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#Pat Frank
paul-and-jer20 hours ago
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Hollywood or Bust advertising photo 馃様 How much beauty and elegance!
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thoughtkick2 days ago
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I love you. I worry about you. I wonder whether I tell you enough how I love you and want you and need you and how I am diminished.. when you are not with me and how I am multiplied when you are here.
Pat Frank, Alas, Babylon
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shotty6 days ago
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We got to sit down with brave space captain Pat for an exclusive interview!! He talks music, games, pandas, and everything in between 馃槑
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shotty8 days ago
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I got to sit down with Miles for an interview (yes, THE Miles)!! Let鈥檚 check in with our favorite drummer and see what he鈥檚 all about.
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shotty9 days ago
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Are we having fun yet?? 馃槅 Seriously though I can鈥檛 tell. It鈥檚 either fun or anxiety, perhaps a tasty mixture of both.
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shotty13 days ago
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Pat got to play some old Soviet arcade games at a museum in Russia! Did he win? Nobody knows 馃構
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shotty15 days ago
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We got to sit down for a chat with DJ Mochi! He鈥檚 responsible for the wonderful 鈥業 Wanna Get to Know You鈥 remix, available now on Spotify! 馃槏
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thecomicon15 days ago
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Springtime In The 'Dale: Previewing 'World Of Archie Jumbo Comics Digest' #108
Springtime In The 鈥楧ale: Previewing 鈥榃orld Of Archie Jumbo Comics Digest鈥櫬#108
World of Archie Jumbo Comics Digest #108 drops this week from Archie Comics with a brand new classic-style story 鈥楽marter Than A Refrigerator.鈥 Featuring the talents of Francis Bonnet, Pat Kennedy, Tim Kennedy, Glenn Whitmore, Jim Amash, Jack Morelli, Jeff Shultz, Rosario Tito Pe帽a, and more, WoAJCD #108 hits the stands on Wednesday, April 07, 2021.聽 鈥楾he Lodges have a brand-new smart鈥
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dweemeistera month ago
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Movie Odyssey Retrospective
Alice in Wonderland聽(1951)
There is an abandoned building at 1127 E 31st St. in Kansas City, Missouri. That 1922 building, made up of red brick and mortar, would have met the wrecking ball long ago, if not for its historical value. For one year, it housed the Laugh-O-Gram Studio, founded by Walt Disney and the first job in animated film for several people who would become instrumental in shaping the American animation industry. Alongside Disney, the Laugh-O-Gram staff included:
Ubbe 鈥淯b鈥 Iwerks, who co-created Mickey Mouse and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit with Walt. Ub stayed with the Disney studios as an animator or special effects specialist through Mary Poppins (1964);
Hugh Harman and Rudolf Ising, who founded Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies with Warner Bros. in the 1930s under producer Leon Schlesinger, later moving to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM);
and Friz Freleng, who joined Harman and Ising and Warner Bros and MGM as principally a director, while introducing or developing most of the central Looney Tunes characters.
All of these figures would shape the environment for animated talkies into the midcentury. But Laugh-O-Gram could not survive the financial obstacles that led to the studio鈥檚 closure after only a year. Go back and watch the Laugh-O-Gram shorts and you will find imaginative, rowdy stories paired with movements as fluid as animators not named Winsor McCay (1914鈥檚 Gertie the Dinosaur, 1918鈥檚 The Sinking of the Lusitania) could draw in the early 1920s. Laugh-O-Gram鈥檚 last film, Alice鈥檚 Wonderland (1923), was never released commercially to the public and 鈥 considering its hybrid of animation and live-action footage 鈥 demonstrates the influence McCay had over Disney and his fellow animators.
