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#charles frederick worth
fripperiesandfobs · a month ago
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Russian court dress by Worth ca. 1888
From Cora Ginsburg (auctioned 2005, now in the collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art)
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history-of-fashion · 2 months ago
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ab. 1872 Afternoon dress by Charles Frederick Worth (House of Worth)
silk, mother-of-pearl, metal
(Metropolitan Museum of Art)
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• Walking suit.
Design House: House of Worth (French, 1858–1956); Designer: Charles Frederick Worth (French (born England), Bourne 1825–1895 Paris)
Date: ca. 1889
Medium: Silk
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jeannepompadour · 4 months ago
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Fancy dress costume designs created by Jules Helleu, possibly for Charles Frederick Worth, 1860s
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dailyhistoryposts · 2 months ago
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Charles Frederick Worth
The Father of Fashion, the Head of the House of Worth.
Charles Frederick Worth (1825-1895) was an English fashion designer, generally considered to be the first fashion designer (by modern definitions) in the world.
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Worth was born to a poor family in a small market town in England. His father abandoned his mother, Worth, and his four siblings (only one other of which survived til adulthood)--after draining all their money. Worth began working at age 11 in a printer's shop, but after only a year he moved to London to begin his apprenticeship in a department store. Before he even turned 20, he was working at a leading British textile store.
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[a fancy dress constume]
At the age of 21, Worth moved to Paris. Though he spoke absolutely no French at the time, he quickly became a sales assistant at a fabric firm that sold expensive silks and cashmeres to high society, including the dressmakers at the Parisian court.
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[an evening dress]
Worth began sewing dresses--first simple, but eventually gained enough success and popular to open a dress department. His dresses became famous for their beauty and craftsmanship, and were displayed in The Great Exhibition of 1851 in London and the Exposition Universelle of 1855 in Paris.
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[a peacock dress]
He quickly found success making ball dresses for the princesses of Europe, but in 1860, he became the favored dressmaker for Empress Eugénie of the French Empire. She ordered 250 dresses from Worth for the opening of the Suez Canal in Egypt.
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[an evening dress]
His dresses became widely known and recognizable--one could tell a Worth dress just by looking at it. He also changed the social dynamics--rather than dressmakers doing in-home fittings, his salon became a social hub of the wealthy and well-connected. Worth also, famously, outright told his clients (noblewomen, mainly) if he thought their fashion choices were ugly.
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[an evening dress]
His fashion house has over 1,200 staff at its peak sewing dresses, mixing hand sewing and machine sewing for custom orders and showcases. He had two major innovations: he narrowed the silhouette of the crinoline--then large enough to be a physical hindrance to women--and he invented a walking skirt with a hemline at ankle length. The scandal!
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[a walking dress]
He died at age 69 in Paris of pneumonia. More than just a dressmaker, he completely changed the marketing and selling of dresses in the fashion industry. He, unique for his time, viewed fashion as an art foremost, creating dresses that were uniquely his. He was the first designer to put labels in his clothes.
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[an evening dress]
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alwaysalwaysalwaysthesea · 5 months ago
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Dress by House of Worth made of “Tulipes Hollandaises” silk textile designed by A. M. Gourd & Cie and manufactured by Morel, Poeckès & Paumlin, 1889.
(source: Metropolitan Museum of Art)
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gaysquaredwrites · 11 months ago
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Mid/Plus-Size Worth Gowns
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Dinner Dress, 1890-95
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Dinner Dress, 1880-90
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Dress with day and evening bodices, 1864-67
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Afternoon dress, 1872
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Ballgown, 1872
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Afternoon dress, 1872
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Evening Dress, 1888
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Tea Gown, 1910
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mysewingadventures · 8 months ago
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Worth Gowns
I feel like every single dress historian has tackled the topic of Worth gowns at some point so let me be no different. I keep seeing so many people wanting to make one themselves and looking to find their Worth gown that I wondered, maybe I can do that too.
Obviously, I’m by far not as skilled as all of these other amazing, talented artists (I mean, just look at Cathy Hay recreating the Peacock Dress) but maybe once I’ve made some Victorian gowns I’ll get the hang of it and maybe, I’ll feel like I can do it.
But today I sat down and thought I could make it a mission to look at photos of as many Worth gowns as I could possibly find and maybe find one for a future project.
But first, if you’ve never heard of Charles Frederick Worth, he’s basically the father of haute couture and the first fashion designer in the modern sense. He founded the House of Worth which existed from 1858 up until 1956. Worth gowns have the name Worth stitched onto the inside of the waistband either like this
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or like this
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For now, I just looked through the collection of the Met Museum but there are still sooo many more gowns to find.
So now I would like to present to you some of my favorites and/or ones that I thought were particularly interesting.
