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christowitch · 2 days ago
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New favorite spell jars.
Step one: Drink the apple juice
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killtheklan · 2 days ago
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Y’all want biblical wives but y’all aren’t biblical men. Y’all are NOT the men the good Lord was describing. Y’all are not the honest, faithful, loving, humble men the Heavenly Father was referring to when he said that women were created for the glory of man. If women are meant to adorn your life, your life must be worth adorning in the first place.
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faithwithserena · a day ago
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Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) "Bust of the Savior" (1680) Marble Baroque Located in the San Sebastiano fuori le mura, Rome, Italy This was the last sculpture created by Bernini who died from the after-effects of a stroke at the age of 81 years. He left the sculpture in his will to his friend and patron, queen Christina of Sweden.
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walkswithmyfather · a day ago
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a-witch-named-crow · a day ago
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I started this post about a month ago, but I've seen the subject come up twice in the last 24 hours so I figured it might be time to finish writing it.
A recent debate (which I may or may not have accidentally started) about just what people mean when they say "pagan" and why it might piss some people off to have their religion referred to as such has inspired me to write a bit on the subject.
Let's start with some etymology! Wooo!
pagan (n.)
c. 1400, perhaps mid-14c., "person of non-Christian or non-Jewish faith," from Late Latin paganus "pagan," in classical Latin "villager, rustic; civilian, non-combatant" noun use of adjective meaning "of the country, of a village," from pagus "country people; province, rural district," originally "district limited by markers," thus related to pangere "to fix, fasten," from PIE root *pag- "to fasten." As an adjective from early 15c.
The religious sense often was said in 19c. [e.g. Trench] to derive from conservative rural adherence to the old gods after the Christianization of Roman towns and cities; but the Latin word in this sense predates that period in Church history, and it is more likely derived from the use of paganus in Roman military jargon for "civilian, incompetent soldier," which Christians (Tertullian, c. 202; Augustine) picked up with the military imagery of the early Church (such as milites "soldier of Christ," etc.).
The English word was used later in a narrower sense of "one not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim." As "person of heathenish character or habits," by 1841. Applied to modern pantheists and nature-worshippers from 1908.
Pagan and heathen are primarily the same in meaning; but pagan is sometimes distinctively applied to those nations that, although worshiping false gods, are more cultivated, as the Greeks and Romans, and heathen to uncivilized idolaters, as the tribes of Africa. A Mohammedan is not counted a pagan much less a heathen. [Century Dictionary, 1897]
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TLDR: Pagan in the current sense of the word began with Christians referring to people who hadn't been converted to Christianity, and was more recently expanded to mean anyone who isn't Christian, Jewish, or Muslim.
This is a specifically Christian worldview, which establishes a false dichotomy of essentially "Christian or nah". It reduces the rest of the world's religions and cultures down to "other".
While it's fine if you want to "reclaim" this word by self-identifying as pagan (or heathen), when you start applying it to others against their will it becomes kind of a shitty thing to do.
But if that's literally what the word means, why can't I use it that way?
If a slur literally refers to an oppressed group of people, does that mean it's fine to go around calling those people slurs? The answer is "no". Knowing what a word means and being a decent person aren't always the same thing.
It's also important to consider that many of us have grown up in a Christian society, whether we were raised as Christians or not, which means that we often view things through a Christian lens in many ways that we're not even aware of. This kind of dichotomy is an example of that. It's also an example of the sort colonizer mentality that often comes with living in a Christian society.
Obligatory disclaimer that I'm not saying that all Christians are bad or that it's an inherently bad religion -- just that there is a long history of Christians colonizing much of the world and using religious institutions to try to erase other cultures.
In general, it's almost* always a good idea to listen to others when it comes to matters of their own identity, instead of placing your own labels on them. Chances are they know better than you do.
*fascists are notoriously bad at properly labeling themselves, so you have to keep an eye out for the signs
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heresylog · 2 days ago
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Hey odd question if like a vampire confessed to a priest does the priest still have to follow all the restriction and promises they would with anybody else?
Uh, yes! That’s discrimination.
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cheerfullycatholic · a day ago
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instagram
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herpinkbible · 2 days ago
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My Monthly Meditation for May 🧡
If you’re not sure on how to use these meditations - I try to read my meditation every morning, afternoon, and night! Repeat it, repeat it, repeat it! Know the verse so you can combat it when negative thoughts come or you’re experiencing adversity in your life! Combat lies of the enemy with the truth! The word of God is beyond powerful! It is sharper than a double edged sword.
