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#african american art
jareckiworld · 2 days ago
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Ernie Barnes (1938-2009) — Ballroom Soul  (oil on canvas, 1978)
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angelsinart · 6 months ago
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Seraphim I & II by S. C. Versillee Follow her Instagram - Twitter
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nobrashfestivity · 3 months ago
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Bill Traylor, 1940s
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handweavers · 3 months ago
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"Quilts made by generations of women in Gee’s Bend, Alabama, have hung in the Met, the Whitney, and the Smithsonian Museum of Art. They’ve been shown at galleries and art fairs around the world. But if the quilters want to directly sell their world-famous quilts — vibrant, often asymmetrical, charismatic works, originally hand-stitched for warmth from scavenged fabric — they’ve had to wait for prospective buyers to come to them.
That requires a drive deep into the Alabama Black Belt, along red dirt roads with little to no cell signal, through an isolated stretch of grassy meadows and pine woods, to a community deep in an oxbow of the Alabama River that, if the ferry’s not running, is nearly 40 miles from the closest hotel, supermarket, or pharmacy.
At least, this is how it worked before February of 2021.
Despite their celebrity, much of the quilters’ fame is based on visitors sharing their work outside of their community — and historically, the financial benefits have gone to people outside of their community, too. Occasionally, some of that trickles back in the form of one-off gallery sales, or copyright royalties. But it hasn’t been enough to lift this Black community, renowned in the art world, out of what the United Nations has called some of the most extreme conditions of poverty in the developed world.
One thing the Gee’s Bend quilters have needed is an easier way to sell quilts directly — control what they offer, set the prices, and reap all the profits. So, a year ago this month, three generations of Gee’s Bend quilters launched their own Etsy shops, turning the online platform into the accessible, direct-to-consumer sales opportunity they had been missing.
None of them had ever used Etsy before, but some were certainly familiar with it — and not for the opportunity it offered them. For years, a chorus of independent crafters had been peddling #geesbendinspired quilts on Etsy. While they racked up sales leveraging the Gee’s Bend name, the women behind their key search term carried on quilting when they could acquire fabric.
These days, when fourth-generation quilter Claudia Pettway Charley spots a “Gee’s Bend-inspired” quilt on Etsy, she’ll reach out to the seller to ask them how exactly they are related to her or her community. She hopes to engage them in a thoughtful dialogue about appropriation. She rarely receives a response.
“We put a lot of work into it, and it’s about our life,” Charley says of quilting. She recently took on the job of community manager in Gee’s Bend, vetting partnership opportunities and acting as a liaison between outsiders and her community. “We were struggling. These were made from scraps. Some was old denim that had been worn by my grandfather, torn and faded. My grandmother used corn and feed sacks, washed them and sometimes bleached them to have different colors. It wasn’t ‘I’m just going to go and make this.’ We used these quilts for warmth. It was about our struggle, and our survival.”
Charley might feel differently, she offers, if these makers — who may have, say, studied textiles at art school — sent some of their profits back to the community that inspired them. But that doesn’t happen. “This work is ‘inspired’ in your mind, because you see the quilt pattern,” Charley says. “But you don’t know my story. And you’re going to try and duplicate it — and go to Joann Fabrics to do it?”"
(Article continues at the link)
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stereostevie · a year ago
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Ernie Barnes The Sugar Shack II, 1976 Acrylic on canvas 36 in x 48 in
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biologicallyangry · 6 months ago
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women in art: betsy graves reyneau (1888-1964)
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betsy grave reyneau was a black painter known equally for her artistic talent as she was for her passion for civil rights. in 1917 she became the first woman arrested and jailed for protesting president wilson’s anti-suffrage stance. horrified by racial tensions in america, she dedicated the last decades of her life to painting portraits of prominent african-americans. more on her life from michigan women forward
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george washington carver (1942)
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mary mcleod bethune (1943)
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jane mathilda bolin (1944)
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dr. anna arnold hedgeman (1945)
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joe louis (1946)
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ruth temple (1948)
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mary mills (1952)
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marian anderson (1955)
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thurgood marshall (1956)
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nemfrog · 10 months ago
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Woman with Bouquet. ca. 1940. Laura Wheeler Waring.
Brooklyn Museum
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biscuitsarenice · 8 months ago
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“Harlem Jumped.” - African American artist Faith Ringgold 
imagine - Faith Ringgold - Tell It Like It Is
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resultsofimagination · 2 months ago
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Untitled (Cracked watermelon) - Charles Ethan Porter (c. 1890)
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jareckiworld · 8 hours ago
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Ernie Barnes (1938-2009) — Sax Player (charcoal on textured buff wove paper, 1995)
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hajandrade · 3 months ago
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Kehinde Wiley (American, b. 1977), Officer of the Hussars, 2007, oil on canvas; Detroit Institute of Arts.
[MORE]
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nobrashfestivity · 4 months ago
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In 1962 at the age of 71, Joseph E. Yoakum (1891–1972) reported having a dream that inspired him to draw. Thereafter the retired veteran began a daily practice and over the next 10 years produced some 2,000 works.
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handweavers · 3 months ago
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blocks, bars and strips by essie bendolph pettway, 2018. part of the gee's bend collective. the women of gee's bend - a small, remote, black community in alabama, whose residents are mostly descended from slaves who worked the fields of the local pettway plantation - have created hundreds of quilt masterpieces dating from the early twentieth century to the present.
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quintusenniusfidelis · a year ago
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Intimacy by Thomas Blackshear
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dailyhistoryposts · 3 months ago
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'The Migration of the Negro, Panel no. 1.' (1941) Jacob Lawrence. Tempera on hardboard.
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inmybagathaharkness · 9 months ago
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Aaliyah
Artist: artbyayala
byayala.com
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pwlanier · 22 days ago
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WOSENE WORKE KOSROF (ETHIOPIAN-AMERICAN, B. 1950)
Almost Spring
Oil on canvas
Butterscotch Auction
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taf-art · 2 months ago
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What’s Going On (1974). Barkley L. Hendricks.
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jareckiworld · 14 days ago
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Ernie Barnes (1938-2009) — Trumpet Solo  [oil on canvas, 1970s]
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hoodoogardens · a year ago
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Clementine Hunter was born around 1886 and was the granddaughter of an enslaved person. She was the eldest of seven children to Creole parents. Hunter was a self-taught artist from the Cane River region of the U.S. state of Louisiana, who lived and worked on Melrose Plantation. She is the first African-American artist to have a solo exhibition at the present-day New Orleans Museum of Art.
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