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#Paul poiret
fripperiesandfobs · 4 months ago
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Poiret day dress, 1924-26
From Kerry Taylor Auctions
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sartorialadventure · 6 months ago
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Evening dress by Paul Poiret, 1930s
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galadhremmin · 3 months ago
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Doegred Winsterhand. [watercolour 11/07/2021] Maedhros' Old English name is Doegred Winsterhand (Ang. Doegred=dawn, daybreak, Winsterhand=left-handed). So here he is, watching the red sun rise from one of the walls of Himring.  He’s wearing a robe based on Poiret’s La Perse coat (1911), though being a freehand drawing I’m sure this is not an entirely accurate representation of the pattern; I also tried to make it look not just black and white like the original, but like shot silk with a dark blue glow.  @tolkiengenweek
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history-of-fashion · 6 months ago
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1937-1939 Dress by Paul Poiret
chintz, velvet
(Palais Galliera, musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris)
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costumeloverz71 · 5 months ago
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This photograph of British actress Joan Fontaine in James’s delicate dress with ribbon bodice (the designer was at this time creating fabrics for the French textile house Colcombet), was published in 1937, the year that the then London-based James gave his first Paris presentation. Seeing the clothes, so the story goes, Paul Poiret, once “the king of fashion,” said to James: “I pass you my crown, wear it well.”
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wtxch · 4 months ago
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Paul Poiret's bedroom , Paris, c. 1924 
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omgthatdress · 4 months ago
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Flèche d'Or
Paul Poiret, 1925
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
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montmartre-parapluie · 3 months ago
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So, someone has been Lurking a round the Shadow and Bone fandom - mostly inspired by the fabulously talented @orlissa’s and @jomiddlemarch ‘s glorious fics, which give a GREAT nod to a more historically grounded Grishaverse. And... I do keep going to Pinterest and staring at pretty gowns, (coincidentally in shades of gold and black)... so...
Oh, what the hell. I make no apologies, people. This mad historical fashion dump is my ‘give Alina ALL the imposing gowns and elegant outfits’ -and possibly a shadowmancer husband post...
A Radiant Ballgown - Literally!
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First off, I COULDN’T pass up this gown! It was designed by Charles Frederick Worth for an 1883 fancy dress ball in New York for one of the Vanderbilts, who appeared as the personification of “Electric Light”.
This was a very cutting edge costume for the time. The dress even came equipped with a battery to power an electric torch carried in one hand.
(But who needs batteries when you’re a Grisha Sun Summoner?)
It’s a glorious combination of butter yellow and white silk, with hints of lustrous black velvet at the hem. The spangled gold embroidery all over the gown would glitter under strong light - which is just PERFECT for a Sun Summoner to wear whilst demonstrating her powers. It’s also no bad outfit to wear if you have Unresolved Sexual Tension with your shadowy nemesis whilst dancing in the midst of a decadent Lentsov masquerade ball. This gown sort of begs for that kind of high-melodrama!
Keftas Galore...
Now, I don’t know whether I’m subconscious channelling some ‘last days of the Romanovs/Anastasia’ vibes when I think about keftas for Alina...
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(Not ... quite what I’m going for)
but... I ended up looking at Paul Poiret Edwardian evening coats for inspiration, and oh my goodness, the sheer luxurious drama of them all!
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Grisha keftas... because they’re worth it. (The one on the right feels very ‘Decadent Tango with the Darkling’ to me)
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I mean, if you’re going to have to rule as a benevolent dictator with your shadowmancer husband after overthrowing a corrupt regime in order to protect Grishakind and Ravka, you might as well look amazing while doing it, right? In colours which show how you “balance” each other out...
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The gorgeous yellow velvet robe on the right looks like maybe the costume designer from Shadow and Bone used it as inspiration for Alina’s gold kefta? either way, the black appliqué is GORGEOUS. And I would wear it in a heartbeat.
Plus, if you couple them with the breathtaking Mario Fortuny gowns of the late teens/early 20s, it gives a gorgeous look that very much plays into the ‘Sankta Alina’ image...
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They come in gold and black, for choosing your look: ‘Sun Summoner’ or ‘Dark Bride of the Starless Saint’.
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I have to admit, my shipping brain chose these last couple of fluttery dressing gowns for the fact they would be very tactical for persuading Aleksander to stop working on his battle strategies and come to bed.
I’m sorry. i’m trash.
A massive, massive thank you to all the wonderful fic writers out there!
