Visit Blog

Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.

Fun Fact

The company's tagline is "Follow the World's Creators".

Trending Blogs
#academia

It occurred to me as people started sending book recs that the reading list from my graduate history seminar on politics, institutions and culture in America might be useful to share, too, so:

  • Alan Trachtenberg, The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age (1982)
  •  Keith Revell, Building Gotham: Civic Culture and Public Policy in Manhattan, 1898-1938 (2002)
  •  Seema Sohi, Echoes of Mutiny: Race, Surveillance, and Indian Anticolonialism in North America (2014)
  •  Mai Ngai, Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2005)
  •  Eric Rauchway, The Great Depression and the New Deal: A Very Short Introduction (2008)
  •  Margot Canaday, The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America (2009)
  •  James Sparrow, Warfare State: World War II Americans in the Age of Big Government (2013)
  •  David M. P. Freund, Colored Property: State Policy and White Racial Politics in Suburban America (2007)
  •  Nathan Connolly, A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida (2014)
  •  Penny M. Von Eschen, Satchmo Blows up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War (2006)
  •  Kim Phillips-Fein, Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics (2018)
  •  Elizabeth Hinton, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America (2016)
  •  Nancy Kwak, A World of Homeowners: American Power and the Politics of Housing Aid (2015)

You can find a lot of these used on line or available as ebooks from university libraries if your local library doesn’t have copies. Some of these are dense academic reads, but this was one of the most enlightening and important courses I’ve ever taken, and these are a great start for anybody wanting to better understand systemic inequality in America.

28 notes · See All

You don’t need Mildliners. Sharpie highlighters work the exact same way.


You don’t need Moleskine or Leuchtturn notebooks. That old spiral you found in the back of your closet is free, so why not make use of it?


You don’t need to drink so much coffee your head hurts, or have it black. In matters of taste, there can be no disputes.


You don’t need to own hundreds of books. If that was financially feasible for the majority of people, libraries wouldn’t exist.


There is no shame in not having (or not wanting!) thousands of dollars to dedicate to the aesthetic. It does not make you any less of a scholar.

13 notes · See All

Reading List

** = only need to review or skim/read selections of chapters/sections

# = I only have the ebook, not a physical copy

Summer 2020:

  1. **Phonology (Spencer) [review/skim, esp. suprasegmental phen.]
  2. **Vowels and Consonants (Disner/Ladefoged) [review/skim]
  3. Sapiens (Harari)
  4. Landmarks in Linguistic Thought: Volume I (Harris/Taylor)
  5. The Dawn of Slavic (Schoenberg)
  6. Phonological Theory: The Essential Readings (Goldsmith)
  7. #A Theory of Phonological Features (Duanmu)
  8. Autosegmental and Metrical Phonology (Goldsmith)
  9. #Prosodic Features and Prosodic Structure: The Phonology of Suprasegmentals (Fox)
  10. Optimality Theory (Kager)
  11. #Experimental Approaches to Phonology (Solé/Beddor/Ohala)
  12. **The Grammar of Words: An Introduction to Morphology (Booij) [review/skim]
  13. **Syntactic Theory (Poole)
  14. #Constituent Structure (Carnie)
  15. #The Morphosyntax of Gender (Kramer)
  16. #Parameters of Slavic Morphosyntax (Franks)
  17. #Linguistic Minimalism: Origins, Concepts, Methods, and Aims (Boeckx)
  18. Historical Linguistics: An Introduction (Campbell)
  19. #The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European World (Mallory/Adams)
  20. Comparative Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction (Beekes)
  21. #From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic (Ringe)
  22. #The Development of Old English (Ringe/Taylor)
  23. Western Linguistics: An Historical Introduction (Seuren)
  24. #Introducing Psycholinguistics (Warren)
  25. Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek (Morwood)
  26. #New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin (Sihler)
  27. A Sanskrit Grammar for Beginners (Müller)

Before I condensed the list to the above, my list was a bit more….. shall we say, optimistic about my time management skills this summer lmao. The original list is below.