Later in 1923, Walt submitted Alice鈥檚 Wonderland to Margaret Winkler, whose Winkler Productions was the leading animated short film distributor of the time. Winkler had just fallen out professionally with Pat Sullivan, the co-creator of Felix the Cat. Needing a quick replacement and charmed by the animated frenzy surrounding the hybrid animation/live-action Alice, Winkler signed Walt Disney and his Laugh-O-Gram team (including child actress Virginia Davis) to produce the Alice Comedies short film series (1923-1927, including 1923鈥檚 Alice鈥檚 Wonderland) in Hollywood. These films, Disney鈥檚 first taste of commercial triumph, shared little resemblance to Lewis Carroll鈥檚 novels Alice鈥檚 Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, except for the curiosity of the title character and the fantastical situations she might find herself in. After the end of the Alice Comedies series and the formation of Walt Disney Productions (now Walt Disney Animation Studios), Walt wished to adapt Carroll鈥檚 books 鈥 which he had been familiar with since his childhood in Missouri 鈥 into a feature film. Outside forces delayed the project, including the box office failure of Paramount鈥檚 live-action Alice in Wonderland (1933) and the creative and fiscal burdens that his studio had to bear during World War II.
During this time, Walt resigned himself to the fact that any animated adaptation of Carroll鈥檚 novels, more interested in illogic and wordplay than any sensible storytelling, would not reach the artistic heights of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). His long wait to adapt Alice in Wonderland as a feature film would end in 1951, with the film co-directed by Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, and Hamilton Luske. A stellar voice cast, mixture of storybook and unusual animation, and an acceptance of its own absurdity make Alice in Wonderland one of the best non-Golden Age Disney animated features.
Alice (voiced by Kathryn Beaumont) is a child, probably ten years of age give or take. She is one of the youngest protagonists in Disney鈥檚 animated canon and a rare human female lead without monarchical ties or aspirations. Her story is simply a fantastical dream of her subconscious鈥 creation. Thus, freed from the limitations and expectations of the 鈥渞eal world鈥, Alice in Wonderland 鈥 and the novels it was adapted from 鈥 is an episodic series of nonsensical encounters of the various characters that inhabit Alice鈥檚 Wonderland. This posed a dilemma for the Disney animators and the army of writers on the film. How does one make Alice, whose only notable characteristics include her na茂vet茅 and incurable curiosity, a more interesting character than what Lewis Carroll wrote? With the animators and writers finding no answer, Disney鈥檚 Alice is just as reactive (as opposed to proactive) as Carroll鈥檚 characterization for her. Inane things happen to and around her, infrequently because of her own initiative; anyone expecting the studio鈥檚 first female lead to write down names, possess a sharp wit, and kick ass might need to recalibrate said expectations given the source material.
This discourse wades into questions about literary fidelity in cinema 鈥 no standard formula exists for how literature should be adapted to a film. To adapt Alice鈥檚 Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass as faithfully as possible would be to invite structural and tonal chaos. Carroll鈥檚 numerous poetic asides, extremely abrupt (and, to me, exhausting) tonal shifts, and his near-complete dedication to exposition whenever nonsense is not present does not make for a digestible film. The Alice in Wonderland that audiences have enjoyed since 1951 presents its developments far out of any Carroll鈥檚 narrative order. The tone and individual moments remain Carroll-esque, but, upon release, British critics savaged the film for degrading Carroll鈥檚 best-known works (more on this later). Yet by my judgment and familiarity with Carroll鈥檚 books (which, to reiterate, are not concerned about character development) Disney鈥檚 animated version is the best cinematic adaptation in line with the Carroll鈥檚 artistic intentions.
Alice in Wonderland聽is best seen as a quasi-Disney package film filled with one-upmanship in its animation. A distracted Walt was barely aware of day-by-day developments during production, and thus did not rein in some of the animated excess Alice in Wonderland is now justly acclaimed for. For the second consecutive entry in the Disney animated canon, Mary Blair鈥檚 concept art (1950鈥檚 Cinderella, 1953鈥檚 Peter Pan) is principally responsible for what the background animators would adopt. In the bookend scenes outside Wonderland, the lush, foliage-filled backgrounds recall her work during Disney鈥檚 package era, and are easily the most 鈥渞ealistic鈥 backgrounds since the inimitable Bambi (1942). Once the film descends into Wonderland, the background animators, attempting to convert her concept art into cel animation, attempt (but fail to) replicate the characteristic flatness of her concept art.
