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#11

After you test positive, they’ll speir onybody ye hiv bin close te, te bide awa fae ithir folks fer twa wiks.

(If you test positive, the government will trace your close contacts and advise them to isolate for 14 days, with support.)

#12

Coming oot of lockdown masks hand-washing, pittin on fizog clooties and biding awa fae folk even mair important.

(The easing of lockdown makes hand washing, face coverings and social distancing even more important.)

#13

Bide at hame as much as you can, as the virus is still gaan aboot. Ca canny aabody.

(Stay at home as much as possible as the virus is still out there. Exercise care and caution and stick to the rules.)

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Telesterion

Eleusis, Attica, Greece

5th century BCE - 170 CE

The Telesterion (“Initiation Hall” from Gr. τελείω, “to complete, to fulfill, to consecrate, to initiate”) was a great hall and sanctuary in Eleusis, one of the primary centers of the Eleusinian Mysteries. Devoted to Demeter and Persephone, these initiation ceremonies were the most sacred and ancient of all the religious rites celebrated in Greece.

The Athenians used several calendars, each for different purposes. The festival of Eleusinia was celebrated each year in Eleusis and Athens for nine days from the 15th to the 23rd of the month of Boedromion (in September or October of the Gregorian calendar); because the festival calendar had 12 lunar months, the celebrations were not strictly calibrated to a year of 365 days. During the festival, Athens was crowded with visitors. As the climax of the ceremonies at Eleusis, the initiates entered the Telesterion where they were shown the sacred relics of Demeter and the priestesses revealed their visions of the holy night (probably a fire that represented the possibility of life after death). This was the most secretive part of the Mysteries and those who had been initiated were forbidden to ever speak of the events that took place in the Telesterion. If still in use by the 4th-century, the temple would have been closed during the persecution of pagans in the late Roman Empire, when all non-Christian sanctuaries was ordered closed by law initiated by the Christian emperors.

The site of the Telesterion is believed to have had some temple since the 7th century BCE, or the time of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter one of 33 Homeric Hymns (650-550 BCE); the Telesterion had ten different building phases. It was destroyed by the Persians after the Battle of Thermopylae, when the Athenians withdrew to Salamis in 480 BCE and all of Boeotia and Attica fell to the Persian army, who captured and burnt Athens. After the defeat of the Persians, the Telesterion was rebuilt some time later by Pericles. At some point in the 5th century BCE, Iktinos, the great architect of the Parthenon, built the Telesterion big enough to hold thousands of people. In about 318 BCE, Philon added a portico with twelve Doric columns. In CE 170, during the rule of Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, an ancient tribe called the Costoboci launched an invasion of Roman territory south of the Danube, entering Thracia and ravaging the provinces of Macedonia and Achaea (Greece). The Costoboci reached as far south as Eleusis, where they destroyed the Telesterion. The emperor responded by despatching general Vehilius Gratus Iulianus to Greece with emergency reinforcements, who eventually defeated the Costoboci. Marcus Aurelius then had the Telesterion rebuilt. In 396 CE, the forces of Alaric the Visigoth invaded the Eastern Roman Empire and ravaged Attica, destroying the Telesterion, which was never to be rebuilt.

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Umm El Omad Cave (מערת אום אל עמד)

Jerusalem, Israel

1st century BCE   

The Umm El Omad Cave cave was used to bury a wealthy Jewish family from the Second Temple period, based on the design of the walls of the room and the cave opening, that mimic the magnificent construction of the Temple Mount walls from Herod’s period and Greek construction in general.The facade was distyle in-antis, with Doric Antae and Ionic columns supporting a Doric frieze crowned with a cornice. In the Byzantine period, the front room became a chapel (Christian prayer house).

Description of the cave
The Umm El Omad Cave was hewn into the rock. At its opening were two rock-cut Ionic pillars but today they do not exist. A courtyard was hewn on the southern side of the cave and its walls chiseled as ashlars with margin drafts. At the entrance to the cave was the first hall with all its sides designed as tiers, and its entrance was on the northern wall. Then there is another burial room, in the middle of which a bone pit, and on three of its sides five burial niches were carved. Some say the two adjacent niches in the eastern wall were used for the chapel. In the northern wall, the middle niche was turned into a door to another room, in the center of which a shallow pit was hewn with niches around it.

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El-Jouf Tomb (קבר אל-ג’וף)

Judea, Israel

1st century BCE\CE

A magnificent Jewish burial cave decorated in the style of Khirbet Kurkush, Deir ad-Derb and Umm al-Umad, which is at the height of the dirt road north of the road.

At the edge of the eulogy courtyard, stands the cave facade, decorated with a Doric entablature of richly decorated rosettes and unorthodox triglyphs ending in the frieze and not in the architrave. Columns were placed at the entrance to the cave. The cave has an outer room and an inner room, from which another room  containing recliners, niches and a bone pit was accessed.

