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#Kwon Hae-hyo
365filmsbyauroranocte · 10 days ago
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In Front of Your Face (Hong Sang-soo, 2021)
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brand-upon-the-brain · 19 days ago
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In Front of Your Face (Hong Sang-soo, 2021)
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ouugg · 10 months ago
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We’ll all become ghosts anyways.
Fukuoka (후쿠오카), dir. Zhang Lu (2020)
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cinemaronin · a month ago
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In Front of Your Face (2021)
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당신얼굴 앞에서 In Front of Your Face (2021) directed by Hong Sang-soo cinematography by Hong Sang-soo
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abs0luteb4stard · a year ago
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WATCHED
FINALLY!
Lee Jung-hyun was like Sarah Connor in this movie. Badass.
Lee Re & Lee Ye-won are such clever young actresses.
Lee Re had a cool role to play. Even if her high speed driving was exaggerated and CGI, her facial expressions and everything made it believable!
Enjoyable, clever in-universe film, but Train to Busan had more burning tension. I hope there will be another sequel or in-universe stand alone film like this.
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lamiaprigione · a year ago
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The day after (2017)
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olivierdemangeon · 5 months ago
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HOT YOUNG BLOODS (2013) ★★★★☆
HOT YOUNG BLOODS (2013) ★★★★☆
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View On WordPress
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shitstheysaid · 2 years ago
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sanniee · a year ago
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my thoughts on Train to Busan:PENINSULA
This is a mini-rant about the movie because the content we have on Tumblr at the moment is...not much. I will try not to spoil anything because that is not the point. I just want people to get into it understanding its motive. 
I want to start by saying that I liked this movie a lot actually. I do not want to compare it with the first but put them side to side so I can see the picture the directors tried to create.
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Train to Busan went in two directions: 
1. The working man in today’s society who is so focused on their job that they forget about the most important things in life
2. The man who is confronting a life and death crisis who has to fight to save themselves and the ones they love no matter what. 
Both movies are about people in danger who, instead of fighting together to eliminate the risk, start racing against each other with only one thing in mind: ‘’May the best one survive’’. These movies are not about people fighting zombies but about humans fighting humans. 
GOD HAS FORSAKEN US-in the beginning of the movie was about the humans stuck there, not about those who lost their lives.
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Peninsula took onto the second direction and explored the territory of the man who has lost his humanity. Those stuck on the peninsula slowly lost their hope, and after the hope was gone, they started losing their humanity. We, as humans beings, have goals, and we are driven by those goals. Stuck in a place where money and status don’t matter, where your safety is not granted, where you have no connection with the outside world, how would you react? No motivation, no certainty, surrounded by death and filth, our conscience would degrade to the point where compassion and empathy will no longer exist. 
There’s nothing left to the ex-military division stuck on the peninsula. They have nothing. They hope for nothing. They stopped waiting for salvation. Therefore, they just retorted to the origins. They became worse than cavemen. They hunt, they take pleasure in seeing the weak/those who aren’t in their tribe suffer and die. Great example of how the human mind copes with trauma.
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The action scenes were great and carried by three women, something that you don’t get to see often. Feminism at its finest, men and women fighting equally with everything they have. Not a hint of sexism. It made sense that they brought the guns out now. If the first movie was about regular people trying to live, this one was about trained individuals fighting.
The cons would be that I wished for more gore because the genre is horror. The themes were frightening enough tho so I’ll let it slide. The production was decent, the CGI as well. The atmosphere their induced was thrilling, but I was expecting some more suspense. I wished for some more backstory on the characters and for some more detail about the life on the peninsula. 
I wouldn’t give it a 10, but a 7.50/10 would be the justified score. It was a decent, entertaining movie with a fascinating approach on life, death, and humanity and an overall enjoyable experience. 
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vivisadumbass · a year ago
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spoiler-free peninsula review: a zombie movie on the outside, a chaotic, forced tear-jerker on the inside
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Peninsula (2020) is a zombie action thriller movie by director Youn Sang-ho, who is best known for his masterpiece Train to Busan (2016). Peninsula is the sequel of Train to Busan, revolving around our protagonists trying to leave South Korea, which has turned to an inhabitable land with the undead roaming everywhere. Despite the whole hype on how it is the sequel of one of the greatest zombie movies of all time, Peninsula falls short, and comes across as lazy, as if the movie was produced just for the sake of garnering money. Here is my review of the rather disappointing movie Peninsula.
