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thesilicontribesman · 3 months ago
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Site of St. Trillo's Celtic Monk's Cell, Rhos-on-Sea, North Wales.
St. Trillo was a 6th century CE celtic monk who established a hermit's cell on this site. His original cell is long gone, likely constructed from wattle, daub and a wall of stones. The site was probably chosen as it is the source of a natural spring (under the altar in the current six person chapel). The current chapel is of an unknown age and has been repaired many times over centuries. It is likely that St. Trillo kept livestock in the marshes that once occupied the land which is now currently the town centre. Rhos-on-Sea gets its name from this site. The current chapel is thought to be the smallest in the UK.
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theriseofthesuccubus · 4 months ago
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“Morrigan” by Ameluria https://www.instagram.com/p/CRKnjdegm_n/?utm_medium=tumblr
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sheepfroggy · 4 months ago
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History of the Welsh language
Welsh is an ancient Celtic language that has been spoken in Britain for many hundreds of years. This may leave you wondering why not all Welsh people speak Welsh. In order to answer this, we have to take a look at the history of Wales and the Welsh language.
Nobody’s particularly too sure when Welsh began, or how. Unfortunately, old and scarcely documented history is pretty difficult to pin down like that. It is, however, widely proposed that Welsh has been around for at least roughly 4000 years. I don’t know if you’d agree, but that’s a hell of a long time! However, we do know that Welsh developed alongside closely related languages like Cornish and Breton, as well as the more distantly related Gaelic languages, across the British isles and parts of mainland Europe.
For a long time, Welsh was free to grow and develop from Old Welsh into Middle Welsh. Lots of Welsh prose was created during this time, and it is within the lifespan of Middle Welsh that the Mabinogion (a famous collection of Welsh mythologies) was compiled. Many great bards* also passed on tales in Welsh during this period. Welsh continued to thrive and grow freely for a period of time *Bards in Welsh culture are storytellers through the medium of music and poetry. They were considered to be fairly powerful in courts of nobles and are an important historical and tradtional position to have been appointed
However, trouble struck when Henry VIII was on the English throne. Wales had previously been conquered by the English and, during Henry VIIIs rule of England and Wales, the Act of Union was passed. As part of this act, the use of Welsh for administrative purposes (e.g. in laws, in the workplace) was completely banned, with the Welsh language no longer being recognised as an official language under the crown. This act meant that all students in Wales were no longer allowed to be taught in their native language and, for most people, the only language they knew at all. Children were forced to attend schools in a completely foreign language, which began the supression of Welsh. Additionally, within schools a tool of supression was used to stifle all communications in Welsh. Any child caught speaking Welsh during the school day would be made to wear the Welsh Not, which was typically a wooden board with the words “Welsh Not” painted on. The child that was wearing the Welsh Not at the end of the day would be subject to corporal punishment, which typically was a beating with a cane.
It was not until the Welsh Language Act of 1967 that the Welsh language gained any form of legal protection against the supression and brutalities faced previously. This act allowed the use of Welsh in legal proceedings within the government. However, Welsh still had a long ways to go. In 1980, members of the political party Plaid Cymru pledged that they would go to prison rather than pay for TV licenses in order to advocate for the need for a Welsh language television channel. Their efforts were successful and they were rewarded with the Welsh Fourth Channel, commonly known as S4C. Finally, in 1993, the Welsh Language Act of 1993 was passed. This act meant that, for the first time in hundreds of years, the Welsh language was now considered legally equal to that of the English language. Alongside the passing of this act came the benefits for the Welsh language that Welsh could not legally be discriminated against and must be available easily from all public bodies. This meant that all road signs in Wales could now be bilingual and that all government work must be published bilingually, to name a few examples.
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I greatly hope that I have managed to teach you something interesting, and if not that you enjoyed the read on the history of the Welsh language. As a Welsh person and Welsh speaker, this topic is very important to me and fills me to the brim with a fiery Celtic passion. I hope those of you from elsewhere can empathise with our fight to preserve our language and I hope it might encourage interest in Welsh as a whole.
Diolch am wedi darllen, Cymru am byth <3
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oldschoolfrp · 6 months ago
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Heroes of Britannia (George Parrish cover art for Heroes magazine V2, N4, Avalon Hill, 1987, also used as box art for Avalon Hill/Welt der Spiele 1st/2nd editions of the Britannia board game)
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kayleightarot · 6 months ago
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Today marks Là Bealltainn (Beltane) in my side of the world. You don't have to be Pagan or Celtic to enjoy Beltane.  If you're feeling creative, impulsive, sensual, sexual, decadent, inspired, or just generally celebratory, you've caught the Beltane vibes. Revel in them!
Happy Saturday, Lovelies
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celtichammerclub · 3 days ago
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Are you team brown bear or team polar bear?? These heavy duty stoneware bottles are available in various glazed with original Bear artwork carved into the glaze. Check out all the options here —> celtichammerclub.com/store/p135/Bear_Stoneware_Bottles.html#/ ➖ #celtichammerclub #bear #grizzly #polarbear #norse #nordic #celt #celtic #viking #vikings #stoneware #handmade #originalart #supportsmallbusiness #unique #giftideas #rusticdecor https://www.instagram.com/p/CWozx4FjG4B/?utm_medium=tumblr
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sheepfroggy · 4 months ago
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All about Wales!
My blog is all about my home country of Wales, but it recently occured to me that there are many people out there that likely have no idea about Wales's existence! So - with that in mind - let's go over some of the key facts about Wales together!