El Jouf is large mound containing remains of Middle Bronze Age II, Hellenistic, Late Roman and Byzantine. To the east, a remnant of a wall, many of whose stones were incorporated into terraces and scattered around. At the summit, mostly robbed with heavy tools, relics of buildings, and the remains of a large public building on the west side from which also a stone-carved doorway survived. Many caves are scattered across the mound, some of which are branched. This cave appears to have been used as an underground oil mill.

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Synagogue of Meron

Meron, Galilee, Israel

1st century CE

The building was 27 m long and about 13.5 m wide and was carved into the mountain. The northern wall of the synagogue is hewn and it is evident that it reached the height of the building. The building’s foundation has holes as the foundation for the pillars pedestals which held the roof of the synagogue. The synagogue is aimed at Jerusalem, and is the longest found in the country of its kind so far. From all if its walls, mostly the southern wall survives, which had 3 openings: a central opening, with a cracked lintel, and another, which was restored. In the synagogue, the lintels and the cornices atop of them weren’t  decorated with reliefs. Zvi Ilan believes that this is the result of a trend not to over decorate the synagogue’s decoration and not an evidence of the economic situation of the local residents, who have invested heavily in the synagogue’s construction. The Holy Ark was probably near the main entrance, and no remains were found.

The establishment of the synagogue while investing a great deal in quarrying a building in a relatively large area indicates the great importance that the early residents of Meron gave to the synagogue.

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Greater Propylon

Eleusis, Attica, Greece

170 CE

The Greater Propylon was a monumnetal gateway into the sanctuary of Eleusis. It was probably built by Marcus Aurelius and although the face of the bust on the pediment is badly damaged, it is thought to be a portrait of the emperor. It was built on the same site as an earlier gate from the time of Kimon. It copied the central form of the Mnesiklean Propylaia in Athens.

although the face is badly damaged, it is thought to be a portrait of the emperor Marcus Aurelius who built the Greater Propylaea

It was a doric hexastyle amphiprostyle building approached by 6 steps on the east. Continuing from the east, an Ionic inner colonnade of 6 columns divided the building into 3 aisles. Beyond, was a cross wall pierced by 5 doorways. The central passage between the columns and through the doors was wider than the side passages.

Compare with original:  Mnesiklean Propylaia in Athens

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I have family from Aberdeen, where the local dialect is called Doric. The traditional greeting in Doric is “Hoo’s yer doos?” (how are your doves) to which the positive reponse is “awa’ peckin!” (always pecking). I thought you ought to know. 

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The classical Doric building is the most perfect, static orchestration of space…no line, no decoration which detracts from the form of the temple itself. Everything is pure, clear, comprehensible, yet with a function which is the fruit of experience.

from Der Mythus des zwangzigsten Jahrhunderts.

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The Dorians work in stone, it remains unpainted. Their figures are naked. Doric, that is skin, but skin moving over muscles, masculine flesh, the body. The body, tanned by the sun, oil, dust, the strigil and cold baths, used to fresh air, mature, beautifully toned. Every muscle, the knee-cap, the positioning of joints, dealt with, assimilated, integrated, the whole warlike, yet very choice.

Gottfried Benn from Doric world, an investigation into the relationship of art & power, 1934.

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Behind this silhouette of Greece, a pan-Hellenic mixture, stands the grey column without a base, the temple of hewn stone, stands the camp of men on the right bank of the Eurotas, it’s dark choirs -: the Doric world. Dorian’s love mountains, Apollo is their national god, Heracles their first king, Delphi the sacred place, they reject swaddling and bathe their children in wine.

Gottfried Benn from Dorische Welt: Eine Untersuchung über die Beziehung von Kunst und Macht, 1934.
[image: Apollo from a bronze original Greek sculpture attributed to Kalamis or Phidias
About 470 – 460 BC in Pentelic marble
2nd Cent. AD. Paris, Musée du Louvre]

devayana
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by Mary Munro

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Hotterin an oozin fae the Wells o’ Dee,
The river winds lang on her wey tae the Sea.
Ower Braeriach’s grim cliff, she loups tae the Glen,
Neath craggy, auld faces o’ harsh mountain bens.

Bubblin an chatterin in grey-granite rills,
Swalled wi the peat-burns fae shelterin hills.
Doon at the Linn, roarin thro’ the scoored gorge,
Then spreadin her fingers afore bonny Mar Lodge.

She hoves doon the Valley fae Braemar tae the Sea,
Past auld Scots pines an bonny, green lea.
Thro’ low-hingin laricks an fir-scented tang,
She gaithers her bairns, growin wider an strang.

The hert o’ the Valley, aye lo’ed by her ain,
The Dee cuts the land, like a life-bringin vein.
Fyles, roarin in spate or flowin sae calm,
The soon o’ her waaters aye like a balm.

The fowk o’ the Glen are bit here for a fyle,
Bit eternal, auld Dee flows on mile upon mile,
Teemin her bounty intae the muckle saat Sea,
Like a Mither, aye faithful, this bonny-bit Dee.

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