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#classicfilmcentral
stannisbaratheon · 2 days ago
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Did he lie to you? Oh, but you must be used to that by now. Men always lie. Personally, I have no use for them except for Christian. But then he's different.
Sharon Tate and David Hemmings — Odile and Christian de Caray in Eye of the Devil (1966)
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marciabrady · 2 days ago
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ESTELLE WINWOOD and LESLIE CARON depicting the power of words and names decades before the live action remake in a scene written by HELEN DEUTSCH in THE GLASS SLIPPER (1955)
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catherine-tramells · 2 days ago
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I'm dreaming of a white Christmas Just like the ones I used to know Where the treetops glisten and children listen To hear sleigh bells in the snow
White Christmas (1954) dir. Michael Curtiz
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divineandmajesticinone · 4 months ago
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WONDER BAR (1934) | dir. Lloyd Bacon
“The other [scene that stands out above the rest] involved a handsome man, asking a dancing couple if he could cut in. The female partner, expecting his attention, agrees, only to see him dance with her male partner. Jolson then flaps his wrist and says, “Boys will be boys. Woo!”. This scene almost caused the Production Code to reject the film, and was featured in the opening scenes of the documentary film The Celluloid Closet (1996).”
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deforest · 3 months ago
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FAYARD & HAROLD NICHOLAS (The Nicholas Brothers) in STORMY WEATHER — 1943, dir. Andrew L. Stone Fred Astaire told the brothers that the "Jumpin' Jive" number in Stormy Weather was the greatest number he had ever seen on film. He would have been more impressed had he known, Harold admits, that "when it was time to do the jumps over each other's heads into splits in the routine, we never rehearsed it." Fayard adds: "It came nice and easy. Nick Castle [the choreographer] said not to rehearse it, that we knew what to do, so we did it like a rehearsal. And in one take!" — Brotherhood in Rhythm: The Jazz Tap Dancing of the Nicholas Brothers by Constance Valis Hill
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sadrobots · a month ago
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Cary Grant in Bringing Up Baby (1938) dir. Howard Hawks  
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marciabrady · a month ago
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LESLIE CARON viewed the character of Cinderella as a rebel and was particularly inspired by Marlon Brando’s performance as Terry Malloy. She designed this cropped haircut herself, to the chagrin of MGM executives, and came up with the backstory of why her character’s hair was this short and seemingly cut by kitchen shears in THE GLASS SLIPPER (1955)
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deforest · 2 months ago
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GENE TIERNEY in LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN (1945) — dir. John M. Stahl
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