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#emma 1972
thebossofcute · a month ago
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Every Emma Woodhouse Ranked and Rated
With all my reviews of all the period-set adaptations now finished, I'm beginning my series in which I rate and rank each interpretation of all the principle characters, starting with our girl Emma!
Now I wanna be clear--I am not rating the actresses that played Emma. I am rating how the character was handled in general in each adaptation. The actresses are a factor, but they're not the sole factor, since the writer and director have as much, if not more, to do with how the character ends up in the finished product. So without futher ado, let's rank...
“Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her….
“The real evils indeed of Emma’s situation were the power of having rather too much of her own way, and a disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages that threatened alloy to her many enjoyments.”
NUMBER 5: 1972
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Portrayed by: Doran Godwin
Age at time of filming: 28
Clocking in as the oldest actress to play Austen’s famously TWENTY-ONE year old heroine (at the ripe age of 28), Doran Godwin also snags the coveted position as inhabiting the worst portrayal of the character (in my personal estimation) to date.
Just about everything about this interpretation of Emma Woodhouse is bad, from her seemingly automated recital of her lines to her all-too-intense, wide-eyed, hypnotic stare. The 1972 portrayal of Emma highlights all the character’s worst qualities while also failing to convincingly communicate her good qualities, such as her caring nature. The script is equally to blame for the awfulness of this interpretation, adding unnecessarily cruel and condescending lines, including one where she negs Harriet for being sad after Elton’s marriage, and then forces Harriet to come with her to meet the new Mrs. Elton, when Emma in the book did her best to shield Harriet from exactly that kind of situation.
Godwin couldn’t pass for 21 if her life had depended on it, and the worst part is that the script actually states Emma’s age, so she seems like a bit of a crazy spinster, preying on the naïve Harriet. Whether it’s her intent to bathe in Harriet’s blood to keep herself young, or to bake her into a pie is up for debate.
Rating: 1/5 Half-finished portraits
NUMBER 4: 2020
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Portrayed by: Anya Taylor Joy
Age at time of filming: 23
I thought long and hard about this. This movie is a modern period drama phenomenon. It’s gotten so many people into Jane Austen and satisfied long-time Austen fans by giving them an interpretation they never dared hope to see. It’s a gorgeous film.
But I don’t like this interpretation of Emma Woodhouse. Though Anya Taylor Joy is one of the youngest actresses to play Emma (only two years older than the character) she’s played with a careful stiffness that perhaps shows us a glimpse of the Lady Catherine she might turn into without swift intervention. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, and this isn’t a commentary on Anya Taylor Joy either—her appearance or her acting ability—but I just don’t like her as Emma. And she’s not the sole problem, she turns in a solid performance, she’s a good actress, but something about this characterization is just off-color to me. Anya Taylor Joy plays a great mean-girl; but I think that’s one of the reasons why they thought she’d be a good choice for this role, and it’s one of the prime reasons I don’t think she wasright for it. Emma is a deeply flawed character and, of course, the biggest turning point in her story comes as a result of a thoughtlessly mean remark to someone who has only ever shown her deference, hospitality and gratitude.
All that said, Emma is not, at her core, a cruel person. Emma has gone all her life thinking condescending things about Miss Bates but it’s only when Frank comes along and validates her less kind commentaries that she actually starts to voice them in search of validation from a peer.
The problem with this in the context of 2020’s Emma Woodhouse is that Frank hardly gets a look-in in this adaptation. Emma’s relationship with him is severely underdeveloped and the actors don’t have enough chemistry to pull it off in the limited time they’re given. The result is that Emma appears to cross a line just to cross it, and it pushes Emma’s character from thoughtless to out-and-out frigid.
Still better than Doran Godwin, since she's identifiably human.
Rating: 2 1/2 / 5 Half-finished portraits
NUMBER 3: 1996 (MIRAMAX)
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Portrayed by: Gwyneth Paltrow
Age at time of filming: 24
Despite the fact that Gwyneth Paltrow was an appalling casing choice for Emma Woodhouse (I will be forever salty that they passed over Joely Richardson), and I know there are some who will think me, at best, crazy (sacrilegious, at worst) for ranking 1996’s interpretation of Emma higher than 2020, I actually feel that solidly in the middle is right where this version of the character belongs.
There’s so much wrong with this Emma: she swings from mature to bizarrely infantile at the drop of a hat, much of her script is genuinely tragic, Gwyneth can’t convincingly portray Emma's social naiveté, her accent is overwhelmingly nasal and impossible to listen to, just for starters.
And yet… I don’t hate her. I don’t like her particularly either, but even though much of the dialogue re-working butchered Austen’s prose, there are a lot of things McGrath seems to have gotten right about Emma’s character. Her relationship with Knightley feels comfortable and playful, and, while Emma of the book probably doesn’t really care for Harriet Smith in the spirit of true bosom friendship, I believe she does care about her and wishes to spare her (further) pain. She shows exasperation with Harriet while still being patient with her, which is very much in the spirit of the book. Her concern for Harriet at the ball feels real, and her contrition at Box Hill following Knightley’s rebuke, while not profound, at least feels like contrition and not self-pity.
Perhaps, given the soft-take that the Miramax version is, it shouldn’t be surprising that the biggest faults in characterization rest on awkward writing and the biggest triumphs highlight Emma’s better side. It’s not a very in-depth take on the character, but it at least, is an adequate one.
Rating: 3/5 Half-finished portraits
NUMBER 2: 1996/97 (ITV)
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Portrayed by: Kate Beckinsale
Age at time of filming: 23
Those who’ve read my reviews of each adaptation of Emma might be surprised to see ITV’s portrayal of the title character sitting so high on my list. To be frank, it’s a distant second, and she may have stolen the number two spot only because she’s played by Kate Beckinsale and not Gwyneth Paltrow.
In truth, I see a lot of parallels between 1997’s Emma and 2020’s. Both actresses were 23 (or thereabouts) when they played the role, both have extremely childish moments, and both crumple down and burst into tears that don’t feel entirely genuine after Box Hill.
So why is 1997 on the good side of the number 3 spot and 2020 isn’t? I’m not precisely sure. I think it may be because Andrew Davies (and/or Diarmuid Lawrence) at least understood the scale of Emma Woodhouse’s wealth and status. This Emma feels sufficiently self-important, a bit haughty, sure—but she’s also believably naïve. You feel her isolation, you understand her caring relationship with her father, and she’s not as patently rude to Robert Martin compared to the 2020 version (she at least acknowledges his presence when he meets Emma and Harriet in the lane).
Grudging though this favorable placement may be, I can at least acknowledge that Emma herself is the least of my problems with this version, and even though Beckinsale’s acting is a bit sketchy at certain points, she also has some truly great moments, especially her interaction with Robert Martin at the end of the film. This portrayal is consistent, and Emma’s better qualities aren’t overpowered by her negative ones.
Rating: 4/5 Half-finished portraits
Number 1: 2009
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Portrayed by: Romola Garai
Age at time of filming: 26
And in a shocking twist—I’m kidding this is neither shocking nor unexpected to anyone who knows me or has read my blog/reviews of the Emma adaptations. Am I totally biased? Probably. I don’t care, this is a completely subjective list. Here, finally—my first and true love as Emma Woodhouse—is Romola Garai. I suppose it’s also not surprising that the first actress I ever saw in the role would still be my favorite a decade on. I just love everything about this interpretation of the character. She rides the very difficult line of being bright, caring and intelligent, while also being completely naïve and lacking in social savvy (in her own age-group at least), coddled, and painfully sure of her own self-importance.
Even though Garai was 25 or 26 at the time (far too old for the character—almost as old as Doran Godwin) her energy and charisma are enough that she’s able to carry it off convincingly. Everything about this Emma screams youth, and when Emma’s child-like social ignorance is her most prominent characteristic, it feels authentic and natural. Equally authentic are her emotions—her love for her family, her dynamic with Knightley, he exasperation, patience, and concern with Harriet. Most of all though, this Emma seems to experience the most maturation in the last quarter of the story. Box Hill really feels like a turning point—not just a chastened young woman, but a true coming-of-age moment. Emma faces a reckoning here that begins a chain reaction culminating in her realization of her feelings for Knightley, and everything from the writing to Garai’s performance conveys the magnitude of this shift in Emma’s life.
This version of the character seems the most… complete to me. Somehow, between Romola Garai’s vibrancy, Sandy Welch’s screenplay and Jim O’Hanlon’s direction, this interpretation takes an extremely divisive character and helps the viewer understand just why everyone in Highbury loves Emma Woodhouse.
Rating: 5/5 Half-finished portraits
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If you liked this, check out my rankings of Mr. and Mrs. Weston
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katlime · 2 months ago
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And now, our first adaptation of Austen Month, this lesser known BBC adaptation of Emma made in the 70s.
