inconsistencies in the plot.
Well, nothing of that! This book is great! Not only have the authors recovered the original spirit of the Chronicles, but also - at the risk of being burned as heretic at the bonfire of fandom - they have improved it, and how! On the other hand it is logical, because writers are supposed to improve with time if they care for what they do, and let's not forget that Weis and Hickman are also the authors of that wonderful series called The Death Gate Cycle, which it is totally on another level. All that experience of years has been invested now and it shows.
How does it show? The pace of the plot, for example. The Chronicles, specially the first volume, had a very stressful rhythm - it was like climbing a roller coaster without harness - while Dragons of the Dwarven Depths has a sensible and constant pace, dosing the action and the dialogues in a balanced, fluid and consistent way. Secondly: it’s much better written than the original trilogy, both in terms of prose and setting. They take more time to describe the environments and the lore without becoming tedious, boring, or too hasty as sometimes happened in the original trilogy. Of course, the poems of Michael Williams are still horrible - or perhaps it is the translation that is horrible, I will give him the benefit of the doubt -; that issue seems to be doomed.
And finally I stop at what has always been, for me, the best of Dragonlance and the reason why I love it: the characterization. It has always been wonderful, and in this volume it shows. The Companions, very different in their origins, abilities and personality, have always fascinated me because they seem absolutely human and relatable, believable although many of them are not "humans" per se or have supernatural abilities, of course. They are supposed to be childhood friends and allies of their own free will in a world at war, but they actually malfunction as some kind of dysfunctional family, if I may allow redundancy. The mean-spirited and grumpy dwarf messes with everyone and scolds them all like a curmudgeonly grandfather, the others handle him making him believe that his decisions matter and his intervention is essential to them, the knight won’t stop annoying everyone with his ideals of honor and justice, lecturing them on what is right and good and cooperating rather little when it comes to making morally questionable decisions, the mage messes with everyone and everyone messes with the mage, who reacts like a furious snake because he’s aware that without him they would not make it to the corner alive, and in the absence of a real culprit, his fangs always end up stuck in his poor twin - an actual cinnamon roll, an example of the most tragic Stockholm syndrome -; the barbarians distrust everyone but they have no choice but to get along with them, the kender is, if possible, the most chaotic element of the group, whose burden and responsibility are passing each other as if they could really control him somehow; all of them led by a half-elf with remorse of conscience because he’s a disbelieving atheist who cannot even make up his own mind about if he feels elf, feels human, feels everything or feels nothing, and is not able to choose if he is in love with the elf girl or of the human girl, having enough work with babysitting this sociopathic group. Anyway. A delight for the senses.
Already experts in handling such a bunch of misfits, Weis and Hickman make you laugh hard at the interactions between them. In the Chronicles it wasn’t yet quite funny - especially if you hadn’t gotten used to Raistlin's mood, whom you’ve to swallow in little doses like a bitter medicine - but here, you’ve a great time! The knight annoying the mage, the mage messing with the knight, the two messing with the dwarf, the dwarf messing with everyone, the kender in the middle messing around... it seems incredible that these people saved the world, right? Well, they did! And even though they can’t totally get along, without a single one of them it would not have been possible. There, the greatness of the story.
I don't want to wind up much more. In this volume, the authors take the opportunity to correct other failures their original narrative had, such as devoting more attention to Riverwind, who plays a fantastic role as leader of the refugees - at the cost of casting a shadow over Goldmoon and therefore obtaining the inverse result of the original trilogy - and also, to pay a little more attention to poor Tika - the most human and perhaps most relatable of them all, although unfortunately she’s forgotten, like Goldmoon, halfway through the book - and above all, pay much more attention to Flint Fireforge, the dwarf, who’s really the main character of the book, and who finds himself faced with a moral dilemma: recover the sacred relic of the dwarves, the Hammer of Kharas, and hide it from his own people to take it to the Knights of Solamnia and therefore be used as an artifact to solve the war and give the world in danger of destruction a chance; or willingly return it to the dwarf nation and risk losing it to the cause.
5 stars. Great. Fantastic. It’s not boring for a single moment, there is no tedious, long or unnecessary part, the characters are genuinely themselves, the plot is better written and the style much improved. In short: it seems that time has not passed at all, or rather, it has passed, but for good. Highly recommended for Dragonlance fans and especially for those who are already familiar with the Chronicles. You will not regret it.