But for everything else integral to Blair鈥檚 artwork 鈥 the lack of straight lines, highly stylized architectural and natural features, and detonation of colors 鈥 the background animators (who would be assigned specific scenes) faithfully render her style as closely as they can without completely making Alice in Wonderland a modernist phantasmagoria. The film is an overload of colorful experimentation. Just choose from any one of the scenes involving the White Rabbit鈥檚 house, the Caterpillar鈥檚 toadstool hideaway, the tea party, or the Queen of Hearts鈥 domain and one is subject to a visual cacophony of inspired production design and artistic audacity. It can be overwhelming, but Wonderland鈥檚 locales represent some of the greatest examples of settings-as-character in almost all of animated cinema.
Alice鈥檚 Wonderland, however, is nothing without the characters that dwell within. Some of the most impressive character designs of Disney鈥檚 mid-century animated films appear in this film, thanks mostly to two of the 鈥淣ine Old Men鈥 鈥 Ward Kimball (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1971鈥檚 Bedknobs and Broomsticks) and Frank Thomas (1940鈥檚 Pinocchio, 1977鈥檚 The Rescuers) 鈥 and Norm Ferguson (鈥淒ance of the Hours鈥 in 1940鈥檚 Fantasia, 1953鈥檚 Peter Pan). Because of the sheer number of characters that Thomas and Kimball designed and directed on this film (and this is not even mentioning several other fellow directing animators), I will focus on two specific characters of theirs.
For Norm Ferguson, he is the sole directing animator of the Walrus and the Carpenter, the characters from the eponymous segment imparted to Alice by Tweedledee and Tweedledum (itself an adaptation of Carroll鈥檚 鈥淭he Walrus and the Carpenter鈥 poem within Through the Looking-Glass). As a study of differences, the designs of both characters give their personalities away even if one were to mute the audio or view a still image. The Carpenter 鈥 scrawny, scruffy, and short 鈥 telegraphs his dimwittedness and gullibility from his opening moments on-screen. Adding to that visual characterization is that he shares a voice actor, J. Pat O'Malley, and a squeaky, honky timbre with Tweedledee and Tweedledum. O鈥橫alley also voices the Walrus, but adjusts his delivery to a throaty bass, interspersed with the coughing one expects from a chain-smoker, let alone a chain-smoking walrus. The Walrus 鈥 appropriately rotund (as walruses should be) with a kitschy suit 鈥 is a charming fellow, but beneath that charm are his occasional all-knowing smirks that belie selfish intentions. Ferguson鈥檚 clashing character animation for both, in addition to the morbid comedy of 鈥淭he Walrus and the Carpenter鈥, are a brilliant complement the abridged poem used in the scene. Alice in Wonderland would be Norman Ferguson鈥檚 penultimate film with the studio before his retirement due to complications with diabetes.
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With Alice in Wonderland, Frank Thomas is the directing animator for the movie鈥檚 antagonist for the second straight Disney animated feature. The techniques and artistry used for Cinderella鈥檚 Lady Tremaine and the Queen of Hearts 鈥 voiced deliciously (and boisterously) by Disney regular Verna Felton (Dumbo鈥檚 Mrs. Jumbo and the Elephant Matriarch, Cinderella鈥檚 Fairy Godmother) 鈥 could not be any more different. Where Lady Tremaine was heavily rotoscoped in her movements and facial expressions, there is nothing realistic about the Queen of Hearts鈥 physicality. As a buxom bundle of waving limbs, she has arguably the most fleshy and expressive face in a 1950s Disney animated feature. In that face, in Felton鈥檚 iconic voice acting, we find a crazed monarch who desperately needs to see a therapist to contain her volcanic temper. Thomas鈥 character design sells the Queen of Hearts鈥 mood swings 鈥 perfunctory courteousness, egomania, pettiness, and bloodlust (鈥淥ff with his head!鈥). Thus, she becomes Disney鈥檚 closest analogue to the uptight and pretentious narcissists that the likes of Bugs Bunny or, to a lesser extent, Daffy Duck might have brought down to size in a Looney Tunes聽short film. How fortunate that the Queen of Hearts only appears in Alice in Wonderland鈥檚 concluding stages; an entire film dedicated to her (please do not pass this hypothetical along to a Walt Disney Company executive) would be a wearisome indulgence.