Support us on Patreon HERE: https://www.patreon.com/lime_and_dragon
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catherinesboleyn · 11 months ago
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The Many Faces of Anne Boleyn
Clara Kimball Young (1912)
Henny Porten (Anna Boleyn, 1920)
Merle Oberon (The Private Life of Henry VIII, 1933)
Joyce Redman (Anne of the Thousand Days, 1949)
Elaine Stewart (Young Bess, 1953)
Vanessa Redgrave (A Man For All Seasons, 1966)
Genevieve Bujold (Anne of the Thousand Days, 1969)
Dorothy Tutin (The Six Wives of Henry VIII, 1970)
Charlotte Rampling (Henry VIII and His Six Wives, 1972)
Barbara Kellerman (Henry VIII, 1979)
Julia Marsen (The Six Wives of Henry VIII, 2001)
Jodhi May (The Other Boleyn Girl, 2003)
Helena Bonham Carter (Henry VIII, 2003)
Natalie Dormer (The Tudors, 2007-2008)
Natalie Portman (The Other Boleyn Girl, 2008)
Emma Connell (Henry & Anne: The Lovers Who Changed History, 2011)
Claire Foy (Wolf Hall, 2015)
Claire Cooper (Six Wives with Lucy Worsley, 2016)
Alice Nokes (The Spanish Princess, 2020)
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leresidentartist · a year ago
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As I previously wrote: “..none [of the songs] get us there quite like its eleven o’clock number, “Audition (The Fools Who...
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scotianostra · 9 months ago
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Happy 78th Birthday Billy Connolly.
The comedian and actor we know as The Big Yin was born on November 24th 1942 in Glasgow, into a poor and not altogether stable family; he left school at age 15 and served as (among other jobs) a shipyard worker, a paratrooper in the Territorial Army, and a welder, the latter including a stint building an oil rig in Nigeria. 
Shortly after his return, Connolly quit working and, supporting himself with the money he'd saved, concentrated on learning to play folk music on the banjo and guitar. He became a regular on the Glasgow folk scene, instantly recognizable with his wild hair and beard; he drifted in and out of several bands before forming the Humblebums with guitarist Tam Harvey in 1965. Gerry Rafferty (later of Stealers Wheel and "Baker Street" fame) joined sometime later, and the group built a following with their live performances, which spotlighted Connolly's humorous between-song bits. 
As Rafferty's songs became the Humblebums' primary musical focus, tensions among the members escalated; Harvey departed, and Connolly and Rafferty recorded two albums in 1969 and 1970 before disagreements over Connolly's concert comedy split them up in 1971.
Billy soon began performing around Scotland and northern England, concentrating more on comedy but still mixing occasional folk songs into his act. 1972 saw the release of his first album, Live, and also the debut of The Great Northern Welly Boot Show, a musical play Connolly co-authored with poet Tom Buchan based on his experiences in the shipyards of Glasgow. The show was a hit in Edinburgh and London, and Polydor signed Connolly to a recording contract. 
In 1974, his Solo Concert album sparked protests from the Christian community over a rowdy routine in which Connolly described the Last Supper as if it had taken place in Glasgow; all the publicity only helped his career, and he was quickly becoming one of Scotland's favourite entertainers. His 1974 follow-up album, Cop Yer Whack for This, became his biggest hit yet, going gold in the U.K., and his comic take on Tammy Wynette's "D.I.V.O.R.C.E." became a surprise number one hit single in 1975. That same year also saw Connolly put in star-making appearances on Michael Parkinson's chat show and at the London Palladium. He consolidated his success with a rigorous touring schedule over the next few years continuing to release comedy recordings on a regular basis into the '80s, the best known of which were In The Brownies and the theme to Supergran.
During the late '70s, Connolly had began taking on acting roles in television and film productions, and tried his hand at playwriting, with somewhat less success. His first marriage dissolved in 1981 amidst an affair with comedienne Pamela Stephenson (whom he would later marry in 1989, the same year he first shaved off his trademark shaggy beard).  Taking up residence in London with Stephenson, Connolly continued his comedy career while taking on more theatrical and television roles. Toward the late '80s, his appearances on American television became more frequent, which -- along with an unsold pilot for a Dead Poets Society series -- helped Connolly land a gig replacing Howard Hesseman on the high school honour-student comedy Head of the Class in 1990. 
His highest-profile American exposure was short-lived, however, as the series was cancelled after just one season; however, Connolly was back on American airwaves in early 1992, starring in the sitcom Billy. It too was cancelled after a short run,  after an appearance in the film Indecent Proposal, Connolly returned home, (though he still officially resided in the Hollywood Hills). 
In 1994, Billy hosted the acclaimed series World Tour of Scotland, which explored the flavour of contemporary Scottish culture. It proved so successful that Connolly hosted two further exploration-themed BBC series: 1995's A Scot in the Arctic, in which he spent a week on a remote northern Canadian island, and 1996's World Tour of Australia, lent a new respectability to Connolly 1997 Ssaw The Big Yin appear in the historical dramas Deacon Brodie  and  Mrs. Brown, the latter of which also featured Judi Dench and was released worldwide to much acclaim.
In 2012, Connolly provided the voice of King Fergus in Pixar's Scotland-set animated film Brave, alongside fellow Scottish actors Kelly Macdonald, Craig Ferguson, Robbie Coltrane, Emma Thompson, and Kevin McKidd. Connolly appeared as Wilf in Quartet, a 2012 British comedy-drama film based on the play Quartet by Ronald Harwood, directed by Dustin Hoffman.  In 2014, he appeared in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies as Dáin II Ironfoot, a great dwarf warrior and cousin of Thorin II Oakenshield. Sir Peter Jackson stated that "We could not think of a more fitting actor to play Dain Ironfoot, the staunchest and toughest of dwarves, than Billy Connolly, the Big Yin himself. With Billy stepping into this role, the cast of The Hobbit is now complete. We can't wait to see him on the battlefield."
In September 2013, Connolly underwent minor surgery for early-stage prostate cancer. The announcement also stated that he was being treated for the initial symptoms of Parkinson's disease.  Connolly had acknowledged earlier in 2013 that he had started to forget his lines during performances, adding later he was also finding it hard to remember how to play his banjo. 
On his 75th birthday Glasgow bestowed upon Billy three giant  murals to add to the many murals in the city.
In 2007 and again in 2010, he was voted the greatest stand-up comic on Channel 4's 100 Greatest Stand-Ups. He once again topped the list on Channel 5's Greatest Stand-Up Comedians, broadcast on New Year's Eve 2013. Billy's last big screen role was in 2016 in Wild Oats, which had Hollywood Stars Shirley MacLaine, Demi Moore and Jessica Lange.
In recent years he has established himself as an artist. In 2020, he stated "My art is about revealing myself" as he unveiled the fifth release of his Born on a Rainy Day collection in London.
Billy was on our small screen last year in Great American Trail, wfollowed him as he replicated the route taken by Scottish immigrants who came to America in the early 18th century.  He also brought out a new book, called Tall Tales and Wee Stories, to launch it Billy's face was projected on to buildings in Glasgow and Edinburgh.
In November 2019, The Evening Times named Connolly as The Greatest Glaswegian as determined by a public poll.
Connolly is a patron of the National Association for Bikers with a Disability.  His first sculpture, which is inspired by his past as a welder, was released in March 2020. as seen in the pic, the sculpture shows God welding the world together
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iamthebricklayer · 6 months ago
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Cars I love from movies/tv shows, in no particular order:
Emma’s 1972 Volkswagen Super Beetle Type 1 from Once Upon A Time:
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Bella’s 1963 Chevrolet StepSide C-10 pickup truck from Twilight:
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Edward’s Volvo C30 T5 from Twilight:
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Nick’s 1986 Yugo GV from Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist:
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Dom’s 1970 Dodge Charger R/T from The Fast & The Furious franchise:
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Landon’s 1967 Chevrolet Camaro from A Walk to Remember:
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Keith’s 1962 Chevrolet StepSide C-10 pickup truck from Keith:
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Mia’s 1966 Ford Mustang from The Princess Diaries:
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There are some I probably forgot...I might edit and add more later!