Where is Wales?
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A simple answer - Wales is in the red/orange colour on this map! It's West of England, but not far enough to be on the island of Ireland. A more complicated answer - Wales is one of the four countries that is part of the United Kingdom shown on this map (note: Ireland is not included as a part of the UK but is present on the map due to its location).
What language do they speak in Wales?
We have two official languages in Wales, and those are Welsh and English.
Welsh is a Celtic language that's related to Irish and Scottish Gaelic, to list a few examples. Welsh has been spoken in Wales for hundreds of years and was spoken in Wales long before English was.
What does the Welsh flag look like?
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Above is an image of the flag. The flag depicts a horizontal white stripe above a green stripe, with a red dragon overlayed.
Why is there a dragon on the Welsh flag?
The red dragon (also known as Y Ddraig Goch in Welsh) is used as a symbol for Wales and the Welsh people. It originates from old Welsh mythology about a great battle between a red and a white dragon but has become a generalised symbol of the Welsh people. One version of the tale of these two dragons comes from Arthurian legend (which is in fact Welsh, not English) in which the wizard Myrddin (Merlin) saw these dragons as a part of a prophecy about the resistance against the Saxons
Are there any other symbols of Wales?
Yes! We have many symbols that we use to represent us in different circumstances. The most common alternatives to the red dragon are the daffodil and the flag of St. David (shown below), which is a yellow cross over a black background. Other symbols of Wales include the red and gold lion flag of Owain Glyndwr and the gold dragon
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Is Wales in England?/Are Welsh people English?
Long story short, no! While this question is always asked innocently in intent, assuming that we are English is actually fairly offensive so please refrain from calling Welsh people England or saying that Wales is in England! Wales and England have a long history of conflict, including the English supression of Welsh language, culture and history, so we don't really like being assumed to be the same people.
Does Wales have any unique cultural celebrations?
Yes! Perhaps our most identifiable cultural event is St David's day. Similar to St Patrick's day that is celebrated in Ireland, St David's day is a day to celebrate our Welsh identity. On March 1st, people wear daffodils and wave Welsh flags and celebrate proudly our existence and culture. There are often big parades in cities and school children will usually celebrate through something called an eisteddfod. Eisteddfodau (plural of eisteddfod) are big arts celebrations that are done all over Wales to continue our old traditions of respecting poets and musicians, as well as other art forms that have been included in modern eisteddfodau.
We also celebrate the National Eisteddfod, which is the biggest annual celebration of arts in Wales. The eisteddfod is run in Welsh, but does facilitate English speakers through simultaneous translations and by producing all promotional and guide material in both English and Welsh. At the end of the eisteddfod, the overall winner is announced as being the bard, which comes from the old tradition of Welsh nobles hiring official poets and musicians and bestowing them with the high ranking social title of the bard.
I hope that this information was both interesting and helpful to some of you out there! If you are interesed in learning more about Wales, I post a lot about Wales generally, as well as the Welsh language. Diolch am darllen fy mhost :D
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medievalslimes · a year ago
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crippledgiraff · a month ago
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A c*mmissi*ned character for the client's Glorantha game, the lightning wielding man known as Offir!
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fantasy-scifi-art · 7 months ago
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Art by 头很丸 
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scotianostra · 8 months ago
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On 18 March 1286, Alexander III, King of Scots, set off on the journey that would have ramifications for Scotland for countless years.
 Now the dates differ for this,17,18 and 19th are quoted, I’ve plumped for the middle of these.
. Alexander was married to Margaret, daughter of England's Henry iii. She bore him two sons and a daughter. Margaret died in 1275. Alexander thought he was secure in heirs. Ten years passed and the untimely deaths of all his offspring forced Alexander to marry again to produce an heir. He married the young and beautiful Yolande of Dreux (who was a descendant of King Louis VI of France) on All Saints' Day, 1285.
It was in his haste to be with the beautiful Yolande that Alexander met his fate. Although urged by the ferry master at Dalmeny not to cross Forth and again on reaching Inverkeithing being rebuked by Alexander Le Saucier master of his Kitchen (who met him on landing and offered him lodging for the night) about his midnight travelling, Alexander brushed aside the warnings and insisted on going on to Kinghorn. Asking only for two escorts to guide him Alexander set off along the coast. 
No one knows what happened after that apart from that the King and the guides became separated during the storm. In the morning, Tuesday, 19th March, 1286, Alexander's body was found on the beach and that of course is why the dates differ.
Alexander's death brought to an end a rare "golden age" in Scottish History and resulted in a crisis of succession that led directly to the Wars of Independence with England. But for his decision to take that path that night, none of us would ever have heard of William Wallace, Robert the Bruce or Bannockburn: and today's Scotland could be an utterly different place. Alexander was succeeded by Margaret, Maid of Norway but she would never actually take the throne as events of her journey would also end in tragedy in Orkney, on another fateful trip in September 1290.
Pics are statues of Alexander at St Giles on the Royal Mile and The National Potrait Gallery in Edinburgh, and the monument to Alexander on  on the Burntisland-Kinghorn road, bears the following inscription:- To the illustrious Alexander III, the last of Scotland's Celtic Kings, who was accidentally killed near this spot, March XIX -MCCLXXXVI. Erected on the Sexcentenary of his death. That's 600 years to you and I although further investigation claims it was unveiled  It was unveiled on 19th July 1887, by the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, a direct descendant of King Robert the Bruce, more than a year after the inscription says.
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