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the-wolf-and-moon · a day ago
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NGC 224, Andromeda Our Sister
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spacewonder19 · a day ago
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the dark, starry gap “SUPERBUBBLE” in the nebula N44 
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fleur-aesthetic · 20 hours ago
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instagram | brambleandbloomfloral
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capturingthecosmos · 2 days ago
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A Large Tsunami Shock Wave on the Sun via NASA https://ift.tt/Q1VKYzA
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through-hubbles-eyes · 2 days ago
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𝑳𝒂𝒓𝒈𝒆 𝑴𝒂𝒈𝒆𝒍𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒊𝒄 𝑪𝒍𝒐𝒖𝒅
The brightly glowing plumes seen in this image are reminiscent of an underwater scene, with turquoise-tinted currents and nebulous strands reaching out into the surroundings.
However, this is no ocean. This image actually shows part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small nearby galaxy that orbits our galaxy, the Milky Way, and appears as a blurred blob in our skies. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has peeked many times into this galaxy, releasing stunning images of the whirling clouds of gas and sparkling stars (opo9944a, heic1301, potw1408a).
This image shows part of the Tarantula Nebula's outskirts. This famously beautiful nebula, located within the LMC, is a frequent target for Hubble (heic1206, heic1402).
In most images of the LMC the colour is completely different to that seen here. This is because, in this new image, a different set of filters was used. The customary R filter, which selects the red light, was replaced by a filter letting through the near-infrared light. In traditional images, the hydrogen gas appears pink because it shines most brightly in the red. Here however, other less prominent emission lines dominate in the blue and green filters.
This data is part of the Archival Pure Parallel Project (APPP), a project that gathered together and processed over 1000 images taken using Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, obtained in parallel with other Hubble instruments. Much of the data in the project could be used to study a wide range of astronomical topics, including gravitational lensing and cosmic shear, exploring distant star-forming galaxies, supplementing observations in other wavelength ranges with optical data, and examining star populations from stellar heavyweights all the way down to solar-mass stars.
A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Josh Barrington.
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euphorictruths · 11 hours ago
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BHR 71; April 17th, 2007
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creativespacetime · 15 hours ago
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GiF by Blunt - Science
All rights reserved.
@ms-mazariegos @generalinternetyouth @amiinatta @staff @tagtraumprinzessin @y-64 @explor3 @explore-blog @nature @life @creature-features @evolutionists @timelightbox @existences @creativity
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spacewonder19 · 20 hours ago
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Young star punching through dust cloud with a gas jet 
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aqua-regia009 · 8 months ago
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Art Touched by Clayshaper
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capturingthecosmos · a day ago
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The Once and Future Stars of Andromeda via NASA https://ift.tt/cMZfauH
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megaceros · 4 months ago
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Quasicosmo (fursona 006)
I think this is the creature you see just before waking up
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through-hubbles-eyes · 19 hours ago
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𝑵𝑮𝑪 7331
This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (The Winged Horse). Facing us partially edge-on, the galaxy showcases it’s beautiful arms which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region.
Astronomers took this image using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star — a supernova — which can still be faintly seen as a tiny red dot near the galaxy’s central yellow core. Named SN2014C, it rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little Hydrogen to one that is Hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars.
NGC 7331 is similar in size, shape, and mass to the Milky Way. It also has a comparable star formation rate, hosts a similar number of stars, has a central supermassive black hole and comparable spiral arms. The primary difference between our galaxies is that NGC 7331 is an unbarred spiral galaxy — it lacks a “bar” of stars, gas and dust cutting through its nucleus, as we see in the Milky Way. Its central bulge also displays a quirky and unusual rotation pattern, spinning in the opposite direction to the galactic disc itself.
By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behaviour and evolution as a whole.
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pangeen · 4 months ago
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Which one is your favorite?
Photo credit: NASA
via voyager_of_cosmos
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vangoghcore · 22 days ago
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by NASA
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iloveyoucas · 3 months ago
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my all time favourite collection of images is earth from other planets
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before-life · a month ago
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Moon with stars by m7ammad
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the-wolf-and-moon · a day ago
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NGC 2264, Fox
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