First of all, we have this beautiful early 1860s lavender dress with two bodices, one for day wear and one for evening wear.
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When I hear people talk about Worth gowns it’s mostly about 1880s or 90s dresses so when I found out that the House of Worth was already founded in 1958 I was very surprised because I didn’t actually know that. That’s why I wanted to include this dress, because early Worth gowns are not something that are mentioned a lot.
Next up there’s this seemingly ordinary dress.
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It looks so ordinary I would’ve never guessed it was made by Worth! But then again, it’s a morning dress so it’s sort of understandable why it’s not as extravagant as the rest.
Then I stumbled across this interesting, very experimental-looking dress.
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It’s almost as if an 18th century Polonaise and an 1880s dress had a baby.
Now, let’s get to my favorites! It’s really hard to decide which one’s the most beautiful one so I’m going to mention them in no particular order.
There’s this champagne-colored beauty with actual pearl tassles!
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And once you take a closer look you’ll see that there’s pearl trimming around the neckline and it actually looks like pearl lace. Incredible.
Then there’s this gorgeous 1902 floral gown.
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The way the flowers separate from the rest and are used as appliqué on the lace is just stunning.
Next up, we have this beauty.
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I don’t really know what it is that I love about this gown, it’s everything. The way the colors aren’t the same but match perfectly, the gold patterns, the train...
And finally, we have... I think if I had to choose one this would be it, so maybe I did end up putting them in order of my preference. Oh well.
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This is an 1882 evening dress, but I’m just gonna say... imagine this as your wedding dress. Not that I’d want to get married in it, but just... a hypothetical wedding with this hypothetical wedding dress, it’s giving me just enough fae vibe to feel like you’re in a Disney movie but not too much to make it too tacky.
So this concludes today’s search for The Perfect Worth Gown. If I had to recreate one, I’d probably choose the mermaid one, the green and blue one, just because I feel like that’s the most doable one of them. But ironically enough I picked almost only 1880s dresses, which is my least favorite Victorian fashion decade. Guess I might get myself a bustle after all to recreate a Worth gown.
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montmartre-parapluie · 2 months ago
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Another Shadow and Bone Costume Post...
@orlissa, you really shouldn't GIVE me the chance to assign gowns to characters like this. I get far too into it... @vesperass-anuna, @pia-bartolini, @jomiddlemarch, give me your dress headcanons too!
Right, where to begin!
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1) Woman’s Dress,” c. 1866–68, designed by Charles Frederick Worth, label Worth & Bobergh, Paris - You nailed it! This is DEFINITELY Alina.
There's a subtlety about that gold/cream that says Sun Summoner, but - in a gentle, refined way. (ALSO - although Alina may not have had a "proper" wedding ceremony in Terrible Beautiful Unsaid Things, I have a sneaking suspicion Aleksander apologises to her by having a gorgeous 'wedding anniversary' celebration ball the next year, where she wears this...)
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2)“Woman’s Dress,” c. 1866–68, designed by Charles Frederick Worth, made by Worth & Bobergh, Paris
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Genya. This is 100% GENYA. There's a cleanness, elegance and lack of fuss about this that feels very Miss Safin. She's avoiding the 'dressed like a wedding cake look' the Court demands. Plus tell me that colour wouldn't look AMAZING with her red hair. She would look like a Fae Queen, and David would 100% be heart-eying her behind her back.
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3)“Woman’s Evening Dress,” c. 1886–87, designed by Charles Frederick Worth
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I don't know what is is about this one - the perky bow on the front? that dash of deep crimson (Heartrender?) red? the gorgeous embroidered flowers with that yellow train?
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But this feels very "Fancy Nina" to me - possibly acting as a Grisha Ambassador to Kerch whilst spying, or something. It's got her irrepressible nature as well as her skills and subtlety there. (AND the bow on the bodice is at just the right height to ahem, "distract" Matthias...
4)“Woman’s Day Dress,” c. 1878–80, designed by Charles Frederick Worth
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Another Alina for me, I'm afraid! The colours with the golden flowers and that luxurious black silk are SO 'Darkling Sun Summoner Kefta' it hurts. I love it deeply.
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(and... you just KNOW Alina is probably wearing THIS corset beneath it, which... ahem, Aleksander probably makes this face when thinking about...)
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(Sorry for the unexpected Darklina thirst there, guys - oh who am I kidding, I apologise for nothing)
“Woman’s Evening Dress,” c. 1886–87, designed by Charles Frederick Worth
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This feels like "Deliberatively Provocative Nina", to me. The pink, the tantalising low neckline, the outrageous lace and embroidered silk and ribbons? This is all worn to provoke an uneasy 'Fjerdan Women are modest and would never dress so...so shamelessly' lecture from Mathias that you just KNOW is going to end up in a heated make-out session - with the offending dress on the floor.