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anne-the-quene · 10 months ago
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Anne Boleyn on Stage and Screen
Giuditta Pasta in the Teatro Carcano‘s production of the opera Anna Bolena (this was the original production of this opera and the title role was written specifically for her voice) — 1830
Apollonia Bertucca in the New York premiere of Anna Bolena — 1850
Violet Vanbrugh in the Lyecum Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 1892
Clara Kimball Young in a short film about Cardinal Wolsey — 1912
Henny Porten in the film Anna Boleyn — 1920
Merle Oberon in the film The Private Life of Henry VIII — 1933
Vivien Leigh in the Open Air Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 1936
Sara Scuderi in Gran Teatre del Liceu‘s production of Anna Bolena — 1947
Joyce Redman in the Broadway production of Anne of the Thousand Days — 1949
Elaine Stewart in the film Young Bess — 1953
Maria Callas in La Scala’s production of Anna Bolena — 1957
Gloria Davy in the American Opera Society’s production of Anna Bolena — 1957
Leyla Gencer in Anna Bolena — 1965
Vanessa Redgrave in the film A Man For All Seasons — 1966
Genevieve Bujold in the film Anne of the Thousand Days — 1969
Dorothy Tutin in the BBC miniseries The Six Wives of Henry VIII — 1970
Charlotte Rampling in the film Henry VIII and His Six Wives — 1972
Beverly Sills in the New York City Opera’s production of Anna Bolena - 1973
Marisa Galvany in the New York City Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 1974
Barbara Kellerman in the BBC production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 1979
Joan Sutherland in the San Francisco Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 1984
Oona Kirsch in the film God’s Outlaw — 1986
Edita Gruberová in Anna Bolena — 1994
Julia Marsen in the documentary The Six Wives of Henry VIII — 2001
Jodhi May in the BBC TV movie The Other Boleyn Girl — 2003
Helena Bonham Carter in the ITV TV movie Henry VIII — 2003
An uncredited actress in the History Happened Here segment Henry VIII & Anne Boleyn — 2007
Mariella Devia in Anna Bolena — 2007
Natalie Dormer in the Showtime series The Tudors — 2007-2008, 2010
Natalie Portman in the film The Other Boleyn Girl — 2008
Karen Peakes in the Folger Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 2010
Miranda Raison in Howard Brenton’s play Anne Boleyn — 2010
Hasmik Papian in the Dallas Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 2010
Miranda Raison in the Globe Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 2010
Anna Netrebko in the Vienna State Opera’s and Metropolitan Opera’s productions of Anna Bolena — 2011
Emma Connell in the documentary Henry & Anne: The Lovers Who Changed History — 2011
Keri Alkema in the Minnesota Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 2012
Jo Herbert in the UK tour of Howard Brenton’s Anne Boleyn — 2012
Rochelle Hart in the Opera Seria UK’s production of Anna Bolena — 2012
Anna Jullienne in the Auckland Theatre Company’s production of Howard Brenton’s Anne Boleyn — 2013
Serena Farncocchia in the Welsh National Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 2013
Fleur Keith in the play Fallen in Love: The Secret Heart of Anne Boleyn performed at the Tower of London — 2013
Tara Breathnach in the documentary The Last Days of Anne Boleyn — 2013
Kathryn Myles in the Actors Shakespeare Project’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 2013-2014
Miou Kazune in the Japanese musical Lady Bess — 2014-2017
Sondra Radvanovsky in several productions of Anna Bolena including at The Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Metropolitan Opera, among others — 2014-2015
Claire Foy in the BBC miniseries Wolf Hall — 2015
Harriet Green in the documentary Inside the Court of Henry VIII — 2015
Lydia Leonard in both the West End and Broadway productions of Wolf Hall Parts One & Two — 2015
An unknown actress in the Spanish TV series Carlos, rey emperador — 2015
Claire Cooper in the documentary Six Wives with Lucy Worsley (also known as Secrets of the Six Wives) — 2016
Fleur Keith in the short film I Am Henry — 2016
Harriet Green in the documentary The Six Queens of Henry VIII (also known as Henry VIII and His Six Wives) — 2016; Archive footage of Green in this documentary was also featured in the documentary series Elizabeth I — 2017
Krystin Pellerin in the CW series Reign, season 3 episode “To the Death” — 2016
Gemma Whalen in an episode of the CBBC series Horrible Histories — 2017
Ashleigh Weir in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival production of the musical Six — 2017
Christina Modestou in the Off-West End production of Six — 2017
Millie O’Connell in the original West End production of Six — 2018-2019
Angela Meade in several productions of Anna Bolena throughout the years, most recently in ABAO Bilbao’s production — 2019
Hazel Karooma-Brooker in the Norwegian Cruise Line production of Six — 2019
An uncredited actress in the Starz series The Spanish Princess, season 1 episode “All Is Lost” — 2019
Andrea Macasaet in the North American tour and original Broadway productions of Six — 2019-2020
Courtney Bowman in the West End production of Six — 2019-2020
Maddison Bulleyment in the UK tour of Six — 2019-2020
Kala Gare in the Australian tour of Six — 2020
Alice Nokes in The Spanish Princess part 2 — 2020
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thebossofcute · a month ago
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Every Mr. Weston, Ranked and Rated
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“Mr. Weston was a native of Highbury, and born of a respectable family, which for the last two or three generations had been rising into gentility and property. He had received a good education, but on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged; and had satisfied an active cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his country, then embodied.
“Captain Weston was a general favourite; and when the chances of his military life had introduced him to Miss Churchill, of a great Yorkshire family, and Miss Churchill fell in love with him, nobody was surprised except her brother and his wife, who had never seen him, and who were full of pride and importance, which the connection would offend….
“It was an unsuitable connection, and did not produce much happiness. Mrs. Weston ought to have found more in it, for she had a husband whose warm heart and sweet temper made him think everything due to her in return for the great goodness of being in love with him; but though she had one sort of spirit, she had not the best…They lived beyond their income… she did not cease to love her husband, but she wanted at once to be the wife of Captain Weston, and Miss Churchill of Enscombe.
“Captain Weston, who had been considered, especially by the Churchills, as making such an amazing match, was proved to have much the worst for the bargain; for when his wife died after a three years’ marriage, he was rather a poorer man than at first, and with a child to maintain…
“A complete change of life became desirable. He quitted the militia and engaged in trade. Having brothers already established in a good way in London, which afforded him a favourable opening. It was a concern which brought him just employment enough. He had still a small house in Highbury, where most of his leisure days were spent; and between useful occupation and the pleasures of society, the next eighteen or twenty years of his life passed cheerfully away. He had, by that time, realized and easy competence—enough to secure the purchase of a little estate adjoining Highbury, which he had always longed for—enough to marry a woman as portionless even as Miss Taylor, and to live according to the wishes of his own family and social disposition.” –Emma, Chapter 2
I’ve included such a large portion of quotation on Mr. Weston because there are details here that no adaptation has ever managed squeeze in, particularly his history in the military. It’s a shame because the entirety of Chapter 2 is devoted to exploring Mr. Weston’s history and relationship to the denizens of Highbury; that the purchase of Randalls and his marriage to Miss Taylor are long cherished aspirations that he’s only recently been able to realize.
Number 5: 1972
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Portrayed by: Raymond Adamson
Age at time of filming: 52
There are cases in these lists where it’s hard to rank because all of the interpretations are great, and there are cases where it’s just too easy to slap someone in the bottom spot. This is the latter.
I suppose all-in-all, this is an acceptable version of Mr. Weston, but it’s definitely the worst. My only real problem with it is the writing and direction. I’m a little baffled as to why they decided to write Mr. Weston quite so… rustic. Quite apart from the way he talks, there’s his general behavior on Box Hill (sleeping splayed out on the grass, laughing outright when Emma makes fun of Miss Bates), it’s all sort of verges on uncouth.
Rating: 2/5 Spare umbrellas
Number 4: 1996/97 (ITV)
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Portrayed by: James Hazeldine
Age at time of filming: 49
In this ranking list, number four is the “meh” spot and I’m afraid 1997 finds itself in this place on this particular round because that’s exactly how I feel about this interpretation of Mr. Weston. James Hazeldine does a fine job. He plays a perfectly acceptable Mr. Weston, who’s written in a perfectly acceptable manner.
And I’m afraid that’s this version’s greatest failing. I struggle to remember him at all. He’s just sort of there. My heart never pangs for him when Frank disappoints him. I never really consider what his life might have been like before the events of Emma, or that he even had a life before. He’s just Samantha Bond’s husband; not so much a character as he is a presence.
Rating: 3/5 Spare umbrellas
Number 3: 1996 (Miramax)
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Portrayed by: James Cosmo
Age at time of filming: 49
On the flipside of 1996, no one can accuse James Cosmo of not being memorable. As with Mrs. Weston, the top 3 Mr. Westons find themselves jockeying for the lead positions and this interpretation finds itself in the number three spot only because Robert Bathurst and Rupert Graves also exist in this role.
Mr. Weston, also like his wife, is a tough character to mess up (although the 1972 version proved that it was indeed possible). He’s been through some shit, but he’s got a happy disposition and he’s always moving forward through life, seldom looking back at anything (the one exception is his son.) Perhaps it’s because this interpretation embodies that so well, that my not thinking about Mr. Weston’s backstory doesn’t bother me so much with this version.
Mr. Weston is the soul of cheer and indiscriminate generosity and you don’t get much cheerier than 1996’s Mr. Weston.
Rating: 4/5 Spare umbrellas
Number 2: 2009
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Portrayed by: Robert Bathurst
Age at time of filming: 52
OMG, OMG GUYS ARE YOU SURPRISED? 2009 isn’t in the number 1 spot! WOW! You know I’m surprised myself, but we’ll talk more about that in the next section. Even though Robert Bathurst didn’t land the number one spot after all, it was a very close run thing, and the difference between number one and number two here is within a hair’s breadth.
This is a Mr. Weston who I can easily imagine as a young, well-liked, affable Captain in the local militia, (even though it’s never mentioned in this adaptation, which otherwise does a very good job of setting up all of the character’s stories by flashing back a bit to before the events of the main plot.) Here, at least, you get to see a bit of the real, hard life choices Mr. Weston had to make; the undercurrent of regret that sending Frank away meant he could hardly have a relationship with his son, and how the necessity of that separation pains him in his later life. His purchase of Randalls is the first step of his plan to have a happy and complete life after twenty-odd years of hard work (marrying Miss Taylor is the second).