The last masterstroke of character design is thanks to Ward Kimball. Kimball, shortly about to revert his focus from feature animation to television and the Disney theme parks, was the principal designer of the Cheshire Cat. The wide-grinning Cheshire Cat, voiced by Sterling Holloway (Kaa in 1967鈥檚 The Jungle Book, the original voice of Winnie the Pooh), is a distinctive swirl of purple and pink stripes, his yellow eyes giving off a blazing glare. As opposed to the Queen of Hearts, the Cheshire Cat 鈥 no more or less peculiar than any other inhabitant of Wonderland 鈥 rarely stands on his hind legs. Instead, he prefers to perch himself, stomach-first, and limit his non-facial physical movements. With Holloway鈥檚 mellifluous voice acting, the physics-bending Cheshire Cat is not the sort to be vengeful or unleash verbal fire and brimstone. But with his capabilities of troublemaking for his own personal entertainment, he is the least predictable and perhaps most dangerous character of all. Depending on the viewer, the Cheshire Cat can be seen as a darkly comic figure and/or the film鈥檚 greatest source of malevolence, however restrained.
After watching Alice in Wonderland more than most Disney animated films over the course of my lifetime, I still struggle over how to categorize Kimball鈥檚 magical cat. Certainly, Cheshire Cat is an antagonist, but do his actions place him in the pantheon of Disney villains? Reading Carroll鈥檚 books and noting 鈥 however circuitously 鈥 Cheshire Cat helps Alice become 鈥渦nlost鈥, perhaps being considered a trickster will suffice.
The soundtrack to Alice in Wonderland contains the greatest number of songs (sixteen from a potential thirty) in the entire Disney animated feature canon. That is partly due to the length of these compositions 鈥 clocking in, in several instances, at just under or over one minute 鈥 and that more than a handful of these songs are adaptations (partial or complete) of a Lewis Carroll poem. Disney hired a battalion of Tin Pan Alley composers and lyricists to pen/adapt songs around Carroll鈥檚 poems, but just over half of the songs were composed by Sammy Fain (鈥淪ecret Love鈥 in 1953鈥檚 Calamity Jane, 鈥淟ove is a Many-Splendored Thing鈥 from the 1955 film of the same name) set to Bob Hilliard鈥檚 (鈥淐ivilization鈥, also known as 鈥淏ongo, Bongo, Bongo (I Don鈥檛 Want to Leave the Congo)鈥) lyrics. Among their mostly original compositions, Fain and Hilliard are responsible for the title song, 鈥淚n a World of My Own鈥, and 鈥淧ainting the Roses Red鈥, among several other earworms utilizing Carroll鈥檚 poetry.
Debatably Alice in Wonderland鈥檚 ultimate earworm is the original song 鈥淎 Very Merry Un-birthday鈥 by Mack David, Al Hoffman, and Jerry Livingston (the trio also composed 鈥淏ibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo in 1950鈥檚 Cinderella). Because of this song鈥檚 affiliation with a certain ride at the Disney theme parks, you, the reader, might already be very familiar with the song鈥檚 melody without ever watching Alice in Wonderland. Sung raucously by the Mad Hatter and March Hare (incredible voice acting by Ed Wynn and Jerry Colonna, respectively) alongside Alice, the 鈥渦nbirthday song鈥 is even more jaunty, celebratory, and devilishly catchy than 鈥淗appy Birthday鈥 itself. With this lengthy soundtrack, Alice in Wonderland鈥檚 songs completely overshadow and are referenced across Oliver Wallace鈥檚 (the notorious title song and score to 1942鈥檚 Der Fuehrer鈥檚 Face, 1963鈥檚 The Incredible Journey) score. For such a riotous and absurd movie, the film contains an equally riotous and absurd soundtrack to empower all of its nonsense.
