Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#celtic art
thesilicontribesman · 3 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Site of St. Trillo's Celtic Monk's Cell, Rhos-on-Sea, North Wales.
St. Trillo was a 6th century CE celtic monk who established a hermit's cell on this site. His original cell is long gone, likely constructed from wattle, daub and a wall of stones. The site was probably chosen as it is the source of a natural spring (under the altar in the current six person chapel). The current chapel is of an unknown age and has been repaired many times over centuries. It is likely that St. Trillo kept livestock in the marshes that once occupied the land which is now currently the town centre. Rhos-on-Sea gets its name from this site. The current chapel is thought to be the smallest in the UK.
766 notes · View notes
artofmaquenda · 3 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Excuse me while I'm crying, looking at all these details HHHHHH inspiration juice flowing through!! *____*
203 notes · View notes
forfeda-project · 26 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
SAMHAIN
By far the best known Gaelic festival, Samhain marked the end of summer in Ireland, when assemblies were held and the cattle were brought to winter pastures. The traditional (though contested) date is usually given as November 1st, with festivities beginning at dusk on October 31st. Like with Bealtaine, the festival of Samhain is marked by bonfires and an emphasis on protection from Otherworldly forces. Syncretism with All Hallow's Eve resulted in many traditions involving the dead or the Daoine Sidhe roaming the lands on Samhain, looking to snatch away or otherwise harm those who did not observe the proper rites. As such, the wearing of disguises and the creation of charms were meant to ward away unwanted attention. Divination games were also common on Samhain, primarily concerning matters of love and marriage. Hiding trinkets such as coins or rings in plates of food and loaves of bread was the most popular method, although apples and hazelnuts were also employed. Samhain is also the setting for many of Irish mythology's most famous tales, especially stories of wooings and conceptions. Modern Scottish tradition associates Samhain with the Cailleach, the hag of winter, who rules over the colder months. The Brugh na Boinne was particularly associated with Samhain, and modern folklore describes it as the site of battles, feasts, and games carried out by the Daoine Sidhe on Samhain night. This piece features a deer skull to evoke the deer herd of the Cailleach and the traditions surrounding death, with crossed swords and the Brugh na Boinne for the Daoine Sidhe. Loaves of bannock and barmbrack, along with nuts and apples, encompass the culinary aspects of the holiday, and the quaich cup (a common sight at weddings) and divinatory trinkets hint at its more romantic overtones. Finally, bonfire flames, a carved tumshie lantern, and a parshell cross serve as charms to ward away Otherworldly dangers. Lá Fhéile Shamhna sona daoibh!
95 notes · View notes
olyademidova · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media
"Green woman" watercolor painting by Olya Demidova. This one took me quite a while to work on and today I finally finished it. I like the mood that I see in this work. Something pure, dreamy and calm.The original is looking for a new home here if you are interested in art prints you can find them here
55 notes · View notes
ritualpurposes · 11 months ago
Text
‘Celtic’ art
Celtic knotwork is beautiful, its an aesthetic I am 100% here for, but interestingly its not ‘celtic’ at all. Well not in an archaeological sense. Iron Age art work is far more abstract, with beautiful loops and swirls.  
Tumblr media
This is the Battersea Shield, dated to middle-late Iron Age. Lots more pretty pictures under the cut.
This style is known as La Tène, and it was prominent in France and Southern Britain in the Iron Age. Here are some other lovely examples of  La Tène metalwork
Tumblr media
This is a mid-late Iron Age shield boss, also from London. The design is often interpreted as birds.
Tumblr media
Late Iron Age Torc from Ipswitch. Look at the patterns on the ends, its almost hypnotic.  You know what does look like ‘Celtic’ knotwork? Anglo Saxon and Early Medieval art. Its about 5 centuries after the end of the Iron Age in England
Tumblr media
This is a page from the Lindisfarne Gospels, dated to c. 700 AD. Much more what the lay person thinks of as Celtic right? 
Tumblr media
This is an Anglo Saxon Brooch from the  Pentney Hoard (Norfolk) dated to 800-840 AD.  Look at the scrollwork on the edges. Classic knotwork pattern.  I’m not sure how the styles ended up being so mixed up in the vernacular, but I’m inclined to blame the Victorians, as well as the general confusion about the word ‘Celtic’. 
352 notes · View notes
loubatas-art · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
Ar C'had Sordet – The Bewitched Hare
[Image ID : a digital illustration of a white and gold hare standing near the ruins of a small wall, under the full moon, The larger ruins of a castle can be seen on the background. The hare has spiral patterns on its coat, inspired by Iron Age Celtic & Pictish art]
In Brittany, it is said that every castle in ruin has it own bewitched hare ("gad sordet" in Breton). Often either with a white coat, or larger than regular hares, these otherworldly creatures are actually the souls of feudal lords of the past, condemned to atone for their crimes in this form
Because they instilled fear in their subjects and servants when they were living, they became the most cowardly creature after they passed. Because they mistreated their subjects during their lifetime, in death they have to be hunted by their former victims. While the bullets pass through them without leaving a single drop of blood, the pain they experience is the same as if they were actually killed Their punishment ends only when the Bewitched Hare have died as many times as they mistreated their people
source : La légende de la Mort en Bretagne by Breton author & folklorist Anatol ar Braz
10 notes · View notes
fantasyvisions · 6 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
35 notes · View notes
forfeda-project · 5 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
A quick Kells-style Cú Chulainn in honor of Pride Month!