Geez, I need to shorten these reviews.
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dumbass-transboy · a year ago
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Boy oh boy do I have a D&D story for you today!
For the record, I play a very anxious human fighter and the rest of the party is made up of a stabby Kenku rogue, an elf fighter who likes to seduce everything, a human Druid who you can envision as a human-sized squirrel, a human warlock of Cthulhu who collects body parts, an elf monk with no personality, and a halfling monk.
Now onto the story
We were traveling to a large city to gather their army (the Knights of Solamnia) to prepare for an incursion of cultists with dragons that had reached the entire continent except the region of Solamnia. This part is pretty uninteresting except for the human fighter (Hiraeth Sauril) trying to teach the Kenku rogue (Rathen) to use carpenters tools and failing horribly.
We came across a small town that was being sieged by a band of orcs, ogres, goblins, and wargs that were overwhelming a few low ranking Knights of Solamnia. Of course, we decided to jump into the fray and helped fend off the warband before speaking to the leader of the knights we’d fought alongside.
His name is Derek Crownsguard and he is, unfortunately, important
Derek was very grateful that we helped and offered us a place in their camp for the night, it was a fairly tame conversation until Rathen wandered up to say hello. This motherfucker had the nerve to tell us to keep our “bird monster” in check! Needless to say, Rathen gets a bit stabby, so Hiraeth picked him up to make sure Derek stayed intact. Hiraeth explained that a cult of Takhisis called the Dragonarmy had brought dragons back to the world and that we needed to rally the Knights of Solamnia. Derek laughed at us and said that “I think I would know better than you lot if dragons had returned” (I’d ask you to keep in mind that Hiraeth was formerly of the Dragonarmy). He then proceeded to comment to the elf fighter about how ragtag our group looked and mention Hiraeth multitude of burn scars by calling him kindling.
Needless to say, Hiraeth wasn’t about to let this stand even though he’s taken a lot of shit from a lot of people. Hiraeth chewed out Derek and narrowly stopped himself from actually getting physical with this motherfucker. Derek apologized (in the way that implies that we were still at fault, mind you) and explained to us that we needed a sponsor to talk to the higher ranking Knights of Solamnia. He told us he’s happily sponsor us if we helped him clear out a keep full of orcs. The elf fighter took over negotiations while everyone else set up camp and Hiraeth had a panic attack in the cart.
Once we got everything set up and Hiraeth was calmed down, everyone was super proud of him because that was the first time he’d ever stood up to anyone or defended himself since he has social anxiety and self-worth issues. I’m also super proud of my boi because he’s getting better! Rathen was not allowed to stab Derek but we’re debating letting him once Derek is no longer important.
TL;DR, An NPC was so stuck up and xenophobic that the fighter with social anxiety snapped BUT it led to a soft character moment so I guess it’s fine.
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gamesmasternotes · 2 years ago
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I’m getting all of my notes together, because come 2020 I will be running a D&D campaign which will likely be a long running one - Dragonlance!
THis is one of my favourite settings, as I remember reading the old novels by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman when I was very young. I can probably credit them with the first tiny spark in my soul which eventually became a fully fledged tabletop roleplay and D&D enthuasiast. So having the chance to go back to them and run the original Chronicles story - the opening trilogy in what became hundreds of novels in the setting - is fantastic.
This is the basic briefing on the world I’ve so far given my players:
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THE WAR OF THE LANCE takes place in ANSALON, a continent on the world of KRYNN. The world's major gods are the High God and his children: good Paladine, neutral Gilean, and evil Takhisis, opposed by Chaos, who seeks to destroy Krynn. Evil chromatic and the good metallic dragons are things of legend, and tied to the gods as divine beings. Humans are Krynn's most common humanoid race, but Elves, Dwarves, Kender, Gnomes, and Minotaurs occupy the world as well. Clerics derive magical powers from their gods, and wizards derive their power from the three moon gods.
At this point in history, it has been three hundred years since the Cataclysm obliterated the great empire of Istar and changes the entire surface of Krynn. The Age of Despair followed, during which the gods were entirely absent, having left behind the world they felt had abandoned and shunned them. The disrespect of the Kingpriest went on, ignoring the thirteen warnings sent, convinced by his own hubris that only he – a mortal – could defeat evil.
