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#bashkir
soviet-amateurs · 4 months ago
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The forestry worker taking wild rabbits to higher grounds during a flood, 1979
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miss-mollys-ballet-blog · 7 months ago
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Lilia Zainigabdinova in Swan Lake.
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my-russia · 9 months ago
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Bashkir national costume
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ubyr-babaj · 6 months ago
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a Slav writer I know: he was so steppe and mysterious the only thing one can think of is his Eastern hands holding an Eastern dagger drenched in sand and blood, hot tea on the hot day.
my very Tatar dad: HOLLY SHIT SANYA WE'RE IN KAZAN AND I JUST SAW A FOOD DELIVERY BOT FOR THE FIRST TIME. IT JUST WENT ABOUT ON ITS BOT BUSINESS. THE KIDS ARE GOING APESHIT SANYA.
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helenvader · 3 months ago
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@yototothelalafell You have mentioned the Bashkir, so of course I had to go to YouTube and I have found a dance video and a music video. :-)
youtube
youtube
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yadatasi · a year ago
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moodboard: Başkurdistan
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hdxxa · 9 months ago
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Bashkir women by Losenko on DeviantArt
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possessivesuffix · 10 months ago
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Speaking of the topic of "thibilation" in Turkic, here is an overview by Min Maak Zi of this change in Bashkir dialects:
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The standard view I've usually seen is that *s > initial /h/, mediofinal /θ/. Apparently this comes with quite a bit of positional variation though, including also several island dialects (light blue, khaki, grey) that have a preceding assimilation *s-ʃ > /ʃ-ʃ/ — seemingly proving that *s > θ is late areal drift. This also claims the "h" reflexes to vary between pharyngeal, uvular, velar, and even epiglottal (I wonder if this is somehow over-transcribed, when plain [h] makes no appearence).
An interesting further feature is the small eastern area with *ps > ? *ph > /ɸː/ and *ks > ? *kh > /xː/ (supposed to be two dialect areas really but I can't find the darker purplish brown anywhere on the map). This has a close typological parallel in Vasjugan Selkup where *s > /h/ similarly goes with *ps > ? *ph > /f/.
The source presentation is on the dialectology of Volga–Ural Turkic in general and argues also that the traditional definition of "Bashkir" is polyphyletic and "Tatar" is at least paraphyletic. There seems to be a narrower monophyletic group that includes most of Bashkir, but e.g. the NE Håljot dialect turns out to be basically an "areally Bashkirized" variety of Siberian Tatar; itself seemingly a monophyletic group, but also not closely related to the Volga region "Tatar" varieties. He even suggests it might be not Volga–Uralic in the first place and maybe an independent branch of the Kipchak group of Turkic. Sounds plausible geographically at least, and the division between Volga Tatar and Siberian Tatar is a previously known theory anyway. (Glottolog for some reason however has an even wilder position of Siberian Tatar as a sibling group of South Siberian Turkic and thus not even Kipchak.)
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foreverturan · a year ago
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Bashkir girls with a horse
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logofellow · a year ago
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Ete kyz(Seven girls) is an old Bashkort story about seven sisters. Within the wartime these seven sisters try to return to their homeland but the road is filled with enemies that want to hunt them. They fight and run away but they eventually get cornered. While they were about to get captured they jump from a cliff to a lake for saving themselves and their honour. In poem, It says that after they jumped from cliff they ran up to sky and became seven stars. These seven stars were called Yedigir, or with the name you're more familiar with: Ursa Major.
And people sang this song after Seven Girls:
When they were returning to their homeland
These seven girls stayed together
They promised themselves
To wait for their beloveds
Ay seven girls, seven girls
There is no one in home even if you return
Protected their honour and sank into the lake
They have no beloved to lose
In the deep river full of lotus flowers
The river that I drink
The river that took seven girls
And spreads sadness
Ay the seven girls, the seven girls
There is no one in home even if you returned
Protected their honour and sank into the lake
They have no beloved to lose
Black stones of snowy forest
May our little ones live long
Without taking the revenge of seven girls
My bones shall not enter to the grave
Ay seven girls, seven girls
There is no one in home even if you returned
Protected their honour and sank into the lake
They have no beloved to lose
When they were returning to their homeland
The seven girls stayed together
The seven girls promised themselves
To wait for their beloveds
Ay seven girls, seven girls
There is no one even if I returned to home
Protected their honour and sank into the lake
They have no beloved to lose
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jelan-bike · 2 years ago
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What I really hate about belonging to a turkic nation is whenever you try to become a part of the the national community, everyone will try to invalid you as a person of your nation.
You are not 100% pureblood, you don't speak your native language fluently, you have a different surname and name, you live on the territory where there are a lot of mixed marriages, your appearance isn't usual for your nation, you are not Muslim.
Anything. Anything will be a reason why people of your nation or some other turkic nations will scream and shout that you are not a true(TM), you cannot belong to your nation, you are a halfblood, a Mankurt.
And they don't give a single shit that you love your origin, you want know more about it, you want to learn the language, history and culture.
I'm honestly sick of this cult of purebloodness in national turkic societies. Aside even other prejudices like awfull sexism and homophobia.