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fripperiesandfobs · 10 months ago
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Worth reception dress ca. 1890-95
From Enchères Sadde via Interencheres
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history-of-fashion · 6 months ago
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1893 Evening dress by Charles Frederick Worth
silk satin, crêpe and velvet, decorated with metal threads, rhinestones and floral embroidery
(Chicago History Museum)
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• Black velvet cape.
Designer: Charles Frederick Worth
Date: 1890-1899
Medium: Velvet
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saisew · 7 months ago
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Franz Xaver Winterhalter, Empress Elisabeth of Austria (1865) and Ernst Marischka, Sissi (1955)
Empress Sissi wears an evening gown believed to be made by Charles Frederick Worth, the most prolific dress maker of the late 19th century. The dress was made of white satin and tulle. It’s covered with silver foiled stars underneath the top layer of tulle, it’s also has gemstones and pearls throughout. The silhouette features an off the shoulder neckline, puffed sleeves, fitted bodice, and full skirt, which were extremely popular in the late Victorian era. Sissi had very long hair that was braided to create her famous hairstyle and was adorned with diamond edelweiss pins.
The 1955 film, Sissi, directed by Ernst Marischka featured costumes by Gerdago. Empress Sissi’s iconic dress was recreated well for this film. My only complaint is that the stars are on the top layer of the skirt, aren’t as plentiful as they were on the original, and are gold instead of silver. These details were most likely changed so they would show up better on film but makes it look less opulent to me. I much prefer the real life gown.
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vint-agge-xx · a year ago
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Dress: Court Dress designed for the Imperial Russian Court
Fabric: Green Velvet and Silver Moirè
Designer: Charles Frederick Worth
Date: 1888’
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costumeloverz71 · a month ago
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Evening ensemble c.1887 - Charles Frederick Worth
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lilyabsinthe · 2 months ago
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The Ensemble Dress
One interesting aspect of Charles Worth’s designs was what was called the “Ensemble Dress.” This was a dress that had two bodices, typically one for day wear and one for evening wear so one could have a nice semi-formal dress for calling on friends, going into town, or attending some sort of day function. At the same time, with a change in bodices, one would have also be properly dressed for an…
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baronmaymystery · 6 months ago
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Fashion and Historical Progression (Part 2)
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Charles Frederick Worth (1825-1895) grew up in misery in England. First, as one of five children, he was one of just two to survive to adulthood, with the diseases of the era (this was before germ theory), and his “dissolute” father abandoned the family to poverty when Worth was 11.
The ambition that created fashion as we know it- something that any person can, at least in theory, purchase because of mass production- grew from Worth’s difficult early life.
Moving to Paris, France in 1846, speaking no French and with five pounds as his total financial resources, but as an expert tailor, Worth soon not only produced large orders of clothing, but innovated in designs in key ways: He abandoned the crinoline, a type of petticoat that was so large and stiff that it made going through ordinary doorways difficult, in favor of the “princess dress”, seen here:
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Worth’s other common sense reform was to shorten hemlines to ankle length. 
Prior to Worth, fashion was either impractical for anything but a painting (like the French kings) or “anti-fashion” in the French Revolutionary spirit. Worth’s look was decorative, yet practical (and hence marketable), starting fashion as an industry. In this “making rags” to riches tale, the once-poor Worth became ridiculously wealthy, leading others to take notice of fashion as a business.
There are two primary tools of fashion marketing. One is fashion photography, which was not, of course, possible prior to the invention of photography in the 1820′s, or before subsequent improvements in camera technology, necessitating less time in front of the camera by a model, made fashion photography as a specialty possible, starting with Edward Steichen in 1911:
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Steichen’s photos were the first intended specifically to promote the sale of fashionable clothing, specifically that designed by Paul Poiret. Steichen took the photographs on something of a dare, just to prove that photography could be effective for this purpose.
Likewise inseparable from today’s fashion is the fashion show, which was fueled by American money as early as 1903, and occurred regularly in New York City and Philadelphia by 1910. These models were in Toronto, Canada in 1910, close to the American Northeast:
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But in the early days, modeling was just something done to make ends meet as an aspiring actor, until Lisa Fonssagrives changed all of that in the 1940′s. The Swedish Fonssagrives, who once facetiously described herself as a “good clothes hanger”, was the first to make a comfortable living just by modeling clothing, because others wanted to wear it because she had- and not because of fame unrelated to modeling (e.g. being an actor or a noblewoman)- solely because Fonssagrives sold the clothing by wearing it:
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That’s Lisa Fonssagrives in Vogue in 1949.
While the French kings of old loved to strut about in fancy clothing, this new type of fashion sold to the middle class focused almost exclusively on women, with the modern male model not appearing until...
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Jeff Aquilon, seen here in a 1981 photograph, became the first male supermodel.
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