The gods sent a “fiery mountain” to completely destroy Istar and the Kingpriest, the impact shattering other areas of Ansalon, drowning some areas and raising new mountains. Following that, contact with the gods was cut off entirely.
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The group I’m running for are currently neck-deep in a long Call of Cthuluhu game, just stepping in to what I’ve been told is the third and final act of Horror on the Orient Express, which is why I’m making sure my notes are together now and ready to go next year. It gives me time to go over my plans and make sure of what I’ve got and what needs adapting. Anyone with Dragonlance experience is of course welcome to offer advise, but the crux here is that the last time the setting had rulkes was D&D 3rd edition. We want to play 5th. So some adaptations need to be made.
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If you’re actually one of my players, this is where you should STOP reading.
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As the narrative of Chronicles goes, five years ago a group of friends would frequent the Inn of the Last Home in the treetop city of Solace. Having adventured together for some time and grown weary of the actions of those serving the new religions since the Cataclysm, they made a pact to separate. Each would take a different path and travel Ansalon searching for some sign of the true gods, agreeing to meet back in that inn five years later.
I plan to start my party at Lv5, as brand new characters of their own devising. They will completely replace the Innfellows in the narrative of the War of the Lance, starting the game with their return to the Inn of the Last Home after their five year journey. My plan is that the world will exist as though the classic set of characters never existed. After their original encounters and the introduction of the Blue Gem Staff, the party will be visited by none other than Raistlinn Majere. He will explain that HE has erased his own cohort from history, because they FAILED to defeat the Darkness. As such, he has twisted time using forbidden magics to give another group of characters a chance to succeed.
Its quite a twisting of the ending of the Chronicles trilogy, and I should point out for those who have read other books in the series that I am basing this SOLELY on the mythology of the Chronicles trilogy (so assuming Legends, etc has not happened yet).
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In order to make it work of course, some changes need to be made. Dragonlance, the world of Krynn, the continent of Ansalon, are not the same as Faerun, Eberron, etc. Different races have prominance, others are more common than in other places, and some are outright unheard of (because they didn’t exist in D&D at the time Dragonlance was being written and developed). So in terms of races, these are the changes being made:
The most common races, those developed more in the stories, are Humans (Civilized and Nomadic, Elves (Qualinesti, Silvanesti and Kagonesti), Dwarves, Gnomes, Kender (Halflings), Centaurs and Minotaurs.
Rare but accessible races in clude Half-Elves and Half_Ogres (Firbolgs and Goliaths).
Very rare races, with my apporval only, include Kyrie (Aaracokra), Phaethons (Aasimar) and Thanoi (Loxodons).
Races I’ve banned outright, because they are to be used as purely evil or isolationist races, include Dargonesti  (Sea-Elves and Tritons), Ogres, Orcs, Half-Orcs, Goblins, and Hobgoblins.
I have also banned Dragonborn, Lizardfolk and Kobolds as player races, because there will exist only as the evil Draconian race.
Other races which are never mentioned in the Dragonlance stories (as far as I know) are a tricky question I haven’t addressed yet. I’ll probably base my decision on them on whether someone can come up with an interesting concept for them in the game world. These are of course the Tieflings, Gith, Genasi, Changelings, Kenku, Kalashtar, Tabaxi, Shifter, Yuan-Ti, Warforged and Tortles.
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Some alterations also need to be made to character classes before we begin, as some are represented very differently within the world of Dragonlance, and need addressing.
Mostly everything can stay the same, the key difference being however a complete lack of Divine Magic at the start of the story.
As Chronicles begins, the gods do not grant power to any beings on Krynn. The restoration of that link is part of what the Chronicles story is about - finding the old gods and trying to get them to come back, and dealing with the one or two who already have.
As such, I’m putting in the rule that as the story begins, no Cleric or Paladin has Spellcasting, or any other healing ability. The exception of course, will be if one characters WANTS to play a Cleric, then they will find themselves as the chosen wielder of the Blue Gem Staff, the first artifact of the gods to be seen on Krynn in three hundred years, which LETS them use their class spellcasting ability. This helps kick the party into the narrative too.
As part of this though, I’m making the world a little harsher. There is a point in the story at which Divine Magic does return should the party choose to do as the original Innfellows did and make it happen (at Xak Tsaroth). However I am ruling that no spellcaster can use any healing or divine-influenced spells until this event occurs (or something like it at least).