God bless 🧡
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heartsings77 · 2 days ago
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Psalm 128:1-4 NLT 1 How joyful are those who fear the Lord—    all who follow his ways! 2 You will enjoy the fruit of your labor.    How joyful and prosperous you will be! 3 Your wife will be like a fruitful grapevine,    flourishing within your home. Your children will be like vigorous young olive trees    as they sit around your table. 4 That is the Lord’s blessing    for those who fear him.
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gemsofgreece · a day ago
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Blue dome in a church in Kavala, Macedonia, Greece.
Artist ↬ @pan0s on Instagram.
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Christians are so funny.
They won’t let their children know about gay people, but they tell them graphic stories of a man getting crucified and brutally tortured to death.
Like, hello? 
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chenaixo · 2 days ago
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Psalm 63:3
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gospel-art-project · 2 days ago
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fuckyeahreligionpigeon · 2 days ago
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According to a recent Gallup poll, only 12 percent of Americans believe that life on earth has evolved through a natural process, without the interference of a deity. Thirty one percent believe that evolution has been "guided by God." If our worldview were put to a vote, notions of "intelligent design" would defeat the science of biology by nearly three to one. This is troubling, as nature offers no compelling evidence for an intelligent designer and countless examples of unintelligent design. But the current controversy over "intelligent design" should not blind us to the true scope of our religious bewilderment at the dawn of the twenty first century. The same Gallup poll revealed that 53 percent of Americans are actually creationists.
This means that despite a full century of scientific insights attesting to the antiquity of life and the greater antiquity of the earth, more than half of our neighbors believe that the entire cosmos was created six thousand years ago. This is, incidentally, about a thousand years after the Sumerians invented glue. Those with the power to elect our presidents and congressmen - and many who themselves get elected—believe that dinosaurs lived two by two upon Noah's ark, that light from distant galaxies was created en route to the earth, and that the first members of our species were fashioned out of dirt and divine breath, in a garden with a talking snake, by the hand of an invisible God.
Among developed nations, America stands alone in these convictions. Our country now appears, as at no other time in her history, like a lumbering, bellicose, dimwitted giant. Anyone who cares about the fate of civilization would do well to recognize that the combination of great power and great stupidity is simply terrifying, even to one's friends. The truth, however, is that many of us may not care about the fate of civilization. Forty four percent of the American population is convinced that Jesus will return to judge the living and the dead sometime in the next fifty years. According to the most common interpretation of biblical prophecy, Jesus will return only after things have gone horribly awry here on earth. It is, therefore, not an exaggeration to say that if the city of New York were suddenly replaced by a ball of fire, some significant percentage of the American population would see a silver lining in the subsequent mushroom cloud, as it would suggest to them that the best thing that is ever going to happen was about to happen: the return of Christ. It should be blindingly obvious that beliefs of this sort will do little to help us create a durable future for ourselves—socially, economically, environmentally, or geopolitically. Imagine the consequences if any significant component of the U.S. government actually believed that the world was about to end and that its ending would be glorious. The fact that nearly half of the American population apparently believes this, purely on the basis of religious dogma, should be considered a moral and intellectual emergency.
-- Sam Harris, “Letter to a Christian Nation” (2006)
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heresylog · 8 hours ago
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When Mary had Jesus it was an immaculate conception. And because Jesus was born to a woman without original sin, Mary was also an immaculate conception. So when Mary was pregnant it was an immaculate inception.
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deathsexy6 · 2 days ago
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BE TEMPTED HERE CHILDREN OF CHRIST! FOR I AM THE WOLF AND I HAVE CLAIMED MANY FROM HIS FLOCK! KNOW THE LEFTHAND PATH AND YOU SHALL KNOW TRUTH, POWER, AND PLEASURE! CUM! BE FREE!
HAIL SATAN!
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coruscanttojerusalem · 22 hours ago
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Historically literate Protestants, when do you think the Catholic Church started? Like when do you think the Catholic Church emerged from the community Christ founded. I mean this not as a "gotcha" but to understand your worldview a bit. Where I grew up is a quite secular area and haven't had the courage to have this awkward conversation with my colleagues. I understand people who just grew up hearing what their pastors said, but I want to know what Protestants who have really thought about history think.
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