The qualities that have made Alice in Wonderland treasured by many (including yours truly) today are the exact same ones that British literary and film critics took issue with in 1951. This Alice eviscerates Lewis Carroll鈥檚 literary vision and it is too 鈥淎merican鈥, these critics wrote. Walt Disney, years removed from his namesake studio鈥檚 Golden Age animated features (an era where he might have considered the words of academic and critics), now could not care less.
Walt鈥檚 distaste for academic and critics in the second half of his career began after musical and film critics pilloried Fantasia (1940). But his disdain for such individuals was fully realized after their response to the innovative and controversial Song of the South (1946) 鈥 which Walt intended as a hurrah for the American folklore that colored his childhood. Even upon Song of the South鈥檚 release, protesters and picketers decried the film for sentimentalizing the lives of black people in the immediate postbellum American South. 鈥淭he master-and-slave relation is so lovingly regarded in your yarn,鈥 New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote, 鈥溾 that one might almost imagine that you figure Abe Lincoln made a mistake. Put down that mint julep, Mr. Disney.鈥 Disney took this wave of criticism over Song of the South personally, and convinced himself that supposedly communist enemies from rival studios and hostile sociopolitical circles were inflaming these attacks against his films and his studio. How dare these people, Walt must have thought, tell the inventor of Mickey Mouse and the man who gave Hugh Harman, Rudolf Ising, and Friz Freleng their first jobs in animated cinema what he could or could not do artistically. Walt Disney could justly say he laid the foundation for American animated cinema in Kansas City 鈥 before Burbank, before the overcrowded studio in Hyperion 鈥 all those years ago, which must have fueled his pride and dismissal of his naysayers.
In an earlier decade, Walt 鈥 especially when noting that Carroll鈥檚 work was integral to his start in animated film in the 1920s 鈥 might have publicly lashed out to the polarized response that met Alice in Wonderland. Now, Walt had compartmentalized his feelings. And as Alice in Wonderland made its way through theaters, a long-gestating animated feature featuring a canine romance was finally moving forward. Another film, made possible due to the windfalls from Cinderella, had just been greenlit, and would not see completion until decade鈥檚 end.
Although not successful in its theatrical run, Alice in Wonderland became the first Disney film to rejuvenate its reputation in the popular mindset through television. TV became widespread in the United States and Britain after the Second World War and, with it, Walt Disney would use the medium to broadcast his older films, to alter popular perceptions of his own persona and personal history, and to employ idealized images and storytelling in telling the story of his namesake studio. Removed from the cultural discourse dominating airwaves and headlines in the early 1950s, viewers in the decades following Alice in Wonderland鈥檚 release can now appreciate the film鈥檚 role in the Disney animated canon. Alice in Wonderland is a demented classic that, because of its narrative-unfriendly content, has influenced few films following it. The film adjusts Lewis Carroll鈥檚 books in ways that pay homage to his writing, but also to chart a colorful course for viewers and Disney fans as cinematically as possible.
My rating: 9/10
^ Based on my personal imdb rating. Half-points are always rounded down. My interpretation of that ratings system can be found in the 鈥淩atings system鈥 page on my blog (as of July 1, 2020, tumblr is not permitting certain posts with links to appear on tag pages, so I cannot provide the URL).
For more of my reviews tagged 鈥淢y Movie Odyssey鈥, check out the tag of the same name on my blog.
This is the twenty-first Movie Odyssey Retrospective. Movie Odyssey Retrospectives are reviews on films I had seen in their entirety before this blog鈥檚 creation or films I failed to give a full-length write-up to following the blog鈥檚 creation. Previous Retrospectives include The Kid聽(1921),聽Cinderella聽(1950), and The Sound of Music聽(1965).