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pale-hands-i-love · 8 months ago
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Rudolph Valentino & Natacha Rambova photographed outside the Plaza Athénée Hotel in Paris during their 1923 European honeymoon tour - Natacha is wearing a most fashionable automobile outfit by renowned Parisian couturier Paul Poiret.
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fashionbooksmilano · 5 months ago
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Fashion and the Art of Pochoir
The Golden Age of Illustration in Paris
April Calahan and Cassidy Zachary
Thames & Hudson, London 2015, 240 pages, 25.65 x 3.05 x 33.27 cm, ISBN  978-0500239391
euro 54,00
email if you want to buy :booksinprogressmilano@yahoo.it
The 1910s and 1920s witnessed an outpouring of luxury publications that used a hand-stencilling technique known as pochoir (French for ‘stencil’). The highly refined and painterly technique, which consists of applying layers of gouache paint or watercolour to achieve bold blocks of saturated colour, produced works of visual artistry formerly unrivalled in the history of illustration, and it became the medium of choice for avant-garde couturiers seeking to stand apart and cultivate an elite readership. Organized chronologically by publication and showcasing a carefully curated selection of the most exceptional illustrations from couture albums and high-end magazines, Fashion and the Art of Pochoir is the definitive tribute to the artists and couturiers who first united to redefine luxury, inaugurating the enduring alliance between fashion and art, from Schiaparelli and Dalì to Vuitton and Murakami today. Including biographical notices of illustrators and fashion designers, the book offers a unique chance for illustrators, artists, designers and fashion enthusiasts to discover the rarely seen images that defined a brief but magnificent golden age.
14/05/21
orders to:     booksinprogressmilano@yahoo.it
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twitter:         @fashionbooksmi
instagram:   fashionbooksmilano, designbooksmilano tumblr:          fashionbooksmilano, designbooksmilano
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fawnvelveteen · 5 months ago
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A Dufy/Poiret Printed Silk Pongee Couture Dress For Atelier Martine Circa 1915
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danismm · 10 months ago
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Evening dress by Paul Poiret, 1914.
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shewhoworshipscarlin · 4 months ago
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Pinafore dress by Paul Poiret, 1908-11.
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designobjectory · 8 months ago
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Black Lacquered and Silver Leaf  Art Deco Vanity Table Designed by Paul Poiret, manufactured by Contempora, New York
The circular dressing glass flanked on the left by a curved panel continuing to an attached two stepped drawer and terminating in a circular seat, the right side continuing to a four drawer chest.
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history-of-fashion · 9 months ago
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1920-1925 Woman's dress by Paul Poiret (France)
silk damask with metallic-thread supplementary weft patterning and metallic-thread and silk satin (lamé)
(Los Angeles County Museum of Art)
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fripperiesandfobs · 10 months ago
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Poiret evening dress ca. 1921-22
From Enchères Sadde via Interencheres
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door · 11 months ago
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Paul Poiret, “Laquered and Gold- and Silver-Leaf Bed & Vanity,” c. 1929
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nobrashfestivity · a year ago
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Paul Poiret, Fabric Design with Blue Flowers, 1918
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fashionsfromhistory · a year ago
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Dress
Paul Poiret
1920s
A leader in adopting new trends, Poiret, who opened his store in 1903, had keen insight into the fashion sensibilities of the early twentieth century. He presented a dress without a corset in 1906 and later introduced a series of works influenced by the avant-garde Ballets Russes that incorporated motifs from Egypt and Eastern Europe, among other sources. As he sought to break away from nineteenth-century-style clothing that conformed to and restricted the body, he worked to create a straight cut and gentle drape in his dresses, drawing on clothing features from several countries, including Japan. 
Poiret’s wife, Denise, is said to have worn this dress, tailored to suggest a black woven “haori”, or short coat, worn over a gray kimono. The haori-style collar would have allowed the wearer to wrap a stole around her neck. Judging from the ground pattern of linked weights, the stenciled shibori pattern of linked semicircles, the area-dyeing (okezome) in gray and black, and the red seals stamped on the lining, the fabric might be of Japanese origin—a likelihood given that Poiret collected fabrics from around the world.
Kyoto Costume Institute
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hauntedbystorytelling · 9 months ago
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Wilhelm Willlinger :: Fashion pictures Pantomime dancers in Persian style dresses designed by Paul Poiret, 1914. Published in Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung 3/1914. | src and hi-res Getty Images
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