As part of that, seeing as there are no gods and no truly god-like beings on Krynn, I’m ruling that no levels can be taken in the Warlock class until this event occurs (because there are no beings around to be a Patron other than the central villain of the narrative!).
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The final note in my planning is based in Paladins, which I think need a full re-flavouring. My intention is that Paladins will stand-in as the Knightly Orders of Ansalon, very intentionally to allow something special should somoene wish to affiliate with the Knights of Solamnia (such as Sturm Brightblade in the novels). I think the concept stands well for them, and makes the Knights more than just Fighters. The spellcasting part of the class makes it a bit weird though, which is what I think needs adjusting to make it fit. I think the Healing restriction I already mentioned will help itigate it, but I will likely have to strip down the spell list for Paladins and maybe replace a few spells entirely with new ones. This way I can make every spell they have more of a martial ability than an explicit spell, which would work nicely for the Knights of Solamnia. I might even be able to flavour each new rank in a Paladin’s Oath as rising to a new Order within the Knights.
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I’m very interested to know what other people think, and waht advice they’d give based on this framework. People with better knowledge than I might be able to offer new ways to address a few of the alterations I’ve made, and hopefully I’ll have it all organized in a good, structured way and ready for when the game begins next year.
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oldschoolfrp · 3 years ago
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The High Clerist’s Tower, fortress of the Knights of Solamnia, damaged after battle (from AD&D Dragonlance module DL9: Dragons of Deceit by Douglas Niles, 1985, modified from an undamaged tower on the map sheet for DL8: Dragons of War; interior art for both modules credited to Diana Magnuson with cartography by David Sutherland)
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dlthrack · 3 years ago
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Palanthas
   Palanthas. The Jewel of Solamnia. Named for the god Paladine by Vinas Solamnus himself, the city grew and thrived for over 1500 years. Even the Cataclysm barely shook the city’s foundations. It wasn’t until the Summer of Chaos, when the titanic god was released from the greygem and unleased his horrible minions upon Krynn did the city fall. Not to the legions of Chaos, but to the Knights of Takhisis. Some say the defenders of Palanthas were weakened and distracted by the war with Chaos and that’s why the dark knights were able to conquer the city with almost no effort. Others say the gods themselves made a deal with Takhisis so that her followers had full sway of the continent of Ansalon. Whatever the reason, the Knights of Takhisis occupied the city, deposed the ruling council and placed high ranking dark knights in positions of power. Although the city still acted as the largest trading hub in all of Ansalon, the presence of the dark knights definitely affected the populace. Non-human traders and citizens, especially elves, were seen less and less.    The Knights of Neraka (formerly the Knights of Takhisis) controlled the Lordcity of Palanthas for more than 40 years. During that time, they forged an alliance with Khellendros, the Dragon Overlord that declared the region of Solamnia his domain. Soon thereafter, the Tower of High Sorcery, which had stood in the same spot since before the founding of Palanthas, disappeared leaving only a perfect circle of black glass in the center of the Shoikan Grove. Jenna of Palanthas, formerly a red robed member of the Conclave of Wizards, despite the loss of her magic and the tower of High Sorcery, did what she could to resist the Dark Knight occupation, including teaching the newly discovered wild sorcery, which was outlawed by the knights.    Then came The Great Storm. The Knights of Neraka were united under a new general, Mina. In her wake, the ancestral homelands of the elves were either destroyed or occupied, and three of the Dragon Overlords, including Khellendros, lay dead. Mina’s victory over Ansalon was nearly complete, but it was revealed that the One God that she worshipped was actually Takhisis, who had stolen the world away from the other gods. When the gods returned and enacted their justice upon Takhisis, the Knights of Neraka had lost both their patron deity and their greatest general. The knights shattered into factions and immediately started losing cities and territories. The Knights of Solamnia, bolstered by the return of their gods, started a campaign to retake Solamnia. Starting with the Southlund city of Caergoth, the Knights of Solamnia started pushing out the now broken dark knights. After re-taking the High Clerist’s Tower, preventing the dark knights from getting reinforcements by land, the Solamnic Knights began working with the citizens of Palanthas and the wizard Coryn the White to remove the Dark Knights once and for all. The coup happened quickly, with the Solamnic Knights sweeping the guilds, docks, garrisons, and gates. The battle ended when the Lord Knight of Palanthas, Knight of the Lily Elstone Kinsaid, was slain.    