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greasyratboya month ago
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when my chemical romance said "they're teaching me to kill, who's teaching me to love?" and when pat the bunny said "I don't know how to live but I'm sick of learning how to die"
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cannasuea month ago
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Military Dramas; Theatres and Thespians.
Military Dramas; Theatres and聽Thespians.
During the writing of book I and II I frequently refer to those thespian Tommies that walked the boards in Weymouth and Portland. One person in particular attracted my attention, Captain Pat A鈥橞eckett He was based at the Nothe during and after WWI. A man of many talents, particularly when it came to performance. Captain A鈥橞eckett, or to give him his full name, Patrick Albert Forbes Winslow鈥
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lewis-wintersa month ago
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Some additional d忙mon!au headcanons, a continuation of this headcanon list.
Ok so I thought about it some more and decided to change Dick's d忙mon from a Caracara to a Gyrfalcon. Still a raptor, but a larger one that has, historically, been used in falconry and hunting and is, in some European countries, a symbol of patriotism and national pride. Dick's daemon is a female, silver-streaked Gyrfalcon that settled sometime after college but before Fort Benning. Her name's Anahida, and she speaks like a queen. Like, literally, I imagine her voice sounds a lot like Helen McCrory's (gee, I wonder why). She's very large and eye catching, but she only speaks when spoken to-- which is rare. In a society as repressed as 1930s - 1940s America, I imagine speaking to another person's d忙mon would be seen as rude or taboo. Because of that, Anahida barely speaks and thus, people often forget she's there. There are rumors too, that Dick's the son of a witch, because Anahida likes to fly far above and at a distance, farther than any human-d忙mon bond should go. However, it isn't true. They just practiced a lot growing up. Dick's always wanted to fly, in some way or another, and practicing as well as testing how far they can both stretch from each other was their afternoon play time. It's weird. I know. But this is Dick we're talking about. Of course he'd do something like this.
Anahida is the only one allowed to berate Dick when he's being exceptionally petty or self-righteous. She keeps him in check. It never happens often, but it happens enough. Other than that, they're right as rain and very in-sync with each other.
Is anybody surprised that the only other person who will ever address Anahida directly is Lewis? Show of hands? None? Yeah, me too.
Liebgott's d忙mon's name is Chaya and, after some pondering, I've come to the conclusion that she's a Bat-eared fox. Very chatty, too. She and Lieb are very blunt, but she's arguably the blunter one of the two. Where Lieb sometimes gives into the urge to hide or repress feelings, Chaya is willing to take more risk. She does this thing where she will boldly go one way, the way she knows is good for them both, stretching their bond even to its thinnest and most painful, just to get Lieb to finally concede and agree with her. They're both stubborn as all hell, that's the problem. Sometimes Lieb will deny himself things for a myriad of reasons. Chaya has no such qualms. She loves him, but she definitely thinks he's an idiot sometimes. It also sometimes extends to how Lieb gets really soft around people he cares about. In the wild, male Bat-eared foxes are the more nurturing of the young, while the females are the ones who go out and hunt. Kind of the same with Lieb and Chaya. Lieb takes care, he hovers and forgets that boundaries exist-- his own, and the person he's taking care of. But Chaya's the kind who remembers, and reminds Lieb that sometimes you can't give all of yourself away, no matter how much you want to. Does that make sense?
(Disclaimer: I gotta admit. The reason why I hesitated with Lieb was because I didn't want to accidentally be anti-Semitic. I grew up in a country that is primarily Christian and Muslim so I am only familiar with Islamophobic visual vocab, not so the anti-Semitic ones. I had to make sure the animals I assigned a Jewish man's literal soul to were not anti-Semitic or used in anti-Semitic imagery by Nazi propaganda in any way. So. Yeah. Um. Pigs, goats, lizards/reptiles, rats, rodent-adjacent, or any animal seen as "pests" or "vermin" were immediately struck out. Nope. Let's not.)
