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The Woman will be released on Blu-ray on May 15 via Arrow Video. Vanessa McKee designed the new cover art; the original poster is in the reverse side.

The 2011 horror film is directed by Lucky McKee (May), who co-wrote the screenplay with Jack Ketchum, based on Ketchum’s 2010 novel of the same name. Pollyanna McIntosh, Angela Bettis, Sean Bridgers, and Lauren Ashley Carter star.

The Woman has been newly restored in 4K, supervised by McKee, with the original DTS-HD MA 5.1 audio. Special features are listed below.

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brokehorrorfan
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Solid Metal Nightmares: The Films of Shinya Tsukamoto Blu-ray
Arrow | 1987-2018 | 10 Movies | 754 min | Not rated | Apr 28, 2020 

One of the most distinctive and celebrated names in modern Japanese cinema, there s no other filmmaker quite like Shinya Tsukamoto. Since his early days as a teenager making Super 8 shorts, he has remained steadfastly independent, garnering widespread acclaim while honing his own unique and instantly recognizable aesthetic on the margins of the industry. Frequently exploring themes of urban alienation, physical transformation and psychosexual obsession, his films cross genre boundaries, defying straightforward classification. This exclusive collection gathers together eight feature-length films and two shorts from Tsukamoto s diverse filmography, including his most recent offering his samurai drama Killing, making its home video premiere.

Includes:

Tetsuo: The Iron Man, Tetsuo II: Body Hammer, Tokyo Fist, Bullet Ballet, A Snake of June, Vital, Kotoko, Killing, The Adventure of Denchu-Kozo, Haze

High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentations of all ten films Original lossless PCM 1.0 mono audio 

curatorofthisdigitalmorass
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Why Don’t You Just Die will be released on Blu-ray on April 21 via Arrow Video. The 2018 Russian film has drawn comparisons to Quentin Tarantino, Edgar Wright, and Sam Raimi.

The splatterpunk action comedy marks the feature debut of writer-director Kirill Sokolov. Aleksandr Kuznetsov, Vitaliy Khaev, Evgeniya Kregzhde, Michael Gor, and Elena Shevchenko star.

Why Don’t You Just Die is presented in high definition with lossless DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 and PCM 2.0 stereo soundtracks with English subtitles. It features reversible artwork. Read on for the extras.

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brokehorrorfan
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Picked this up a few months ago, blind buy. Somehow missed it back in the 90s.

I watched the Ulysses cut, which apparently has 40 minutes added for its TV showing, plus previously censored bits restored.

So, not a bad flick. Maybe bit off more than it could handle but I can’t fault ambition. The sailing scenes are beautiful, the kid is just the right amount of precocious and Costner is just a darn good actor.

I’m always intrigued when I watch an extended cut like this and have trouble thinking where they could have cut 40 minutes. There’s some trims I’d do here and there, but it’s also great to have a story that just lets itself be in its own place for a while.

Not a fantastic film, but certainly one worth checking out especially with all the goodies in this set (three cuts plus making-of’s, poster and booklet).

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The latest issue of Neo has more information about Arrow Video’s upcoming Gamera Blu-ray box set, all of it good. Except… this is getting released in the U.S. too, right? RIGHT?

astoundingbeyondbelief
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Arrow Video has officially thrown its hat into the ring! Here’s hoping they make Criterion and Toho (but mostly Toho) look foolish.

(From Home Cinema Choice #305, page 33; discovered by Joseph Goodman on Toho Kingdom.)

astoundingbeyondbelief
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Sometimes I nerd out over film remasters or restoration projects, and sometimes talk about the ridiculous cost of some of these items, so I thought I’d share why I think this stuff is so important/cool.

All of these screencaps are from the 80s horror film The Hills Have Eyes, Part 2. The top frame is from the standard blu-ray that was released. That is the best most smaller budget or genre films ever receive. The blacks are crushed (you can’t even see that there’s a driver’s seat behind her), the color palette is all wrong (very yellow/green and dingy looking), and there’s almost no detail in her face or hair. It’s a very poor master.

Compare that with the Arrow Video restoration below it and you see just how fantastic an old movie with a new scan of the original film elements can look. Colors, actual colors! Depth. Details. Contrast. It’s all there!

I love that smaller restoration labels (like Arrow, Scream Factory, Criterion Collection, etc) take on these projects. No, The Hills Have Eyes, Part 2 is not a masterpiece of cinema. No, it won’t sell millions of copies. And yes, at the very least it had already received a blu-ray release, even if it was a bad blu-ray release (a lot of smaller budget or genre films simply don’t get blu-ray releases at all).

But fans of these types of films are very grateful that restoration labels exist. And I personally buy as many titles as I think I’ll watch, to help ensure they have the funds to continue their work.

Here are a few more comparisons to show off just how much work goes into these restorations…

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Look at all the different colors on the bikes in the restoration, most of which is completely absent in the standard release. Or the details in the shaded side of the building. Or the trees on the right… definition-less blobs in the standard release, thick and dense and detailed in the reissue.

This one speaks for itself…

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And while this last one is less drastic, look at how sickly and orange everyone looks in the standard release, vs the natural skin tones in the restoration (not to mention all the details in the clothing as well)…

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So yeah. The technical and historical aspects of these restorations always fascinate me (and sometimes piss me off when great films lay around with nothing more than a terrible DVD (480i) master). They’re not cheap (restored films from Arrow, Scream, Criterion, et al tend to retail for $27-$30 new, with most selling for much more once they’re out of print), but, in my opinion, they are usually worth the price, and usually the best the films have ever and will ever look.

[PS. most of this also applies to the music remasters I buy from reissue labels like Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs, Audio Fidelity, Analogue Productions, and others… but music restorations are more difficult to explain in a single frame, unlike the film examples above]

alandistro
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