Change happened quickly after the Dark Knights were routed. The ruling council was reinstated, with gaps filled by the Knights of Solamnia or their allies. The High Warrior of the Crown, whose knights recently started worshiping Shinare the god of commerce, became the master of coin and the head of the Bank of Palanthas. The position of Lord Knight, historically filled by a Knight of Solamnia, has remained vacant. The current citizen members of the ruling council, along with a vocal group of nobles, believe that the Solamnic Knights already have too much influence over Palanthas politics and they are keeping the seat vacant. To spur growth and trade, the one thing the citizen and knightly rulers of Palanthas were able to agree on was the creation of a civilian Chamber of Commerce. One of the many creations of the Chamber was the Adventurers Guild. The last 45 years were hard on Palanthas and the world, and there is much work for someone willing to sell their proficiency with the sword or spell book. By making the Adventures Guild an official and organized effort, the ruling council can insure a certain level of quality and professionalism in the mercenaries hired. They have even made deals with certain inns within Palanthas where adventurers can stay and where new jobs can be posted. One such inn is the Notched Axe, recently refurbished in Old Town and operated by two old adventuring companions, the dwarf Barsal Blackhorn and the human Gwendoline Willden.
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tediousreviews · 3 years ago
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The War of the Lance
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Dragonlance time again.
Ten stories and a poem. The opening and closing stories this time are both from Weis and Hickman. By having the stories set around the time of the War of the Lance, the authors have a chance to dig into some of the events that didn't quite make it into the original trilogy. It's a nice touch, and made nicer by only touching a few of the stories.
Raistlin and the Knight of Solamnia, Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman
Raistlin's an interesting character. He was morally ambiguous from the start, and hardly anyone trusted him. And it wasn't terribly surprising when he betrayed his friends and joined the forces of evil. What was surprising, in a way, was that he wasn't motivated by jealousy or resentment or bitter anger over the mistrust he faced. No, his friends were right about him all along, it was pure ambition. He never went through a dramatic change, he just grew a bit more firm in his convictions.
That means stories like this, that take place before his turn, let the authors show off his softer side a bit more than normal without fundamentally changing his character.
What can I say? I liked it.
Dead on Target, Roger E. Moore
Our hero dies. And then he gets angry. And then he gets revenge. And then he rests in peace.
War Machines, Nick O'Donohoe
A teenaged girl with a massive crush on a Knight of Solamnia risks her life to find the gnomish weapons that could destroy their dragonarmy enemies. She gets all that and a nice little bonus besides.
The Promised Place, Dan Parkinson
It's a gully dwarf story. Actually, it's the story that set up The Gully Dwarves. And it works much better than that did for me, mostly by virtue of being shorter.
Clockwork Hero, Jeff Grubb
Gnomes are terrible inventors. In many more senses of the word terrible than one. But they're not that bad at inventing stories when it comes right down to it. And really what's a hero but someone with a sword and the right story? It turns out there's at least one gnome with a real talent for inventing heroes.
I shouldn't have liked the thing with the love interest. It was a bit too cute. But I liked it.
The Night Wolf, Nancy Varian Berberick
With enough magic, you don't have to be a werewolf to be a man who turns into a wolf. But that doesn't mean it isn't still a curse.
It's a good story. But there's nothing about it that needed to be set near the War of the Lance, or needed to be a dragonlance story, or even a D&D story at all. I don't know if it was written for this collection or not, but if not then good job finding a home for it.
The Potion Sellers, Mark Anthony
The placebo effect is a wonderful thing. Sometimes even if it shouldn't be effective, a medicine can still be exactly what you need.
The Hand That Feeds, Richard Knaak
In a world where there are multiple, jealous, vindictive gods who can each grant some but not all miracles, it can be difficult to know how to balance your reverence and your tithes for best effect. A merchant gets an object lesson on that topic that he'll never forget.
The Vingaard Campaign, Douglas Niles
One of the things that didn't make the cut in the Chronicles trilogy was the story of how exactly Laurana almost single-handedly turned around the war. This story, told in bits and pieces of collected history from journals, only gives a view from 10,000 feet. But it's still a nice view.