You wouldn't know it at first glance, but Web and his raven d忙mon have a very intense love-hate relationship. Annabelle is a very act-first, introspection-never kind of thing. Web is the opposite. Sometimes, Annabelle will act before Web himself will, and she can be very, very vicious. Because of this, Web is afraid of her and Annabelle resents him. They never fight in public, they largely ignore each other, but often when they get into it... well. It gets almost... a bit too violent. Some of the others have never seen a human and a daemon hurt each other until they鈥檝e met these two. Sometimes, Annabelle often thinks that she鈥檚 somebody else entirely, a completely different entity from Web, and sometimes, Web thinks she鈥檚 a changeling. That maybe some fae or other switched his real daemon out for this cursed one. It鈥檚 a really fractured, complicated relationship.
When they鈥檙e on the same wave length, though, they鈥檙e scary. The only thing they can seem to agree on is passionate and impulsive anger. Web will always regret it afterwards whereas Annabelle is always smug about it. They calm down after the war and they鈥檙e back home. During the war, though, they鈥檙e both a mess.
Joe Toye鈥檚 daemon is a doberman pinscher named Alessia who is just about as quiet and solemn as her human. Classic soldier daemon. He calls her Al for short. When he loses a leg, she doesn鈥檛. I don鈥檛 think amputation in the daemon world works that way, at least not according to Pullman鈥檚 original text. Going back home with her after his amputation is easier because she鈥檚 there to encouraged him and hold him up when necessary. They make a good team. They share similar fears and insecurities so it鈥檚 easy for the both of them to understand each other and help each other through it.
Pat has a little american robin as a daemon. Which is really funny, honestly. Big tough guy like Pat, you鈥檇 think he鈥檇 have a big tough daemon for sure, but that鈥檚 not the case with him. He鈥檚 always been gentle and unassuming, Pat and so is his daemon. Her name鈥檚聽 Aoibheann (pronounced聽ay-veen). She likes to sit on his shoulder and rarely flies far away from him. When they jumped, she stayed inside his jacket at all times, tucked away and close. The only time she flies is later on at peace time, when she knows they鈥檙e both safe and she can leave Pat for a few minutes without it being too much trouble.
Johnny鈥檚 daemon is a mongoose named Corentine, but he calls her Cora. She鈥檚 fiesty. Sobel鈥檚 rooster daemon, Julius, wasn鈥檛 very fond of her. In fact, he was downright frightened of her. It鈥檚 why Sobel won鈥檛 mess with Johnny. It鈥檚 really funny.
Perco鈥檚 daemon is in the same family. A weasel. A tiny little thing he can hold in both his hands. Her name鈥檚 Jackie. I have no idea why. But it fits.
Ralph Spina鈥檚 daemon is a raccoon. It鈥檚 adorable. His name鈥檚 Nimaphael. But he hates it and everybody just calls him Nim. Ralph carries him around like a baby on a sling, strapped to his chest. Unlike Harry and Saoirse, you can tease them about this. They鈥檙e aware it looks ridiculous. They also don鈥檛 care.
Bull鈥檚 daemon is a sun bear. I know. I didn鈥檛 see this coming, either. But I thought about it and... honestly? It fits. Not to mention Bull鈥檚 pretty big. He can carry her no problem. Her name鈥檚 Xanthia, by the way. And she鈥檚 very sweet, if only a little gruff in showing affection. She鈥檚 also not afraid to do what needs to be done. If she needs to have a go at an enemy鈥檚 daemon, then you know she鈥檒l do it. She definitely isn鈥檛 afraid to get down and dirty. It scares the replacements for awhile, until they realize that she only does it to protect her own.聽
I finally figured out what Merriell Shelton鈥檚 daemon is-- it鈥檚 a Jaguarundi. It鈥檚 a wild cat that looks to be a mix between a house cat and a mongoose. They鈥檙e fascinating and they hiss. A lot. It鈥檚 a perfect fit. Again, he name is Charlotte, but he calls her Lotte. Imagining them swaggering down the streets of 1940s New Orleans appeals to my aesthetic sense so much I cry just thinking about it.