From his relationship with his foster brother Ferdiad, to his often-remarked-upon short stature and beardlessness, to his exemption from Macha's curse on the men of Ulster, the legendary hero Cú Chulainn is one of the few characters in Irish myth who easily lends himself to a queer reading - in more ways than one!
Mí Bród sona daoibh!
218 notes · View notes
evelyn-d-art · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
hey, would you look at that! I finally made a redbubble!
I have some of my favorite pieces of fanart listed, as well as some original art! Please consider checking it out!
34 notes · View notes
olyademidova · 8 months ago
Text
"The horned one" My new watercolor painting
Tumblr media
Original watercolor painting is on sale here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/975442434/cernunnos-with-deer-head-watercolor
"Cernunnos was the Gaelic god of beasts and wild places. Often called the Horned One, Cernunnos was a mediator of man and nature, able to tame predator and prey so they might lie down together. He remains a mysterious deity, as his original mythos has been lost to history.
Though Cernunnos himself appeared primarily in Ancient Gaul, similar characters have been found around the world, including in other Celtic regions.
Etymology
Cernunnos was an ancient Gaelic word meaning “horned” or “horned one.” The name shares its etymology with similar words across the Celtic world, including several Gallo-Roman cognates. The use of cern for “horned” was common in Indo-European languages, such as the Greek corn (the word unicorn, referring to the one-horned horse-like creature) and several Latin taxonomic terms for antlered animals.
In contemporary scholarship, Cernunnos has become a name used for other Celtic horned gods whose names have been lost to history. There is little evidence to suggest that the name Cernunnos was used outside of Gaul. Nevertheless, academic and religious scholars alike have used the name as a kind of catch-all for Celtic horned gods, as well as horned deities as far afield as India.
Other titles have been added to Cernunnos over time—often by modern neopagans—such as “Lord of the Wilds” or “God of Wild Places.” Such titles have no historical basis, but have come into popular usage with the rise of neopagan traditions.
Attributes
Little is known of Cernunnos, for almost nothing was written about him. He was a god of wild places, and often appeared as a bearded man with antlers. Some scholars believed his name and characteristics originally belonged to a number of horned gods that were then mixed together. Others have suggested Cernunnos’ traits were taken from Greco-Roman deities of similar appearance. In any case, it is best to remember that these gods were not necessarily the same entity, but instead emerged from similar cultural origins.
Cernunnos was a god of the wild who ruled over pristine nature and uncivilized ways. Animals were his subjects, and free-growing fruits and vegetable his bounty. Classical depictions of the deity included gatherings of animals such as elk, wolves, snakes, and aurochs. Such gatherings were possible thanks to Cernunnos’ abillity to bring natural enemies into peaceful communion with one another. This ability may have cast Cernunnos as a protector and provider amongst rural tribes and hunters.
Similarly, Cernunnos may have been a fertility god or god of life. In some classical societies, the natural world was the origin of all life. Under this schema, the god of the wilds would also have served as a god of life, creation, and fertility.
Cernunnos, the Horned God of neopagan traditions, is lord of both life and death; he grows old as the year progresses before being reborn and starting the cycle anew. He exists in tandem with the divine feminine, the Goddess, who is at once both mother and lover; in many traditions, his power stems from her. Note that Cernunnos neopagan attributes do not necessarily reflect his pre-Christian characteristics.
Mythology
Cernunnos was a particularly mysterious deity. His name appeared only once in historical sources, and none of his tales have survived from antiquity. Modern scholars and neopagans have nevertheless attributed a number of tales to the horned god.
Historical Cernunnos
The name Cernunnos has appeared only once—on the Pillar of the Boatman. Carved in Paris sometime during the 1st century CE, the pillar depicted a number of Roman and Gaelic gods, Cernunnos among them. In this depiction, Cernunnos’ torcs hung around his antlers, rather than his neck or hands. While it is unknown which tribes might have worshipped Cernunnos, it is clear that horned gods were commonly worshipped throughout the Celtic world.
The most famous image of Cernunnos—which may not depict him at all—was found on the Danish Gundestrup Cauldron. Dating back to the 1st century BCE, the cauldron was believed to have originated near Greece (likely in Gaul or Thrace), due to the art style and metallurgic practices required to create it. The horned god depicted on the cauldron bore similarities to those seen on Celtic stones, statues, and books during the early Christian period."
Source: https://mythopedia.com/celtic-mythology/gods/cernunnos/
162 notes · View notes
tumbldraig · 2 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Found myself some new toys and had to try them out immediately. While that beast from the Book of Kells appears funnily shocked by the fact that it is devouring its own tail, it was nevertheless a patient victim for colourshading. I like my new pens. 
11 notes · View notes
carenmorys · a year ago
Photo
Tumblr media
‘Awen’
Watercolour on 100% Cotton Paper.
Please message me for sales enquires.
https://facebook.com/carenmorys/
210 notes · View notes
stairnaheireann · 7 months ago
Text
The Turoe Stone
The Turoe Stone sculpture is a masterpiece of Irish Iron Age art and normally stands in the village of Bullaun near Loughrea, Co Galway. It had been moved in the 1850s from its original location near the Rath of Feerwore, an Iron Age ring-fort structure, at nearby Kiltullagh. The stone is currently off site and in the hands of the Office of Public Works for essential remedial work and unavailable…
Tumblr media
View On WordPress
20 notes · View notes