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#batik three piece collection
my-2020-vlogs · a year ago
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থি পিছ কালেকশন | ব্যবসায়ীদের জন্য পাইকারি সন্ধান | three piece collectio...
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creations-by-chaosfay · 9 months ago
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Tell me about the quilts. I just started my journey of learning to be 3rd (4th?) Generation quilter in my family. Tell me about the colors. I love colors.
Ooooo! Colors!
When unsure of where to start, choose a focal fabric. That's gonna be your main character in the story of what you make. From there, decide on a pattern first. This will help you determine how many other fabrics to choose and what size you want the print. If the pieces are gonna be small, you're gonna want a small print. Large pieces can have big prints without just parts of the print being seen, especially if the print has widely spaced bits with a plain solid background. A rose print sounds great, but what if those roses are large with over an inch between each of them? Cutting into the roses may produce nifty effects, but that spacing will create blank sections that sorta just float around.
If you like a fabric but don't have any idea what pattern you wanna use it for, buy no less than two yards. Find some fabrics that go with it, and then seek out a pattern that fits what you have. This is what I typically do, with no less than six fabrics all together. If the pattern calls for only three of the six, I make adjustments, like halving the amount of fabric for the pieces in order to use all six.
When purchasing fabric online, buy either in bundles of collections (they automatically go together in most cases) or from the same designer (they tend to use the same inks across all their designs). This will make matching fabrics much easier. If that shade of purple is one shade off, it's gonna look odd.
If you decided to work with monochromatic, make sure the fabric has the same tone. Example? Some pinks have a cooler/bluer tone while others have a warmer/browner tone. If you use different tones, they're gonna clash. Use the class of cold or warm across the quilt unless the mix looks right.
Keep colorblind folks in mind. If tones are too close together, they'll blend. To test it out, take black and white pictures or use a colorblind filter. This will help you find the contrast. It's also a good idea to practice doing this for those who aren't colorblind. If you have a bunch of neons in a quilt without something to contrast them, like black or white, they're gonna look like a blob. It's why the Twister mat doesn't look so washed out.
Brown isn't a bad color! Just don't use a lot of it in a single quilt unless muddy oatmeal is the look you want. I use a lot of brown, but in such a way that it balances things or makes parts pop. Use it in print or hint-of-a-print if you can. That'll break up the brown and not leave a dirt patch look.
Use quilt shop quality wherever possible. They're often the same price as the discount store product. Those batiks at Joann Fabrics cost the same as the quilt shop quality, but the Joann Fabrics version have horrible texture and are way too stiff.
Grunge print is a great substitute for solids. I've seen it sold only at quilt shops, but it's well worth every penny.
When stuck on trying to figure out where to even start with colors, visit the scrap/end of bolt bin at any fabric store. Those are odd sizes and at discount prices. I raid those bins at every quilt shop and the employees love me for it (those things fill up fast!). I use the smaller pieces for practice blocks, which is why I have so many table runners and mats.
Before sewing all the blocks together, step back and take make pictures with different layouts. Then put it all away for a couple days before looking at the pictures again. You'll see what would've been missed because your eyes had been smothered and blinded by the fabrics. With a break, they pick up on details. I make a point of doing this for anything larger than 40x40 inches.
Using nothing but solids is boring and makes me sleepy. Too much blah. If you fear prints, get over it by making a bunch of small things, like coasters, place mats, and table runners. You'll learn how to make things play well together and get more comfortable with options.
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livinh20 · 10 months ago
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Congratulations Electric Quilt! - Celebrating 30 Years
Join the celebration! I have.
I began using Electric Quilt in 2018 when I became an Island Batik Ambassador. Since then I use it exclusively for all my projects including patterns I design for publications like Quiltmaker and Fons & Porter's Quick + Easy Quilts.
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Don’t let fear of technology prevent you from learning and using a tool that can add value to your personal and professional life. For months, I put off purchasing EQ8 because “I did not want to learn another software program.” I convinced myself that I did not have the time.
Do what I did. Be kind to yourself and learn at your own pace. Play first. Click, read and experiment for fun. Then, take advantage of the free tutorials, peer help and value-priced educational books.
Visit Electric Quilt for more Pearls of Wisdom from many of our favorite quilters.
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SPECIAL OFFER Get the Quilt Pattern Bundle
Designing Color Wave in EQ8 was made easy with the fabric import feature. Importing fabric swatches and placing them in designs is an important part of my process. Color Wave, a beginner-friendly lap quilt was designed to feature an assortment of colors from one fabric collection.
Color Wave - A Quilting Plan
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Electric Quilt 8 features are great for designing and pattern writing. There are several patterns available for purchase as a PDF download. Patterns included step-by-step color instructions, coloring pages and more.