Although disappointing, some aspects which I was impressed were the action sequences, choreography and the car chase scenes. When the audience followed Jung Suk (Gang Dong-won) during action scenes, it was pretty evident that there were a lot of effort poured into filming and preparing for the very scene. Car chase scenes were also very impressive, with many people saying that it was reminiscent of the scenes in Mad Max: Fury Road (2015). The way the movie actively engaged the audiences in the car chase scenes with vehicles drifting and slamming zombies was honestly enjoyable. 
Though, I have to say that I wanted more terrifying zombie fight scenes, and was overall disappointed for how the movie digressed away from its fundamental setting. The reason why Train to Busan worked was because of the apocalyptic fear the zombies gave when an individual is trapped in a limited space for survival. Add the tear-jerking element using the bond between a father and a daughter and boom, you got yourself a surprisingly terrifying yet emotional zombie movie. Peninsula on the other hand, simply had these zombies merely almost as “extras,” which was disappointing and honestly beat the whole purpose of it being a sequel for Train to Busan. What’s the point if we don’t feel the fear of these people becoming the undead? What’s the point of it being advertised as a zombie movie... when it isn’t really a zombie movie? If the director wanted the movie to focus more on the man vs. man aspect instead of the man vs. zombie aspect, was it necessary to advertise this movie as a sequel to an amazing zombie movie? 
The performances of the actors were unfortunately pretty average. Despite the appearance of well-known actors such as Gang Dong-won and Lee Jung-hyun, none of them seemed to be actually conveying the raw emotions these characters were going through. Especially for Gang Dong-won, I was honestly pretty disappointed by his performance in the film. Despite his impressive performance in, for example, The Priests (2015), It seemed like his eyes didn’t convey any true and raw emotions, and his dialogues rather felt forced and faked. Along with the rather disappointing acting, because the scenario itself was bland with very vague character development and narratives, it must have been difficult for these actors to actually get themselves into the characters’ shoes. If the writer had taken more time on actually building up a stronger narrative for these characters, I’m sure they would have been able to convey those emotions and actually move the audiences’ heart. 
One of my biggest problem with the movie is the scenario. Everything felt so loose, with specific scenes trying to make the audience tear up, as they did with Train to Busan. The only problem is that they force the audience to tear up, when in reality the already builded narrative is too bland for the audience to even put themselves into the shoes of the characters. (K신파 씨발) I personally felt the narrative of the characters themselves were discussed too little, with the movie only brushing the top of the relationship between the characters. And this led to me not being able to fully immerse myself into the movie and actually sympathize with what the characters are going through. Additionally, characters, including villains were unfortunately all very forgettable. The movie overall felt rushed with very cliche moments, making me wonder if the movie really was worth getting invited by the Cannes.
Peninsula should have not been advertised as the sequel of Train to Busan. It being a sequel only makes the public compare the two movies even more, which downgrades Peninsula as a whole movie. I think it was too much of a gamble for the director to put this movie out as the sequel of Train to Busan, for in reality, Peninsula failed to fulfill the audiences’ expectation of another tear-inducing, emotional zombie thriller. And if I am being truthfully honest, I am pretty frustrated by how directors and producers might presumably have purposefully advertised Peninsula as the sequel of Train to Busan just for the sake of money and publicity. I regret spending my money and time on watching such lazy production. 
Although having the potential to be the next amazing zombie movie of South Korea as the sequel of Train to Busan, Peninsula falls short with vague characters and rather bland and cliche scenario. Taking into consideration that Peninsula is a sequel of Train to Busan, Peninsula made me think, “Was a sequel really necessary?” With lazy producing, Peninsula was overall a disappointing and lackluster thriller. 
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dear-science · 10 months ago
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“In the film, So-dam says, ‘let’s not become tense.’ I think relationships are all about this -- letting go of the strained emotions and just being who we are.” - director Zhang Lu on depicting human relationships in Fukuoka (2019)
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365filmsbyauroranocte · 10 days ago
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In Front of Your Face (Hong Sang-soo, 2021)
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brand-upon-the-brain · 19 days ago
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In Front of Your Face (Hong Sang-soo, 2021)
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ouugg · 9 months ago
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I would’ve run away too if I were her.
Fukuoka (후쿠오카), dir. Zhang Lu (2020)
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k-star-holic · 8 months ago
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Kwon Hae-Hyo, Bright Smile
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gregor-samsung · a year ago
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강변 호텔 [Hotel by the River] (Hong Sang-soo - 2018)
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kdram-chjh · a year ago
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Korean Movie: Train to Busan 2 / Estación Zombie 2 / Península (2020) | dir. by Yeon Sang-Ho
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hiddenbyleaves · a year ago
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The Day After (Hong Sang-soo, 2017)
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shitstheysaid · a year ago
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enterfilm · 2 years ago
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GANGBYEON HOTEL (Hong Sang-soo, 2018)
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