My heart does pang for 2009’s Mr. Weston (as it’s clearly supposed to.) Where 1997 didn’t bother to stir me, and 1996 didn’t let me be stirred because it glossed over the ramifications of Mr. Weston’s choices as it glossed over everything else. 2009’s Mr. Weston is just as cheery and full as generous, but he’s also a bit worried about his son. He’s hurt when said son disappoints him, and it’s a deeply human treatment of what is really a very complex character.
Rating: 5/5 Spare umbrellas
Number 1: 2020
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Portrayed by: Rupert Graves
Age at time of filming: 56
With as glowing and full of praise as I am for Emma2009’s sensitivity, its emotion, its space and willingness to explore the depth of its characters, you very well might wonder why I didn’t put its interpretation of Mr. Weston in the top spot. Well I did, actually. But then I gave it a good, long think and realized that Robert Bathurst was no longer the Mr. Weston I imagined in my head when I read the book.
That’s right it is, now, in fact, Rupert Graves. Congratulations 2020! You did it! With one character, at least, you displaced 2009 in my mental cast of Emma. Rupert Graves does just as spiffing a job as Mr. Weston as Robert Bathurst does and with a lot less room to move around.
But in spite of the lack of time, I still feel that the subtext of concern is almost, if not equally well explored in the little screentime Mr. Weston is granted by the format. Rupert Graves is also easy to imagine as the Captain-turned-Tradesman and he’s delightful too. He’s so full of generosity, shouting over the din about how he’s sure they can house everyone at Randalls for the night during the Christmas Snow incident (I’m sure you could, too, Mr. Weston, your house is HUGE—but that’s for a different ranking list.) For once I’m giving a top spot, not primarily on the script’s treatment of the character but on the strength of the actor’s performance, because for me, walking away from my initial viewing, 2020’s Mr. Weston was just that impactful.
Rating: 5/5 Spare umbrellas
~~~~~
If you liked this, check out my rankings of Emma Woodhouse and Mrs. Weston
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big-urchin-energy · 6 months ago
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I keep seeing people arguing about how old Michael Shelley is, since he was hired to replace Fiona Law (who apparently died in 2003), but he’s also supposed to have worked at with Eric Delano (who we know died when Gerry was young), so what’s the truth? Well I adore Michael Shelley and have spent far too long thinking about him, so, here is why I believe Michael Shelley was around 40 years old when he was fed to the Spiral (putting my B in gcse English lit to good use I guess). Buckle in lads, this is a long one. *Spoilers up to MAG 167*
Evidence that Michael was hired in 2003:
MAG 29 (Statement given 1972)
Fiona Law, the research assistant who took the statement, passed away in 2003 from complications following a liver transplant, and with two exceptions no-one else working for the Institute at the time is still employed here. Gertrude Robinson was there, of course, but we can’t exactly ask her, and Elias was working as a filing clerk at the time. I followed up with him, and he does remember there being something of a commotion around that time
Notice anything about this? Namely, the fact that the timeline for Elias is wrong? This quote could be considered to be hinting that ‘Elias’ is not really Elias, since we know the original Elias Bouchard was hired in 1991 (MAG 49)
Elias Bouchard is a difficult man to pin down. Certainly since he became head of the Institute in 1996, taking over from James Wright, who ran the place from ‘73 until he passed away.
It was a remarkably fast climb to the top, as from what I can find, it looks like he only joined the Institute five years before in 1991, working in the Artefact Storage.
Along with the fact that it states that Fiona died “following a liver transplant”, which we know is not the case, this to me is a clear sign that this should not be taken at face value.
Evidence that Michael was not hired in 2003:
1. Eric Delano mentions him by name in MAG154, so regardless of whatever else happened, we have firsthand evidence that Michael and Eric worked together
ERIC
You know, you were never actually all that nice to me when I worked for you, Gertrude. Not like Michael, or Emma.
(And as we know, Eric quit at some point after Gerry was born, likely after 1991 when Elias was hired (MAG 49), because he mentioned knowing him too)
GERTRUDE
James? He died about twelve years ago. Elias is Head of the Institute now.
ERIC
Elias? Elias Bouchard, seriously?!
GERTRUDE
Hm, he’s changed a lot.
ERIC
Must have!
2. If MAG167 is broadly chronological, Jon talks about Fiona dying, then Michael joining, and then Eric disappearing In That Order
Eventually, Fiona was replaced by a young man named Michael. Far too young to have such a job, really, but – things were different in those days. He was keen and eager, and Emma had a – slightly different idea of how to test him.
She never really touched Eric, of course. He had been marked early by another who Emma was… keen not to cross.
But young Michael? So innocent, so naive? She decided to experiment with how long she could keep him in the dark as to what was really going on.
As it turns out: All his life.
This time, Gertrude did have an inkling as to what was happening, but had her own escalating conflicts to concern herself with, and recognized the potential in a truly ignorant assistant.
At some point Eric disappeared.
Additional things about this:
“Far too young to have such a job” seems to me like Michael was around 20 in the late 80s to early 90s
“things were different in those days” is not the way most people tend to talk about 2003, and “All his life” doesn’t exactly scream ‘in the 6 years that he worked at the institute from 2003-09’.
Later on in the statement, Jon implies that Michael was already the Distortion when Agnes Montague died in 2006, while The Great Twisting apparently took place after October 2009, however, I don’t know anything about Agnes’ timeline, except that it is also Weird, so I won’t comment on this. It was probably a mistake on Jonny’s part, but I’d be willing to accept Spiral-Flavoured Fuckery. And speaking of Jonny:
3. This quote from Jonny’s twitter
I've made plenty of timeline mistakes over the course of writing 160+ episodes, but *shrug*. I'd say the fandom has broadly interpreted Michael as younger than he was explicitly written, but the events are what matter and y'all can square dates however you care to.
Since I’m here, I may as well be completely upfront about the entire tweet and not take just the part of the quote that fits what I believe, because I’m trying to help people make a balanced judgement and it would be shitty of me to withhold information, and also say that I agree. I specifically have nothing against gerrymichael shippers, I do not care about the age gap either way, and if you want to say they're the same age you can. (I don’t personally ship them bc I think they’re both aro, but) that’s the joy of fanfic and headcanons! People are always talking about the... interesting TMA timelines, and want clear cut answers, and I have one interpretation of the text which I believe to be correct, but if you disagree that’s fine, please let me know if you think I’ve made any mistakes, or I’ve missed anything (as long as you’re nice about it).
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perpetuallyperceiving · a year ago
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Proposed Timeline for the Archival Workers and Related Characters, Guided by The Coffin
Or, Jonny has made some timeline contradictions canon and I am doing my best to wrangle them into something that makes sense. It’s like Jonny accidentally making Adelard Dekker have a crisis of faith by implication at some point, but much worse. Jonny has recently stated on Twitter “I’ve made plenty of timeline mistakes over the course of writing 160+ episodes, but *shrug*. I’d say the fandom has broadly interpreted Michael as younger than he was explicitly written, but the events are what matter and y’all can square dates however you care to.” So that’s what I’m doing!
I am also linking a TL;DR of the timeline I prepared in the reblogs. It’ll probably be more confusing, but I know you might be limited on time. 
So, the Coffin? Yes, the Do Not Open Coffin. Jonny has made an absolute mess of the timeline with this latest episode due to four factors: Eric Delano mentioning Michael Shelley to Gertrude, Michael replacing Fiona Law as an assistant when it was previously stated she died in 2003, Gerry Keay being a teenager by 2002 at the latest, and Agnes Montague meeting Gertrude between 2009 and 2011 after her death in 2006.
The Agnes thing is a really weird paradox and my only explanation is that she was a ghost (I’ll get to that later). However, with the Fiona, Michael, and Eric problem, I believe I’ve found a middle ground between the pulling factors of the implication of Eric leaving the Institute in the 1980s and Fiona dying in the 2000s. Literally. 1996 was a happening year.
Fiona Law fell prey to the Coffin. I decided to track the Coffin and try to determine when Emma Harvey would have caught wind of it and led Fiona to her doom. In a document, I laid out the timelines of the Archival employees and related characters and decided to see how they could be arranged around the factor of the Coffin Encounter. My final product is not perfect and likely does not match Jonny’s exact vision. However, I think it does do a good job of making sense of what is now canon.
Set in stone dates are bold, time ranges and event guesses are in italics, and points with elaboration under the cut will have asterisks (*). I’ve indicated the statements where I’ve pulled information, but if you want excerpts supporting what I’ve put down, please let me know. I have so many excerpts. 14 pages of them.