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Electric Quilt a big part of my ruler quilting classes too! I design quilt panel for several classes. The small pre-printed quilt panels are perfect classroom projects.
Are you ready to take one of my classes? Learn about my in-person event schedule and my new online on-demand classes. Consider taking one of three ruler classes at Quilt Con 2022 in Phoenix, AZ. View the Catalog and Registration .
GIVEAWAY
Enter for a chance to win a copy of the printed Living Water Quilter, LLC pattern, Color Wave. It is a beginner friendly pattern designed in EQ8 and features Island Batik fabrics. The pattern giveaway is for US residents only and a winner will be selected at random.
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To enter, answer the question below by leaving your answer in a comment section below this post. You may comment as a guest by selecting the guest option. (If you don't see the comment section below go to top right of post, and click comment. DESKTOP & LAPTOP).
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Giveaway closes Tuesday, August 31  at 11:59pm ET. Winner will be chosen at random. Winner has a week to respond; after a week a new winner is selected at random.
QUESTION: Do you prefer sewing quilt patterns that are rotary cut, foundation paper-pieced or made with templates?
UPDATE Sept, 1.
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fashionbooksmilano · 2 years ago
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A Royal Treasure
The Javanese Batik Collection of King Chulalongkorn of Siam
Edited by Dale Carolyn Gluckman Sarttarat Mudding Piyanan Petcharaburanin With Contributions by Judi Achjadi, Dale Carolyn Gluckman Sarttarat Muddin, Sandra Niessen
River Books, Bangkok 2019, 320 pages, Over 680 colour illustrations & 4 maps ISBN  978 616 8044 05 6
euro 98,00
email if you want to buy [email protected]
On each of his three visits to Indonesia, the Thai monarch King Chulalongkorn returned home to Siam with pieces of handmade batik. Preserved by the Bureau of the Royal Household at the Grand palace since 1910, the year the king passed away, the collection totals over 300 pieces and today provides key documentation of the batik made in West and Central Java during the second half of the 19th century, with many rare and beautiful pieces from famous ateliers of the day. This exquisite collection was presented to the public for the first time at the Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles in Bangkok in November 2018. Published to coincide with the exhibition, A Royal Treasure contains a detailed catalogue of the collection and is enhanced by rare archival photographs of the king’s travels, the original signature notes indicating the name of the pattern and who was allowed to wear it, and the palace inventory tags. Lavishly produced, and written and researched by leading experts in the field, this book is an important contribution to the field of Indonesian textiles and a visual feast for textile lovers worldwide.
20/12/19
orders to:     [email protected]
ordini a:        [email protected]
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thekenseyjean · 3 years ago
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Indonesian Diversity NYFW
New Post has been published on http://kenseyjean.com/index.php/2018/10/05/indonesian-diversity-nyfw/
Indonesian Diversity NYFW
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Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Indonesian Diversity NYFW SS19 starred three designers; Vivi Zubedi, Kimberly Tandra, and Coreta Louise. The purpose of the multi-collection is to drive awareness to Indonesian culture and their home. The opening featured dancers
Vivi Zubedi
Vivi Zubedi’s NYFW SS19 Collection was inspired by the city of Marrakech. Vivi incorporated her inspiration for the city with Indonesian designs and sillouhettes. Her goal is to be a worldwide affordable luxury brand, yet hold true to her commitments with her customers needs. The designs were vibrant with floral touches and spirng colors; a great refreshing touch to her already breathtaking NYFW FW18 Winter Collection. My favorites being the bright yellow and classy silhouettes.
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Suedeson by Kimberly Tandra
Suedeson’s NYFW SS19 Collection “Nucleus” collection comes from the designers own personal experiences in diverging into the world of Couture. The pieces take inspiration from different races and cultures. There is a juxtaposition at play where two seemingly diverse details are used in the same look. Delicate looks next to bold looks; leather with hand-sewn details. Headpieces, batik, oversized bell sleeves were also used. While the leather can be seen as bold, materials such as silk, cotton, and organza balanced the look out and brought it down to earth; grounded.
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Coretta Louise
Coretta Louise’s NYFW SS19 Collection, “Tropical Haven”, informed the world that tasteful batik designs can be worn in an elegant and modern manner. The hand painted silk can be worn in both in the urban area or in the everyday life; bringing a little tasteful elegance to any place or situation. Handwoven silk, organza, and tafetta lined the runway this season in the vibrant colors of gold, maroon, terracotta, and midnight blues.