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gwendolynlerman · a year ago
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Languages of the world
Bashkir (башҡортса‎)
Basic facts
Number of native speakers: 1.2 million
Official language: Bashkiria (Russia)
Language of diaspora: Kazakhstan
Script: Cyrillic, 46 letters
Grammatical cases: 6
Linguistic typology: agglutinative, SOV
Language family: Turkic, Common Turkic, Kipchak, North Kipchak
Number of dialects: 3 main dialects
History
1920s - creation of the literary language
1923 - creation of a writing system based on the Arabic script
1930 - replacement with the Unified Turkic Latin Alphabet
1939 - replacement with an adapted Cyrillic alphabet
Writing system and pronunciation
These are the letters that make up the alphabet: а б в г ғ д ҙ е ё ж з и й к ҡ л м н ң о ө п р с ҫ т у ү ф х һ ц ч ш щ ъ ы ь э ә ю я.
Grammar
Nouns have no gender, two numbers (singular and plural) and six cases (nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, locative, and ablative).
Adjectives only take suffixes when functioning as nouns, otherwise they are used as invariable attributes. There are no articles and prepositions. The latter are replaced by postpositions.
Verbs are conjugated for tense, mood (indicative, imperative, conditional, and optative), person, and number. The verb “to be” is not used with nouns or adjectives.
Dialects
There are three dialect groups: Southern, or the mountain dialect; Eastern, also known as the steppe or prairie dialect, and Northwestern. The standard language is based on the Southern dialect with some elements of the Eastern one.
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geoazie · a year ago
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Turkic ethnies part 2 !
The Bashkirs are a Turkic people inhabitants of the region of Bashkorstan officially in Russia. They speak bashkir and russian. They are Sunni muslim. There are around 2 millions of them.
The Nogais are a Turkic people inhabitants of the region of Stavropol and Dagestan officially in Russia. They speak nogai and russian. They are Sunni muslim. There are around 120 000 of them.
The Turks or Turkish are a Turkic people inhabitants of the country of Turkey. They speak turk. They are muslim. There are around 75.7 millions of them, with almost 3 millions of them in Germany.
The Tatars are a group of Turkic people inhabitants of the region of Tatarstan officially in Russia. They speak russian, tatar, siberian tatar, or crimean tatar. They are Sunni muslim. There are 6.8 to 12.8 millions of them, with 5 millions in Russia, 400 000 in Uzbekistan and 319 000 in Crimea.
The Tuvans or Tuvinians are a Turkic people inhabitants of the region of Tuva, officially in Russia. They speak tuvan, russian, mongolian and chinese. They are Tibetan buddhist, and tengrist. There are around 300 000 of them.
The Yakuts or Sakha are a Turkic people inhabitants of the region of Yakutia officially in Russia. They speak yakut and russian. They are shaman, and eastern orthodox. There are around 500 000 of them.
Those aesthetics are part of a serie. I’m covering the biggest ethnies of the world, starting by Europe. We are now covering Asian and European ethnies (I’ve spoken a bit soon saying we finished european ethnies. Next time, we do.)
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ubyr-babaj · a year ago
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It’s so fucking funny that Russian radical feminism is such a white Slav-dominated space they legit don't see the difference between representation done by and for indigenous people and racist caricatures.
Like they don’t see the difference between this:
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And this:
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And recommend both as “representation of Native women” even if the second is a “Central Asian princess” (c) from a disgustingly racist cartoon. Not to mention that them Slav TERFs would hate both of these women guts if they were real, like they hate every non-white and/or Muslim woman in our country.
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sartorialadventure · 3 years ago
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The Republic of Bashkortostan, also historically known as Bashkiria, is a federal subject of Russia (a republic (state)). It is located between the Volga River and the Ural Mountains. Its capital is the city of Ufa. Bashkortostan is the most populous republic in Russia.
The Bashkirs are a Turkic ethnic group, indigenous to Bashkortostan and to the historical region of Badzhgard, extending on both sides of the Ural Mountains, in the area where Eastern Europe meets North Asia. Most Bashkirs speak the Bashkir language, closely related to Tatar and Kazakh languages which belongs to the Kipchak branch of the Turkic languages and share cultural affinities with the broader Turkic peoples. In religion the Bashkirs are mainly Sunni Muslims of the Hanafi madhhab.
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art-zoratrix · 2 years ago
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Another set of Headshot commissions. All characters belong to their owners!
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aymilleti · 3 years ago
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İlnara Rahmangulova - başkurt kızı - bashkir girl
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kimmariesembroidery · 3 years ago
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So here is my finished Tubeteika.  A well known hat design in Central Asia I made my own design using common Bashkir and Turkmen motifs freely available in design books along with a color scheme that is common in Bucovina.  So kind of an East meets West mix.  The thing I like about it is that not only can you wear it as a hat, you could also technically make another one in plain white cloth slightly smaller and use it as a small jewelry box.  As you can see in the construction process I basically made 4 triangle/rectangle pieces and then stitched the together.  To make it nice and stiff I used a Fabric stabilizer which I ironed on the inside of the hat.  
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turkuasia · 3 years ago
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Башкирка
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ayearinlanguage · 3 years ago
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A Year in Language, Day 273: Bashkir Bashkir is a Turkic language spoken by over 1 million people. Like many minority languages in Russia it is the linguistic heritage of a specific ethnic group with their own state, in this case the Bashkir of Bashkortostan. It belongs to the Kipchak branch of the Turkish family and is most closely related to Tatar. Up to the 1920's Bashkir was written in Arabic script. In the 30's it switched to Latin script, and then to Cyrillic in the 40's (both of these swaps were Soviet enforced). It has many of the typical trappings of a Turkic language such as a highly agglutinative grammar (lots of affixes), and vowel harmony (vowels in affixes assimilate to those of the root).
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