Circa 1965: Angus Stacey, the Head Archivist, is killed. Gertrude Robinson assumes the position of Head Archivist. The middle-aged Fiona Law decides to remain an archival assistant. Gertrude employs Eric and Emma, who are young like her, as her other archival assistants. (MAG167 Curiosity, MAG158 Panopticon, MAG004 Pageturner)
1972, June 4: Fiona Law took the statement of Nathaniel Thorp. Elias Bouchard was working as a filing clerk at the time. (MAG 029 Cheating Death)
1973: James Wright becomes head of The Magnus Institute, almost certainly after Jonah possessed him. He took over from Richard Mendelson. (MAG049 The Butcher’s Window, MAG167 Curiosity)
1987: Gerard Keay is born.**
1991: Eric Delano marries Mary Keay. Their marriage will last 5 years. After they are married, Mary Keay tells him the truth about the Entities.** (MAG154 Bloody Mary)
1991: According to Jon, Elias Bouchard joins the Institute in artifact storage. In actuality, Elias transferred to artifact storage.* (MAG049 The Butcher’s Window)
1993 to 1996: Breekon & Hope take over the Breekon & Hope delivery company. During this time, “John” convinces them to deliver the Coffin to people. (MAG096 Return to Sender, MAG128 Heavy Goods)
1994: Eric begins to try to find out a way to quit The Magnus Institute. It takes him two years to be successful. (MAG154 Bloody Mary)
1996, May 15: Statement of Alfred Breekon, regarding a new pair of workers at his delivery company. (MAG096 Return to Sender)
1996, Early or Mid: Fiona and Emma follow up on the Breekon statement. When they track down Breekon & Hope, they find the Coffin. Fiona enters the Coffin and thus Too Close I Cannot Breathe. (MAG167 Curiosity)
1996, Early or Mid: Eventually, Michael Shelley, a young man, replaces Fiona. As he is “far too young to have such a job,” he is likely 17 years old.*** (MAG167 Curiosity)
1996, Late: Eric quits his job by destroying his eyes. (MAG154 Bloody Mary)
1996, Late: After Eric leaves the Institute, Elias, the new body of Jonah Magnus, becomes head of The Magnus Institute (MAG049 The Butcher’s Window, MAG154 Bloody Mary)
1997, Early: A few months after Eric leaves the Institute, Mary kills him and binds him in the Skin Book. In this timeline, Gerry would have been 9 or 10 years old.** (MAG154 Bloody Mary)
1998, November 22: Joshua Gillespie gives the Do Not Open statement, speaking of how he lived with the Coffin for almost two years. Joshua does not specify when he started to live with it, just in the 90s. In the words of Breekon, this is “when the test finally failed.” Breekon & Hope are stuck with the Coffin. (MAG002, MAG128 Heavy Goods)
Between 1996 and Before 2003: Sarah Carpenter becomes an archival assistant and intrigues Emma (MAG167 Curiosity)
2002, June 4: Statement of Harold Silvana, regarding discoveries made during the renovation of the Reform Club, Pall Mall. He relates how a teenage Gerry takes a Leitner from the site, which he later takes to his mother. In this timeline, Gerry would have been 15 years old.** (MAG035 Old Passages and MAG111 Family Business)
2003: Fiona Law is reported as dead due to complications following a liver transplant. She had died in the Buried. Her body was discovered and Sectioned police officers under Elias’ thumb helped cover up the circumstances.**** (MAG 029 Cheating Death)
2003: Around August, Sarah Carpenter investigates the house of the A Sturdy Lock. Emma is disappointed by her not being eaten by a Spiral door. (MAG027, MAG167 Curiosity)
2006, November 23: Agnes Montague hangs herself in her Sheffield flat after Evo Lensik uproots the tree and uncovers the Web Apple at Hilltop and after kissing Jack Barnabas. (MAG008 Burned Out, MAG067 Burning Desire)
2008, July 3: Mary gives her statement and Eric’s page to Gertrude before binding herself in the Skin Book (MAG062 First Edition)
2008, July 21: Eric gives his posthumous statement to Gertrude. He asks her to find Gerry, in exchange. She burns him sometime after. (MAG154 Bloody Mary)
2008, September: Mary binds herself to the Skin Book, Gerry gets tried but acquitted. His mother hangs around for the next 5 years. (MAG004 Pageturner)
Early 2009: The ritual site in Scotland that bound Gertrude to Agnes (with the Web’s help) is disrupted by Jason North. It goes poorly for him. He gives a statement about it on August 6th. (MAG037 Burnt Offering, MAG145 Infectious Doubts)
2009, February 2: After the ritual circle is broken, Arthur Nolan and Gertrude Robinson have a conversation about Agnes. Gertrude says “Well, for all the Web bound us together, I never actually met her. What was she like?” (MAG145 Infectious Doubts)
2009, October 11: Deborah Madaki gives a statement about her Pottery Class and the Spiral avatar Gabriel, the Worker of Clay, who sent her a letter the week before inviting her to work with him in Sannikovland. (MAG126 Sculptor’s Tool)
Between October 11, 2009 and 2011: Gertrude takes Michael to Sannikovland, gives him a map, and send him to his undoing. According to this timeline, Michael is between 30 and 32 years old. (MAG101 Another Twist)
After 2009, before 2011: Sarah is consumed by an avatar of the Desolation after Emma leads her to it. (MAG167 Curiosity)
After 2009, before 2011: Agnes has her first and only meeting with Gertrude. Agnes is a ghost.***** She confirms “what Gertrude knew [about Emma’s role], and the details of Sarah’s suffering” and agrees to an arrangement with Gertrude to burn Emma Harvey alive. There is no mention of if the flat also burns. (MAG167 Curiosity)
Circa 2011: Gertrude meets Jurgen Leitner. By this point, all of her assistants are dead. (MAG080 The Librarian)
2013: Gertrude comes to Gerry and gets rid of Mary. He begins to act as an unofficial assistant for her. (MAG111 Family Business)
2014, Sometime After October 9: Gerry suffers a seizure in Pittsburgh when travelling with Gertrude to research the Unknowing, is taken to the hospital, finds out that he has a brain tumor, and is bound to the Skin Book by Gertrude. In this timeline, he would have been 27 years old. (MAG107 Third Degree, MAG137 Nemesis)
Between March 13th and March 20th: Elias shoots Gertrude when she is in the midst of preparing to light the Archives on fire. This occurred sometime during the failed Dark Ritual. Elias reports finding her desk covered in blood and Gertrude missing on the 15th. (I am disregarding the Uncanny Valley error) (MAG025 Growing Dark, MAG040 Human Remains; MAG158 Panopticon)
2015, June 8: Michael makes his first known debut in a statement as the Distortion. Poor Lydia Halligan. (MAG074 Fatigue)
2016: Lynne Hammond, after a few nights of smelling something burning, encounters an on-fire ghost of a young woman in her flat in Clapton who reached out to her, singed her, and then disappeared. She makes a statement about it May 2nd, 2017. (MAG100 I Guess You Had to be There)
Let me know if you have any corrections or suggestions (within reason).
*On Elias, the Filing Clerk and Artifact Storage Employee: Jon states in MAG049 that “It was a remarkably fast climb to the top as from what I can find, it looks like he only joined the Institute five years before in 1991, working in the artifact storage.” He seems to have forgotten Elias commenting on his memories as a filing clerk in 029 Cheating Death. This could be Jonah slipping up, but since that’s something Jon could catch him on at a too early point, I believe it makes more sense that Jon forgot about the filing clerk information because of the worm invasion that had happened since. Jon could have mistaken a record of transfer as him joining the Institute. If you choose to believe this is Jonah slipping up, it doesn’t compromise the rest of the timeline.
**On Gerry’s Timeline: Gerry’s timeline making sense was the largest casualty in this ‘Fiona Law died in 2003 and Michael was employed after her’ mess. This is because of these facts from Eric: He was married to Mary for 5 years, he tried to quit for 2 years. Two factors played into Eric’s decision: Mary telling him the truth after they were married and Eric wanting to not drag Gerry into “this life.” Jonny probably intended Gerry being born to start that 2-year timer before Eric figured out how to quit.
The thing is? Fiona being missing for 7 years before her death is reported is already a huge stretch. Pulling Fiona entering the Coffin and Michael becoming an assistant back even farther would stretch it so much more. So you have to stretch Gerry’s timeline as well.
MAG035 Old Passages is the earliest Archives statement Gerry is mentioned in. The statement could reasonably be referring to an event anywhere between 1995 after Leitner stopped leasing the office to 2002 in the months before June. Gerry is referred to as the following in the statement by Harold Silvana: “the kid,” “he looked to be in his late teens, I’d guess,” “He was only a skinny kid, but he was so strong.” I decided to pin Gerry’s age here as 15 for a few reasons. 1) I started with the 1996 date for Fiona’s death, so I knew Gerry being much older would break any believability of this timeline. 2) From experience with my brother and other guys, they can look further into their teens than they actually are. Plus, Silvana’s phrasing sounds uncertain. 3) Gerry doesn’t quite act like he is 17 or 18: he “sullenly” listens to a CD player when the workers explain his presence and when questioned he says “his mother knows all about this stuff.” 15 is definitely the lower limit, though, especially since he bowled Silvana over. With this, I have to put the statement as happening in the early months of 2002. So, 15 is reasonable.
Gerry being 15 in 2002 means he was born in 1987. This puts him at around 10 years old if Eric is murdered early in 1997. By necessity, this means that Eric married Mary in 1991, when Gerry was 5 years old. I think it’s reasonable for Mary to resist tying herself to him after she had her desired heir but eventually agreeing because she saw an advantage in it (Gerry stated she wasn’t a caring mother or a skilled teacher. Or maybe financial reasons, Leitner didn’t start purchasing until 1993 according to MAG062).