The Story that Tasslehoff Promised He Would Never, Ever, Ever Tell, Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman
I think I'm supposed to sympathize with everyone's frustration over Tasslehoff's complete inability to keep a secret. But honestly those idiots should have all known better. And if instead of spouting off cryptically and then nodding at each other's shared understanding, they'd actually spelled things out for him, then his inability to keep a secret wouldn't have been a disaster in the making.
Final Thoughts
Nice.
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commanderbragh · 3 years ago
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Canticle of the Dragon
Hear the sage as his song descends like heaven's rain or tears, and washes the years, the dust of the many stories from the High Tale of the Dragonlance. For in ages deep, past memory and word, in the first blush of the world When the three moons rose from the lap of the forest, dragons, terrible and great, made war on this world of Krynn.
Yet out of the darkness of dragons, out of our cries for light in the blank face of the black moon soaring, a banked light flared in Solamnia, a knight of truth and of power, who called down the gods themselves and forged the mighty Dragonlance, piercing the soul of dragonkind, driving the shade of their wings from the brightening shores of Krynn. Thus Huma, Knight of Solamnia, Lightbringer, First Lancer, followed his light to the foot of the Khalkist Mountains, to the stone feet of the gods, to the crouched silence of their temple. He called down the Lancemakers, he took on their unspeakable power to crush the unspeakable evil, to thrust the coiling darkness back down the tunnel of the dragon's throat. Paladine, the Great God of Good, shone at the side of Huma, strengthening the lance of his strong right arm, and Huma, ablaze in a thousand moons, banished the swarm of her shrieking hosts back to the senseless kingdom of death, where their curses swooped upon nothing and nothing deep below the brightening land. Thus ended in thunder the Age of Dreams and began the Age of Might, When Istar, kingdom of light and truth, arose in the east, where minarets of white and gold spired to the sun and to the sun's glory, announcing the passing of evil, and Istar, who mothered and cradled the long summers of good, shone like a meteor in the white skies of the just. Yet in the fullness of sunlight the Kingpriest of Istar saw shadows: At night he saw the trees and things with daggers, the streams blackened and thickened under the silent moon. He searched books for the paths of Huma, for scrolls, signs, and spells so that he, too, might summon the gods, might find their aid in his holy aims, might purge the world of sin. Then came the time of dark and death as the gods turned from the world. A mountain of fire crashed like a comet through Istar, the city split like a skull in the flames, mountains burst from once-fertile valleys, seas poured into the graves of mountains, the deserts sighed on abandoned floors of the seas, the highways of Krynn erupted and became the paths of the dead. Thus began the Age of Despair. The roads were tangled. The winds and the sand storms dwelt in the husks of cities, The plains and mountains became our home. As the old gods lost their power, we called to the blank sky into the cold, dividing gray to the ears of new gods. The sky is calm, silent, unmoving. We have yet to hear their answer.
Dragons of Autumn Twilight Novel by Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman Poetry by Michael Williams
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Bold What Applies To You: DragonLance Edition
You like Chronicles more than Legends
You like Legends more than Chronicles
You like them both equally
Your favorite Chronicles character is: Tanis, Caramon, Raistlin, Tika, Sturm, Goldmoon, Riverwind, Flint, Laurana, Fizban, Gilthanas,Tas, Kitiara, Bupu, Other
You think Kitiara was the villain
You dislike Tanis
You ship Raistlin/Crysania
Your favorite type of mages are: White Robes, Red Robes, Black Robes
Pick one: elf, dwarf, or kender
You secretly hoped that Takhisis would triumph
You want to be a Knight of Solamnia
You think kender are annoying
Silvanesti or Qualinesti
Solace or Palanthas
You preferred Raistlin when he was a Red Robe
You prefer Raistlin as a Black Robe
You don’t like Raistlin
You feel bad for Caramon
You love Dalamar the Dark
You’ve read DragonLance: The Second Generation
You’ve read Dragons of Summer Flame
You’ve read The Annotated Chronicles and/or Annotated Legends
Your favorite DL book wasn’t written by Weis & Hickman
You’ve read 10+ DL books
You’ve read 20+ DL books
You’ve cried while reading a DL book
You’ve yelled at a DL book while reading it
You’ve written DL fanfiction
You’ve drawn DL fanart
You’ve convinced someone to read the series
You started reading DL when you were 16 or younger
DragonLance was your first fandom
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