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#ancient egypt
ancientegyptdaily · 3 months ago
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Modern papyrus makers. [source]
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tearstainonletter · a month ago
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holding hands
raised hands of great finesse, kom ombo temple - egypt // holding hands, persepolis - iran // egyptian colossal of ramesses II and the goddess sekhmet // temple of horus at edfu
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destinyscave · 4 months ago
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When Future Meets Past .....
Egypt parades 22 of their ancient kings and queens through the streets of Cairo as they’re being transferred to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization
The Pharaohs Golden Parade
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ancientegyptdaily · a month ago
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Italian conservator Lorenza D'Alessandro working on the conservation of the tomb of Nefertari, QV66, in the 1980s.
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rudjedet · a month ago
Sorry to add to your long list of asks, but:
I can haz 'Thutmose loved his cat' story?
Oh don't worry, I love talking about Thutmose and his cat!
Anyway, so crown prince Thutmose was the son of Amenhotep III and would have succeeded him had he not died (we don't know what of) prior to Amenhotep III himself. We don't know a lot about Thutmose, but we do know he loved his cat so much that, upon her death, she got her own cat-sized limestone sarcophagus.
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It even has Nephthys and Isis portrayed at the head- and foot-ends, just like a human sarcophagus would have:
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The cat's name was Ta-miu, and she will be remembered because of the love a prince who died ~3300 years ago had for her.
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leforetenchante · 3 months ago
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Gold Hyksos Headband with Heads of Gazelles and a Stag, ca. 1648–1540 B.C. via The Met. This diadem inspired many of the crowns and belts in Valentino’s Fall 2015 Couture collection.
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j-k-i-ng · a month ago
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“Pyramids of Giza” by | Karim Amr
Al Haram, Giza Governorate, Egypt
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rudjedet · a month ago
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Now that we're on this spree of heartwarming or -breaking ancient Egyptian stuff, do you guys want to see a few Egyptian dog names? The internet cast the Egyptians as cat people pur sang, but the fact that crown prince Thutmose named his cat is actually a rare thing. Cats were kept mostly as pest control and, despite occassionally being portrayed on stelae and reliefs, didn't often seem to be considered companian animals. But dogs? Dogs were, and they always had names.
bHkAi, “Gazelle”
AbAqr, “Hound” (Old Berber)
phts, “Black one”
tqrw, “Khenfet-kettle”
tknrw (?)
Hmw-m-mA, “The-tail-is-as-a-lion’s”
djw-nw, “The fifth”
n-mr.n=i, “I don’t like”
anx.w, “Living one”
TAw-n-anx-n-snbi, “Breath-of-life-for-Senebi”
mniw-pw, “He is a shepherd”
aia, “Woofer”
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theancientworld · 3 months ago
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 Egyptian faience hippopotami
"When placed in tombs, they were meant to supply the deceased with regenerative power and to guarantee his or her rebirth. Since the ancient Egyptians also feared these animals and believed that depictions of them could magically come alive, the legs of many such statuettes were probably broken off deliberately, thus eliminating the animal’s destructive potential."
Hippopotami in Ancient Egypt
Isabel Stünkel
Department of Egyptian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
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nemfrog · a month ago
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A man stands on Ramses II lap. Abu Simbel. Egypt. 1911.
Internet Archive
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rudjedet · 26 days ago
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look I know we all love our shitty copper jokes and those are great and all, but you lot have seriously been sleeping on the absolute menace that is Paneb
among the many crimes of this man, foreman of the workman's village of Deir el-Medina, is making the men under his authority look after his cow for two months because he was too fucking lazy to do it himself, and then spending his time getting drunk a lot in various places
one of which being the tomb of a pharaoh. on wine stolen from that same tomb. while sat on pharaoh's own damn sarcophagus because fuck pharaoh, I guess
here, we've got receipts (Pap. Salt 124, recto I:11):
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man was a fucking trainwreck of drunkenness, violence, and exploitation
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ancientegyptdaily · 3 months ago
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Dr. Mostafa Waziri secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities talking about the new excavation of town on the west bank of Luxor [X].
