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#Mythos Articles
mythosblogging · 10 days ago
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In many cultures, ravens, crows, and magpies are most commonly associated with death, trickery, and misfortune. In Britain, the magpie is a creature of superstition, and to see a single magpie is to invite bad luck, as immortalised in the popular folk-rhyme ‘one for sorrow, two for joy.’ There are a variety of ways to allay this misfortune – tipping your hat, spinning three times, saluting, or saying the phrase ‘good morning, Mr Magpie, where’s your wife?’ indicating that there is a second magpie nearby. This is one of Britain’s most enduring superstitions, and there are still people, to this day, who are unable to see a magpie without saluting. Magpies often mate for life, so a single magpie is thought to be widowed, which may have led to the legends about its unluckiness.
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mythosblogging · a month ago
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For centuries, tales of a ginormous cephalopod lurking in the ocean and rising from the deep to crush ships with its gargantuan tentacles have been used to scare sailors and explain missing ships. Crypto-zoologists will tell you that the oceans are deep, and unexplored, and that there could still be any number of ‘mythical’ creatures waiting to be discovered – even the dreaded Kraken. But where did these myths come from? And is there any truth behind them?
In its earliest form, stories of the Kraken come from Scandinavian mythology, specifically the areas around Norway and Greenland. Its name derives from the Norse word, Kraki, meaning twisted, and in its earliest iterations it was often described similarly to either a whale, or a giant crab.
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mythosblogging · a month ago
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Corvids, a genus of birds ranging across the world whose number include crows, ravens, and magpies, play significant roles in a variety of global religions. In Chinese Folklore, once a year flocks of magpies form a bridge to allow tragically separate lovers, Chang’e and Houyi to meet again for just one night. In some legends of the Russian Koryaks, the Raven-God Kutkh is responsible for creating the lands and rivers and lakes. Tales of the Lenape people say the Rainbow Crow once made an arduous journey into the heavens to beg fire from the gods in order to see his friends through a harsh winter. During the journey back, the soot of the fire stained the crows beautiful multicoloured feathers a stark black.
While these particular legends paint these birds as the heroic, selfless creatures completing arduous tasks for the wellbeing of others, or at least morally ambiguous (as was the case of Kutkh, who either willingly gave the world the sun and the moon or had to be tricked into releasing them depending on which version of the legend you read) there are many other legends that paint them in a far darker light.
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mythosblogging · 18 days ago
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In honour of the most recent instalment to the Marvel Universe, with the Disney+ show, Loki, This week, we're taking a look at the actual god that the character is based on.
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