BONUS:
Kitty Grogan鈥檚 daemon is, not surprisingly, a cat. But not a domesticated one. He looks like it at first glance, but he鈥檚 not. He鈥檚 an African Wild Cat and he鈥檚 a sarcastic little shit named Xaphania. Xaph for short. Send me a wink if you understand that reference.
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shottya month ago
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Every time I pick up the guitar I think to myself, 鈥... I wanna be the very best, like no one ever was鈥 馃幐馃槅
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thecomicona month ago
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Preview: Riverdale's Crown Prince Of Burgers Put To Task In 'World Of Archie Jumbo Comics Digest' #107
Preview: Riverdale鈥檚 Crown Prince Of Burgers Put To Task In 鈥榃orld Of Archie Jumbo Comics Digest鈥櫬#107
World of Archie Jumbo Comics Digest #107 drops this week from Archie Comics. Featuring the talents of Jeff Schultz, Bob Smith, Glenn Whitmore, Jack Morelli, Pat and Tim Kennedy, Jim Amash, Rosario 鈥淭ito鈥 Pe帽a, Jack Morelli, and more, the book features nearly 200 full color pages and an all new classic-style story, 鈥楤urger Bonanza.鈥 鈥楶op鈥檚 Chocklit Shoppe is holding a competitive burger-eating鈥
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thecomicona month ago
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Preview: 100 More Of The Gang's Best And Brightest Collected In 'Archie Comics 1000 Page Delight'
Preview: 100 More Of The Gang鈥檚 Best And Brightest Collected In 鈥楢rchie Comics 1000 Page聽Delight鈥
Archie Comics presents over 100 more of Archie鈥檚 best, brightest, and most hilarious stories with Archie 1,000 Page Comics Delight. Featuring the talents of Frank Doyle, Jon D鈥橝gostino, Bill Yoshida, Stan Goldberg, Pat and Tim Kennedy, Bob Smith, Rosario 鈥淭ito鈥 Pe帽a, and more, Archie 1,000 Page Comics Delight is available on digital platforms this Wednesday, March 3, 2021, and on comic book store鈥
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wanderwoodsandwatera month ago
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The teleprinter chattered again. 鈥淧K TO CIRCUIT. BIG EXPLOSION IN DIRECTION OF JX. WE CAN SEE MUSHROOM CLOUD.鈥 PK meant Palatka, a small town on the St. Johns south of Jacksonville. Florence rose ... 鈥淚鈥檓 very sorry, Mr. Quisenberry,鈥 she said, 鈥渂ut I can鈥檛 send this. Jacksonville doesn鈥檛 seem to be there any more鈥 鈥 from Pat Frank鈥檚 鈥淎las Babylon鈥 (1959)
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how-are-those-nuts-sargea month ago
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Band of Brothers GIF phone wallpapers (with flowers).
Order:
Lewis Nixon
Eugene Roe
Bill Guarnere
Frank Perconte
Floyd Talbert
Pat Christenson
Denver聽鈥淏ull鈥 Randleman
Harry Welsh
Darrell聽鈥淪hifty鈥 Powers
Carwood Lipton
Joe Toye
Joseph (Joe) Liebgott
Donald Hoobler
(Richard) Dick Winters
George Luz
Donald Malarkey
David Webster
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tcmparty2 months ago
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@tcmparty live tweet schedule for the week beginning Monday, February 15, 2021. Look for us on Twitter鈥atch and tweet along鈥emember to add #TCMParty to your tweets so everyone can find them :) All times are Eastern.
Friday, Feb. 19 at 8:00 p.m. GUN CRAZY (1950) Two disturbed young people release their fascination with guns through a crime spree. 聽聽
Sunday, Feb. 21 at 8:00 p.m. BOMBSHELL (1933) A glamorous film star rebels against the studio, her pushy press agent and a family of hangers-on. 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽 聽
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quotemadness2 months ago
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I love you. I worry about you. I wonder whether I tell you enough how I love you and want you and need you and how I am diminished.. when you are not with me and how I am multiplied when you are here.
Pat Frank聽
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