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peashooter85 · 4 months ago
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The Ancient Egyptian Obelisk in the Middle of New York's Central Park
Standing amidst the serene beauty of Central Park in New York City is a 21 meter tall (69 feet) Ancient Egyptian obelisk that dates to around 1475 BC. Complete with ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, it's certainly an oddity to behold considering that it's located in a city that is 3,000 years younger than it approximately 5,600 miles away from it's home country.
Called "Cleopatra's Needle", the obelisk was originally commissioned by pharaoh Thutmose II in 1475 BC and erected in the city of Heliopolis. Two hundred years later the pharaoh Ramses II added the hieroglyphic inscriptions to the obelisk celebrating his military victories. In 575 BC the obelisk was toppled by an invading Persian army after conquering Egypt. In the 1st century BC the obelisk was rediscovered, and ordered by Queen Cleopatra to be transported to the Caesareum in Alexandria, a temple built to memorialize Julius Caesar.
The obelisk would remain there until 1879. A mere decade before the Suez Canal had been completed, making Egypt an important hub of international trade and commerce between rapidly expanding colonial empires. Thus the Egyptians began to foster close diplomatic ties with the world powers, and this diplomacy often started with the gifting of priceless artifacts and monuments. Cleopatra's Needle was given as a gift to the United States by the Khedive of Egypt in 187y, and in August of 1879 the obelisk was removed from it's foundation, placed on a wooden steamship, and shipped across the ocean where it was to be re-erected in New York City.
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The obelisk was laid in place on October 2nd 1880 after being paraded up 5th Ave along with 5,000 local Mason's and 50,000 spectators. The official erection ceremony (lol) occurred on February 22nd, 1881.
The obelisk still stands in Central Park, under the care of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Under the foundation of the obelisk is buried a time capsule containing a copy of the 1870 US census, a Bible, a Webster’s Dictionary, the complete works of William Shakespeare, a guide to Egypt, a copy of the Declaration of Independence, and a lockbox containing unknown objects.
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rudjedet · a month ago
do you have a favourite Egypt fact about how humans have always been so truly human?
Oh, I have so many. The fact that we know of dog names, for example, or that we can see thumb prints in certain items of pottery or the little bits of graffiti made by workmen on unseen places of stelae and statuary, how much crown prince Thutmose loved his cat, or the entirety of medicine, because what is more human than seeing pain and trying to alleviate the suffering?
But one of my favourites that I don't talk nearly enough about is the attendance lists of workmen (most notably from Deir el Medina). On these ostraka, the scribe of the village would record which workman was absent on which day, often with a reason for the absence appended. The most common reason is simply given as "mr", "ill". Very rarely, the illness is specified, such as workman Nakhtamun who, in year 40 of Ramses II's reign, on day 16 and 17 of the first month of Shemu, was absent because of an eye disease. One of his colleagues was once let off work for a day or two because of sore feet (cause otherwise unspecified).
Deaths or sickness of a family member, or even the sickness of a fellow workman who wasn't otherwise related, were also reasons for absence, and one of the most common workplace hazards was being stung by a scorpion. Though some of the reasons for absence are of the type "oh sure pal", such as Paneb claiming his cow is sick (look Paneb we know you, you just woke up hungover and didn't feel like going in to work), others are downright interesting for their cultural implications, such as absences where the reason given is connected to a wife or daughter.
The most common suggestion for that particular absence is that the woman in question was menstruating. However, based on the overall absences with this reason, it seems a little tenuous because it would mean that the women of Deir el Medina menstruated very rarely, hardly ever. The latest suggestion is that we should see this absence in the light of the wife or daughter in question giving birth, and the rituals and festivities surrounding that.
Now thanks to these attendance lists we've been able to reconstruct morbidity patterns, and through those inferred the existence of seasonal, short-term infectious gastrointestinal diseases that would have plagued the villagers and affected morbidity rate and health patterns. And that is the most humanising thing, if you ask me.
The people of Deir el Medina lived, laughed, and occasionally shat their hearts out, just like the rest of us.
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