Still, as you probably know, this is not ideal! Gerry has this to say of Eric: “I never knew my dad. Not really. He worked in the Archives like you, but quit once I was born. I think he wanted to help raise me. But mum didn’t need the help, and after me she wasn’t able to have kids again, so she killed him in his sleep to practice her bookbinding.” The “once I was born thing” is broken and cannot be worked with, rip. The “I never knew my dad. Not really.” can still be worked with, though, as “knew” is fortunately a subjective term. You can know someone for a long time and still not really know them. This is especially true for kids. And with Eric working longer hours than he was pleased with, perhaps most contact was limited to the weekends even though he was a “homebody” and had no problem being left out of expeditions. In addition, if Gerry died when he was 27, it is reasonable for his memories of his dad to have faded. I’m 22 and a lot of my memories of my dad are only here because they are reinforced by photo albums. Even if Eric kept photos (probably not an album, they’re a real pill for archival preservation), they would have likely been stored away during his two year quest, as Gertrude had told him and Emma her theory that James could watch them “from any eye, even an illustration.” They could easily be forgotten, lost, or destroyed by Mary after his death.
So! Gerry’s timeline is a stretch, a bit messed up, and not exactly what Jonny intended, but Fiona Law’s timeline isn’t stretched to a ridiculous point past what Jonny established early in the series and with Curiosity. It’s a balance. The only good thing about this mess is that it implies that Gerry wanted to be called Gerry instead of Gerard because he remembered his father calling him Gerry.
***On Michael’s probable age when he was hired: How young is “far too young to have such a job?” What age group would the Magnus Archives not hire by 2018’s standards? I cannot say for certain, but I have one person I can reference: Martin Blackwood. He had to lie about his age to get hired. He dropped out of school and started to apply when he was 17, so I’m assuming he started working in the Institute when he was 17 or 18. This could apply to Michael! He either could have never gone to uni and entered the position out of high school or gotten the archival assistant position as an intern in uni. Either way, once he had the job, he was stuck. He was almost certainly younger than 21: while Master’s degrees are preferable, I’ve seen people get Public History careers after undergrad.
****On the reported death of Fiona Law in 2003: There is a 7-year gap between 1996 and 2003. I am operating under the assumption that the elderly Fiona did not have family members or acquaintances outside of The Archives who would have reported her missing. Would The Buried eject her body after death? I am using MAG033 Boatswain’s Call and MAG110 Creature Feature as a precedent. Both feature victims disappearing to an Entity’s realm. When Sean Kelly’s body washed up on shore 6 months after his disappearance, the coroner found he had only been in the water for 5 days. For Creature Feature, a shriveled corpse has washed up on a beach every year for 5 years. As for the cover-up, we know Jonah had the police under his thumb. It is not a stretch to say he would have arranged for an alternate death explanation once Fiona’s body was found and identified.
*****Agnes as a ghost, seriously?: Jonny Sims has done this to us, but at least the joke episode provides a possible explanation! There are too many statements about Agnes dying in 2006 for that not to be true. But here we have a statement about someone encountering a ghost that seems quite similar to Agnes in 2016. Could the ritual circle still tying Gertrude and Agnes together have caused Agnes to linger as a ghost? Since we have no confirmation that Emma’s flat burned along with her, perhaps she had a flat in Clapton, London that Agnes’ spirit travelled from Sheffield. Curiosity fortunately gave no details of the setting of the Agnes and Gertrude meeting. Perhaps the melancholy was compounded by the fact that Agnes was literally dead!
Jonny Sims, I am begging you, please do not introduce more timeline contradictions anytime soon.
Edit: I have made some corrections regarding the information we have about Gertrude’s death and when the ritual circle was broken in Scotland after @anemone-minus​ pointed out some errors. Thank you!
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gloriabugsnax · a year ago
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ok lads it be SUMMARY TIME:
[MAJOR TMA 167 SPOILERS AHEAD]
Gertrude replaced Angus Stacey as archivist, who was killed by a “creature of masks and smiles” - possibly the Not!Them? EDIT: Nikola?
The first ritual she took down was the Stranger’s, or the “Grinning Wheel,” using fire
The Head of the Institute when Angus Stacey was archivist was Richard Mendelssohn, presumably the predecessor of James Wright
Angus Stacey had wanted to re-organise Smirke’s 14 Fears
He left one assistant behind, named Fiona Law (Fiona was previously mentioned in MAG 29: Cheating Death, as the woman who records the statement), and she decided to remain at the Institute
Fiona is a mixture of “curiosity and cowardice,” fainting to avoid danger, meaning that by entering the realm of the End one is safe from the other fears?  
Getrude’s first three assistants therefore were: Eric Delano, Fiona Law, and Emma Harvey
Eric was first mentioned in MAG 62: First Edition, and Gertrude recorded his statement in MAG 154: Bloody Mary, where Emma was first mentioned
Emma is described as Gertrude’s confidante, and she knows about the bond between Gertrude and Agnes (MAG: 145: Infectious Doubts)
Emma would volunteer herself and Fiona to investigate statements, as she wanted to know why Fiona wasn’t dead yet, and would put Fiona into encounters with the Entities (namely the Dark and the Lonely)
The Institute found a coffin (presumably the same one that Daisy and Jon were in during season 4), and it is implied that Emma sent Fiona into it, and she never returned.
At the same time, Emma found cobwebs in her hair that would remain for the rest of her life
Fiona was replaced by Michael Shelley
Emma never touched Eric, since he had been “marked by another whom Emma was keen not to cross,” presumably Mary Keay and the End.
Emma decided to see how long she could keep Michael ignorant
Gertrude began to realise what was happening, but did nothing
Eric disappeared, presumably having blinded himself (MAG 154: Bloody Mary), and eventually being killed by Mary Keay and bound to her skin book (MAG 62: First Edition)
Emma apparently knew what had happened to Eric, although it is unclear as to whether she knew how he had been killed or how to leave the institute, and did not tell Gertrude
Sarah Carpenter (first mentioned in MAG 27: A Sturdy Lock) was Eric’s replacement, and had had some supernatural encounters of her own
Sarah is described as having a “fire,” which drew Gertrude to her
Gertrude was no longer paying attention to her assistants, since the “season of hurried rituals” was coming nearer
Emma sent Sarah into a cave with no end (Buried? Dark?), but Sarah survived
Emma sent Sarah into the woods with a book of astronomy (presumably a Leitner), where she encountered the Vast
Sarah also became affected by the Vast, with literal stars in her eyes
Emma convinced Sarah to say inside a house, so she could be eaten by a hungry door (Flesh? Spiral?), but Sarah survived again
EDIT: This could be the house from MAG 27: A Sturdy Lock
The Web helped Emma in concealing this from Gertrude
The Web also has been manipulating the entities into rituals, and providing Gertrude with plans to stop them
Sarah was killed during Gertrude and Michael’s trip to Sannikov Land, where Michael become the Distortion (MAG 101: Another Twist)
Sarah was killed by a man who “burned on the inside,” presumably a Desolation avatar.
Sarah’s last words were “Hello? I’m from the -”
The man split open to reveal heat, enveloping her
Gertrude now begins to suspect Emma, and went to Agnes Montague
Gertrude and Agnes only met once - their bond has been chosen by the Web
James Wright was now Head of the Institute (it is now 1972) EDIT: It’s Elias
Emma Harvey was killed by a Desolation avatar, possibly Agnes?
Gertrude did not want revenge, but instead to clean an “infection”
Gertrude didn’t hire any more assistants, but still worked with people - Leitner (MAG 161: Dwelling), Dekker (MAG 134: Time of Revelation), Keay and Salesa
She never allowed herself to trust (- unlike Jon?)
Without trust, Gertrude would never survive the Apocalypse - she needed an anchor
If an archivist dies with living assistants, their assistants would be free from the Eye.
So, tl;dr:
Gertrude’s assistants were: Fiona Law (in the coffin), Eric Delano (killed by Mary Keay), Emma Harvey (killed by a Desolation avatar), Michael Shelley (becomes the Distortion), and Sarah Carpenter (killed by a Desolation avatar).
And her longest surviving assistant was one influenced heavily by the Web. 
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do you know anything about emma trosse? she was a sexologist that wrote about homosexuality in the late 1800s. she apparently identified as 'asensual' while being married to a man, which honestly seems better fitting than asexual in that context because it doesn't frame it as a sexual orientation. people use her as an argument that it's a long recognised orientation though which is questionable i guess.
It's hard to find decent info on her in relation to this ask. A lot of the stuff talks about her life or that she coined the term asensual but beyond that don't have anything else.
From what I gather, asensual is pretty close to the basic idea of asexual now. But framing it as a boundary in a relationship rather than a sexual orientation. It's not about lacking attraction, but rather not desiring or wanting that type of affection.
I think if the split attraction model is going to keep getting used, the idea of asexuality would be more of an add on term to your sexial orientation. Without the SAM tho, its a seperate orientation that means you hold no romantic or sexual attraction to anyone. My FAQ goes into more depth for that.
As for that last point. Asexuality as a concept does actually go back to 1869 with the term monosexual which just meant people who only masterbate and don't date. 1896 you get anesthesia sexual or no sexual desire. The actual term asexuality was used in 1969 in the satanic bible and the asexual manifesto in 1972 (the first defining it as no sexual desire and the later defining it as a political statement wanting to make a point that women don't need relationships to be full filled).