Previous List:

  1. **Phonology (Spencer) [review/skim, esp. suprasegmental phen.]
  2. **Vowels and Consonants (Disner/Ladefoged) [review/skim]
  3. Sapiens (Harari)
  4. Landmarks in Linguistic Thought: Volume I (Harris/Taylor)
  5. The Dawn of Slavic (Schoenberg)
  6. Phonological Theory: The Essential Readings (Goldsmith)
  7. A Theory of Phonological Features (Duanmu)
  8. The Development of Distinctive Features (Mielke)
  9. Autosegmental and Metrical Phonology (Goldsmith)
  10. Prosodic Features and Prosodic Structure: The Phonology of Suprasegmentals (Fox)
  11. Optimality Theory (Kager)
  12. Experimental Approaches to Phonology (Solé/Beddor/Ohala)
  13. **The Cambridge Handbook of Phonology (just selected sections)
  14. **The Oxford Handbook of Historical Phonology (just selected sections)
  15. **The Grammar of Words: An Introduction to Morphology (Booij) [review/skim]
  16. **Syntax: A Generative Introduction (Carnie) [Review/skim, especially later chapters]
  17. **Syntactic Theory (Poole)
  18. Constituent Structure (Carnie)
  19. Syntactic Categories: Their Identification and Description in Linguistic Theories (Rauh)
  20. Adjectives and Adverbs: Syntax, Semantics, and Discourse (McNally/Kennedy)
  21. The Syntax of Russian (Bailyn)
  22. **Introduction to Government and Binding Theory (Haegeman)
  23. **Principles and Parameters: An Introduction to Syntactic Theory (Culicover)
  24. The Morphosyntax of Gender (Kramer)
  25. Serial Verb Constructions (Aikhenvald/Dixon)
  26. Parameters of Slavic Morphosyntax (Franks)
  27. Null Subjects in Generative Grammar (Cognola/Casalicchio)
  28. Linguistic Minimalism: Origins, Concepts, Methods, and Aims (Boeckx)
  29. Bare Syntax (Boeckx)
  30. Exploring Nanosyntax (Baunaz/De Clercq/Haegeman/Lander)
  31. Historical Linguistics: An Introduction (Campbell)
  32. **An Introduction to Historical Linguistics (Crowley/Bowern) [skim]
  33. **Historical Linguistics: Towards a 21st-Century Reintegration (Ringe/Eska)
  34. The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European World (Mallory/Adams)
  35. **Indo-European Language and Culture: An Introduction (Fortson)
  36. Comparative Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction (Beekes)
  37. **Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction (Clackson)
  38. A History of the English Language (Baugh/Cable)
  39. From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic (Ringe)
  40. The Development of Old English (Ringe/Taylor)
  41. A Guide to Old English (Mitchell/Robinson)
  42. From Old English to Standard English (Freeborn)
  43. **The Cambridge History of the English Language: Volume I (Blake)
  44. **The Cambridge History of the English Language: Volume II (Hogg)
  45. Sound Change and the History of English (Smith)
  46. Diachronic Syntax (Roberts)
  47. Micro-Change and Macro-Change in Diachronic Syntax (Mathieu/Truswell)
  48. Tense: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics (Comrie)
  49. Aspect: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics (Comrie)
  50. Mood and Modality: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics (Palmer)
  51. **Modality (Portner)
  52. Number: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics (Corbett)
  53. Case: Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics (Blake)
  54. **The Oxford Handbook of Case (Malchukov/Spencer)
  55. Western Linguistics: An Historical Introduction (Seuren)
  56. Case and Aspect in Slavic (Richardson)
  57. **Semantics (Saeed) [skim/review]
  58. Formal Semantics: An Introduction (Cann)
  59. Language Origins: Perspectives on Evolution (Tallerman)
  60. Introducing Psycholinguistics (Warren)
  61. A Grammar of the Latin Language (Zumpt)
  62. The Oxford Latin Syntax: Volume I (Finester)
  63. New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin (Sihler)
  64. Oxford Grammar of Classical Greek (Morwood)
  65. A Sanskrit Grammar for Beginners (Müller)
  66. Sanskrit Manual (Bucknell)
  67. A Sanskrit Grammar for Students (MacDonell)
  68. Syllable and Segment in Latin (Sen)
  69. The Development of Latin Clause Structure (Danckaert)
  70. The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages: Valume I (Maiden/Smith/Ledgeway)
  71. Romance Phonetics and Phonology (Gibson/Gil)
  72. The Romance Verb (Maiden)
  73. Computational Approaches to Morphology and Syntax (Roark/Sproat)
  74. Data Visualization and Exploration with R (Pimpler)
  75. Python for Linguists (Hammond)
9 notes · See All

I keep seeing this post about how funny it is when academics “hotly debate” on niche topics but honestly my favorite thing academics do is this thing of publishing a book in honor of a renowed collegue that either retired or passed away. 

Because the aim is to show the evolution/legacy of research in the field and give an update on whatever topic chosen, those books are just gold mines of information. 

6 notes · See All
Next Page