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
Photographer Kensey Jean – www.KenseyJean.com
About Indonesian Diversity
“Indonesian Diversity in cooperation with Indonesia Fashion Gallery will have a special emphasis on celebrating Batik this season celebrating its origins in Indonesia that has inspired designers all over the world. Indonesian Diversity proudly presents two luxury ready-to-wear labels from Indonesia: Suedson by Kimberly Tandra, and Coreta Louise. Kimberly Tandra, the designer behind Suedson is currently living in Paris and will showcase a collection featuring Batik motif with a print technique that results in eye-catching designs. Coreta Louise pays homage to Batik, which originated in Indonesia by drawing inspiration from prints found all over the country and modernizing them to create silhouettes and fresh prints that are sellable to the international market.”
Source: NYFW.com
By KenseyJean
Photos and Media are Copyrighted KenseyJean, please ask for permission (and properly credit and link back to my site/social media) before using.
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inquiringquilter · 6 months ago
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My December Island Batik Challenge
The Island Batik Ambassador challenge for December was to create a quilt using English Paper Piecing.
We could design anything we wanted, any size, as long as we used epp as the construction technique.
I created a simple hexagon design using Electric Quilt and printed out templates on cardstock.
Luckily, I’d taken a class at the shop earlier this year on English Paper Piecing, so I had my supplies ready. To try this technique, you’ll need paper templates, a glue stick, hand piecing needles, thimble, scissor snips, mini clips, magnets, and lightweight thread. I chose 80 wt. Aurifil.
Don’t know if you know it, but Aurifil makes all kinds of thread! From machine piecing and quilting and machine applique to hand quilting and piecing, you’ll find that Aurifil has the exact weight of thread to get the job done. Aurifil also makes floss!
The quilt shop I work at recently expanded to carry all of Aurifil’s 50 wt colors, plus a great selection of 40 and 80 wt. I’m so lucky to work there because whatever I need is right at hand. Go check it out if you want—the shop is called Always in Stitches and it’s located in Noblesville, Indiana.
English Paper Piecing or epp is a hand piecing technique. One form of slow-stitching, epp has become very popular, especially just after we were all shut down with COVID and found that we suddenly had lots of time on our hands and few people to spend it with.
Slow-stitching is relaxing and fun, and very portable! You can take your stitching anywhere and spend as much or as little time as you have simply stitching away. The first thing you do is find a pattern and templates. Then you cut out your fabric, leaving about 3/8” to 1/4” seam allowance. Having an acrylic template that matches your paper templates helps with this step. Since this was my own design I didn’t have any acrylic templates so I improvised, cutting my pieces from strips and using the 60 degree lines on my ruler to help.
Next, you fold the fabric back on the paper templates and glue it down to keep the seam allowance out of the way when you stitch the shapes together. I used the Quilter’s Select glue pen and I love it! It’s easy to handle and keeps your glue stick nice and soft.
I also used mini clips to hold the fabric as I glued each edge, to keep it from slipping. You can also use small magnets to hold the fabric nice and firm against the paper template while you glue. I got a set of three in my EPP starter kit from the shop.
After you get the shapes glued (I did one section at a time), you’re ready to sew! I used a size 9 Straw needle but I also like a size 10-12 Sharp or Quilting/Between needle for handwork.
Hold two prepared pieced right sides together using mini clips or magnets, then stitch the seam with a whipstitch. Stitch close to the top, avoiding piercing the paper template (you’ll be able to feel it with the needle.) Use a knot at the beginning and end of the seam.
I stitched my quilt in rows rather than from the center out, to avoid partial seams. After you get each pieced stitched to another piece on every side, you can remove its paper template.
I quilted my quilt with echo quilting, about 1/4 inch inside the seams.
I think it makes a beautiful tree skirt for my little office tree.
I call my quilt Gear. Here are the quilt details:
"Gear" 12” x 14” Original Design Batiks: #111819230 Fountain Gold (Dear William collection), #121723685 Snowflake Forest (Alpine Jingle collection), Cherry (Ravishing Reds Basics collection) Binding: #121723685 Snowflake Forest (Alpine Jingle collection) Backing: #111819230 Fountain Gold (Dear William collection) Batting: Hobbs Batting 80/20 Piecing Thread: Aurifil #80 wt. #5004 (Grey Smoke) Quilting Thread: Aurifil 50 wt. #2250 (Red), #2892 (Pine), #2318 (Cachemire) Needle: Schmetz Chrome 80/12 Pieced and quilted by Jennifer Fulton
Thanks for stopping by!
Be sure to come back tomorrow to share what you’ve been working on in my weekly show-and-tell linkup, Wednesday Wait Loss
Disclosure: The products featured here were provided to me free of charge by Island Batik, Aurifil, Hobbs, AccuQuilt GO!, and Schmetz.
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Tell me…have you ever made a tree skirt?
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