Honestly... The idea of asexuality HAS been around a long time. There have always been people who don't find anyone attractive. The terms used and how it's looked have always been different. If you find men attractive and want to date them, but aren't comfortable with sex, I'd still just say you're into men. Just cuz you have a boundary doesn't make you any different from someone with a different boundary. You both like men.
But that's where things get muddled in the history of the term and concept of asexuality throughout history. Sometimes it's no attraction at all, sometimes it's specifically about the desire for sex itself. And the Split Attraction Model itself is DEFINITELY a newer concept. As is all the gray ace shit like demisexual and what not. The SAM is what is new, not so much the idea of asexuality. And I think that's important in discussing the term.
My exact opinions on all of that can be found in my FAQ, but this post is getting long. So I'm gonna end it here. I hope that is what you were looking for. Thanks!!
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isabellalinton · 5 months ago
I think Weir sort of mentioned this (in a tangent) in an article you mentioned fairly recently, of women in modern (I guess 2000s to current) period dramas having anachronistic-to-the-point-of-ridiculous costumes, generally to be more sexually appealing to a modern audience. Whilst Weir is about the last person I would want to expound upon this, would you mind explain your thoughts on the matter? I don't want to take up your time though
uhhh, so this is probably going to be a bit convoluted but bear with me!
so, you can go one of two ways with costuming period dramas - either you try to dress everyone as accurately as you can (such as Wolf Hall - although it didn’t always succeed, it made the attempt of producing the major costumes the way they would’ve been made historically (ctrl + f  "original practice"), Titanic, Crimson Peak, or the recent adaptation of Emma), which can be difficult because of budget, time-frame, how certain costumes/fabrics will read on camera, accessibility for the actors. OR you can intentionally and stylistically deviate from historical accuracy, either to avoid the aforementioned difficulties, or for some stylistic reason specific to the film (from things like The Favourite, which used pretty accurate silhouettes, with inaccurate fabrics/colours like denim; to something like Marie Antoinette, which built off the shared/blended ideas of opulence and feminity in both pre-Revolution French aesthetics and modern, 2000s aesthetics; to something like A Knight’s Tale, where the film is more a Rocky parody that plays with the literary genre of courtly love, thus the inspiration for the costuming is more ‘70s (and 80s?) rock and roll’ than medieval, European fashion: “the fashions embody the hip, modern edge of this timeless tale of ambition, unbreakable drive and the invincible spirit of youth” (production notes), "Brian and I were inspired a great deal by the look of the Rolling Stones on their 1972 tour" (costume designer Caroline Harris). Not every film deviates for stylistic reasons - sometimes it appears to be simply an error in the design, maybe due to a lack of research or budget (for example, The Other Boleyn Girl, Enola Holmes, or the most recent Little Women adaptation which is full of inaccuracies) - and sometimes it happens because the film/show simply has no interest in sticking to historical accuracy (such as Bridgerton). 
(also there’s the issue of things like stage productions - like, compare anything hosted at The Globe, to something like the stage production of Wolf Hall, to Six: The Musical. But for the sake of simplicity, I’m focusing on tv and film).
so I don’t mind anachronistic costuming; I often quite like anachronistic costuming. I think it’s a very hard ask to demand of a production to costume its cast fully accurately, and inaccuracies can serve the film. A Knight’s Tale is, for example, one of my all-time favourite films - and part of that is in how consistent the styling of the film is, from the tone to the score to the costuming. So I don’t think that inaccurate costuming is, inherently, a problem. Especially since, like, what does ‘accuracy’ mean, exactly? And why should it be so important? The gowns that ‘look’ accurate, often aren’t actually made and fitted accurately (people praise the costumes in The Other Boleyn Girl as accurate, despite there being a distinct lack of proper stays & chemises; The Borgias put the women in what look like consistent and accurate gamurras, but I’m pretty sure the fabric choices are off iiirc?) And the gowns that don’t ‘look’ accurate can still often generate a significant emotional response from the audience. Nobody thinks Moulin Rouge is accurate, but the costuming works for the film’s unique tone; likewise, historically, Daphne Bridgerton would look objectively absurd going for a morning stroll outside in a machine embroidered evening gown, but to a modern audience, she looks wealthy and beautiful and romantic, as she is intended to.
But, in many cases - and I do think the 2000s were especially problematic for this - certain period dramas lacked the consistency that justifies those inaccuracies. And this is partially excusable (again, budget) but also I think it perhaps also speaks to a trend in wanting leading ladies to still be attractive to the audience (consider, also, the casting choices, and hair & make-up). I also think the argument of ‘women in ridiculous costumes’ really centers around specific genres - the period drama, as a whole, is considered ‘feminine’ and often “slushy” (to use Hilary Mantel’s terminology), but specifically romantic dramas centred around Important Women or relationships (what Susan Bordo calls “soap-opera drama” and what David Starkey calls “wife-centred, ‘feminised’ history”) - and I think, therefore, that there’s something to be said for these productions being inherently less ‘intellectual’. Thus, they’re visually unchallenging.
So when Weir says this:
“In the TV series The Tudors (2007-2010), Mary Boleyn (Perdita Weeks) appears in six episodes. From the moment you see the eighteenth-century coach in the opening shots of the series, you know that historical integrity is going to be an issue. Hopeless chronology, dated costumes and unforgivable factual errors spoil a series that is often well-acted by a strong cast. The Tudors inhabits a world of its own: only occasionally do you get a sense of Tudor England. Many of the female characters, like Mary, look like modern fashion models with breast implants and teased hair.”
(firstly I’m not about to be lectured on ‘historical integrity’ from a woman either so bankrupt of integrity as to consciously lie about Anne of Cleves having a secret bastard child, OR so intellectually lacking that she somehow genuinely believed this to be a real thing that really happened. “Tendentious horseshit”, indeed.)
she kind of fails to really acknowledge the wider issue. Objectification, and being attractive, is part of the woman’s role in The Tudors (where women are constantly getting naked, and used as sex objects, as well as other period dramas. Also, whilst the issue should be that the production felt the need to sexualise the female cast, Weir goes out of her way to body-shame them whilst she does it, not because of a cultural incentive for women to look a certain way, but because those silly actresses and models actually submitted to that standard! (As an aside, there’s literally nothing wrong with getting breast implants/body modifications). At the root of it, though, she raises a good point. There is a noted trend of period dramas putting the women in significantly less accurate costuming than their male co-stars. They also tend to make the period costuming a part of the text, almost exclusively for women. Actresses get scenes of them being tightlaced into corsets, or complaining about the heat/inability to breathe/lack of maneuverability (even when fashion historians and re-enactors repeatedly point out that none of these things would be real issues for historical women) but we see very little commentary on the same for men. Men barely seem to think about it, and if they do, it’s to illustrate that they are distinctly un-masculine, (for example: we NEVER see men in corsets - when we know men, historically, did wear them, along with many other garments we now consider to be ‘feminine’.) If they aren’t being sexualised, women have to conform to a (third-wave, ignoring systemic causes) modern, and thus anachronistic, idea of feminism, or arguably postfeminism (of assuming an equality that does not exist). And, in many cases, women in period dramas have to be both: Anne Boleyn, in The Tudors, wears low-cut, revealing gowns that often emphasise her breasts to the point of showing off her nipples, with long, flowing locks to maximise her beauty - and is often naked, or stripped down to her undergarments - but she’s also a #GirlBoss who gets sassy one-liners where she puts Henry/Cromwell/her father in their place! She’s sexualised to conform to the male gaze but, like, in an empowered way!
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You also see this with the trope of the tomboy-ish/’feminist’ character in period dramas, eschewing accurate clothing because their social values demand it. Belle in the live-action Beauty and the Beast foregoes period-accurate shoes and stays because Emma ‘tax dodger’ Watson “refused to wear a corset” because of the popular misunderstanding of the function of the corset. And, as a result, her costumes look like failed Disneybound attempts of what a woman in 1700′s France would wear. She’s brainy! She doesn’t need breast and back supporting undergarments! (didn’t anyone tell Emma/Belle that bra-burning is SO 20th century...)
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On other occasions, women are slut-shamed by the narrative - they are put in revealing clothes to intentionally illustrate that they are sexually promiscuous (again, Anne Boleyn in The Spanish Princess literally strips off in front of Henry VIII). Katherine Howard in The Tudors wears costumes that expose more skin than a Tudor accurate dress would ever do, all to illustrate that she is a sulty, sexy young girl - hot but, ultimately, stupid, so she had it coming!
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So I think it says a lot about modern ideas of women - the more obvious misogyny of not allowing women to exist outside of the parameters of the male gaze. But also the idea that women CAN sexualise themselves, that they’ve reclaimed that agency, and it’s feminist to do so. So actresses’ ability to be period-accurate being limited by the requirement to be sexually attractive (and also conforming to gender standards of the 21st century) is definitely a trend. Because, ultimately, whilst these period pieces might be pretending to be set in, say, the medieval period, or the Tudor period, they’re modern productions, made in the 21st century, for a 21st-century audience.  
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onegingertoomanyfandoms · 3 months ago
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Because I’m the biggest nerd ever and because I find these kinds of things fun and fascinating I present to you now:
Glee Cast in birth date order (plus ages*)
Jane Lynch (Sue Sylvester)- July 14, 1960 [60]
Iqbal Theba (Principal Figgins)- Dec 20, 1963 [57]
Dot-Marie Jones (Sheldon Beiste)- Jan 4,1964 [57]
Romy Rosemont (Carole Hudson)- Oct 28, 1964 [56]
Mike O’Malley (Burt Hummel)- Oct 31, 1966 [54]
Kristen Chenoweth (April Rhodes)- July 24, 1968 [52]
Idina Menzel (Shelby Corcoran)- May 30, 1971 [50]
Jessalyn Gilsig (Terri Schuester)- Nov 30, 1971 [49]
Gwyneth Paltrow (Holly Holliday)- Sep 27, 1972 [48]
Matthew Morrison (Will Schuester) - Oct 30, 1978 [42]
Jayma Mays (Emma Pillsbury)- July 16, 1979 [41]
Harry Shum Jr. (Mike Chang)- April 28, 1982 [39]
Cory Monteith (Finn Hudson)- May 11, 1982 [31**]
Mark Salling (Noah Puckerman)- Aug 17, 1982 [35**]
Josh Sussmann (Jacob Ben Israel)- Dec 30, 1983 [37]
Jonathan Groff (Jesse St. James)- Mar 26, 1985 [36]
Vanessa Lengies (Sugar Motta)- July 21, 1985 [35]
Max Adler (Dave Karovsky)- Jan 17, 1986 [35]
Becca Tobin (Kitty Wilde)- Jan 18, 1986 [35]
Amber Riley (Mercedes Jones)- Feb 15, 1986 [35]
Dean Geyer (Brody Weston)- Mar 20, 1986 [35]
Jenna Ushkowitz (Tina Cohen-Chang)- Apr 28, 1986 [35]
Dianna Agron (Quinn Fabray)- Apr 30, 1986 [35]
Lea Michele (Rachel Berry)- Aug 29, 1986 [34]
Ashley Fink (Lauren Zizes)- Nov 20, 1986 [34]
Naya Rivera (Santana Lopez)- January 12, 1987 [33**]
Heather Morris (Brittany S. Pierce)- Feb 1, 1987 [34]
Darren Criss (Blaine Anderson)- Feb 5, 1987 [34]
Kevin McHale (Artie Abrams)- Jun 14, 1988 [33]
Melissa Benoist (Marley Rose)- Oct 4, 1988 [32]
Chord Overstreet (Sam Evans)- Feb 17, 1989 [32]
Dijon Talton (Matt Rutherford)- Sep 17, 1989 [31]
Grant Gustin (Sebastian Smythe)- Jan 14, 1990 [31]
Lauren Potter (Becky Jackson)- May 10, 1990 [31]
Chris Colfer (Kurt Hummel)- May 27, 1990 [31]
Samuel Larsen (Joe Hart)- Aug 28, 1991 [29]
Alex Newell (Unique Adams)- Aug 20, 1992 [28]
Blake Jenner (Ryder Lynn)- Aug 27, 1992 [28]
Damian McGinty (Rory Flanagan)- Sep 9, 1992 [28]
Jacob Artist (Jake Puckerman)- Oct 17, 1992 [28]
*- at time of writing (6-16-2021)
**- age at time of passing
And for an extra bit of nerd I give you:
Star Signs of the Glee Cast:
Aries (Mar 21- Apr 19)
Jonathan Groff
Taurus (Apr 20-May 20)
Harry Shum, Jr., Cory Monteith, Jenna Ushkowitz, Dianna Agron, Lauren Potter
Gemini (May 21- Jun 20)
Idina Menzel, Kevin McHale, Chris Colfer
Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)
Jane Lynch, Jayma Mays, Vanessa Lengies,
Leo (Jul 23-Aug 22)
Kristen Chenoweth, Mark Salling, Alex Newell
Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)
Lea Michele, Dijon Talton, Samuel Larsen, Blake Jenner, Damian McGinty
Libra (Sep 23-Oct 22)
Gwyneth Paltrow, Melissa Benoist, Jacob Artist
Scorpio (Oct 23-Nov 21)
Romy Rosemont, Mike O’Malley, Matthew Morrison, Ashley Fink
Sagittarius (Nov 22-Dec 21)
Iqbal Theba, Jessalyn Gilsig
Capricorn (Dec 22-Jan 19)
Dot-Marie Jones, Josh Sussman, Max Adler, Becca Tobin, Naya Rivera, Grant Gustin
Aquarius (Jan 20-Feb 18)
Amber Riley, Heather Morris, Darren Criss, Chord Overstreet
Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20)
Dean Geyer
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naivesilver · 3 months ago
you know what? Whilst we're on the topic of less likeable pinocchio characters, how about top 5 adaptations of Geppetto as well?
God we're really wading into controversial waters now aren't we
Thank you! I promise less salt in this than what I poured in the Fairy ask (as if it were hard to avoid reaching such a point, the only thing saltier than that answer was probably the Dead Sea)
Ask me my top 5 anything
So the thing with Geppetto is that I don't...necessarily hate him, per se. I still think he'll be responsible for a good chunk of Pinocchio's childhood trauma in the years to come, but his mistakes are at least understandable and human, not necessarily brought by malice. In the hands of the right actor (and the right director, obviously) he can become a great asset to the story, so this list is, for once, not very snarky and actually kind of emotional in some sections.
1)Pinocchio (2019)
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Please...he's trying so hard...This Geppetto isn't any more ready to have a son than his book counterpart is, but his reaction to it is so sweet I can forgive the more romanticized parts of those scenes. Roberto Benigni truly nailed the "I'm trying to be stern but I can't physically say no to this boy" facial expressions.
He's doing his best, okay? He stayed around to check if Pinocchio had gone to school! He was so happy! I'm still crying about him going up to Cherry like "say good morning Pinocchio" and Pinocchio being the sweetest little bastard with his "good morning :D". This movie deserved way more Oscars than it was nominated for, I said what I said.
2) Le Avventure di Pinocchio (1972)
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On the other side of the spectrum we have...this sassy fucker.
God, I love him. Nino Manfredi really shows us a side of this man that I'd like to see more often. He's pissed off, constantly and arguably rightfully so, and the fact that he loves his son to bits doesn't mean he wasn't done with parenting from minute one of having to feed and educate that child. Have you ever tried to put clothes on a kid that's opposing you at every move? Because I have, and it's exactly as hard as it's depicted here!
Also, there is only one way to correctly portray Master Cherry, and it's by showing the snarky, bothersome kind of friendship he has with Geppetto. The 2009 miniseries tried, but they botched it up after a while: this one, instead, gives the exact vibes I was looking for, which is "Laurel and Hardy meets Estragon and Vladimir meets old married couple in a 90s sitcom". 10/10 would watch on an insomnia night again.
(Also it took me a trip to the kitchen mid-making this post to remember that he canonically banged the Fairy pre-fairydom. Jesus Christ. A man ahead of his time.)
3) Once Upon A Time
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How hilarious is it that both Blue and Archie landed themselves a spot in my "worst 5 of their kind" rankings, but this man gets so high a rating instead? The magic of OUAT, indeed.
Listen. I know. He helped ruin Emma's life. I am painfully aware of it. But get this...Who's doing it like him? This show is all about the doings and undoings of princesses and queens and wizards and ice cream sellers with Medea syndrome, and then in comes this man, a no name, really, who puts his foot down and says no. He changes the course of history for his son. All my criticisms on his character get blown away every time I remember the guts it must have taken, and besides, some of them don't even exist in this version, as it shows exactly what kind of hypocrisy is innate to the adults in Pinocchio's story.
Also, never forget that he tried to unclog a mine shaft by dropping dynamite in it while his best friend and a ten year old were STILL IN THERE. Truly the best decision a character ever made in seven seasons of this fuckery.
4) Pinocchio (2012)
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Perpetually lost in a state of daydreaming, just like his son, but very, very kind and sweet. Took the time to explain to Pinocchio what a school was and what would be expected of him, and we even get an hint of his past and of his experience as a child as well as a father.
Also, the true reason why I put him in here - did you know that in the Italian version he and Pinocchio are dubbed by a father and son duo? I tear up a bit every time I get reminded of that. This poor inconsolable boy is calling for his papa both in real life and in the cinematic immersion.
5) Piccolino No Bouken
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He's only in this list because I pity him immensely. One of the very few not to commit the sin of immediately sending his son to school, instead keeping the boy around for a while, taking care of him and showing him how the world worked, and for what? The Fairy, may she bump facefirst against a cactus, gaslit gatekept girlbossed her way into his and Pinocchio's life and ruined it from start to finish. Pure evil, I'll tell you that.
Also he's so lost and frail I can't rage against him properly without feeling guilty. Like we say here, it'd be like shooting at the Red Cross.
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anne-the-quene · 7 months ago
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Anne Boleyn on Stage and Screen
Giuditta Pasta in the Teatro Carcano‘s production of the opera Anna Bolena (this was the original production of this opera and the title role was written specifically for her voice) — 1830
Apollonia Bertucca in the New York premiere of Anna Bolena — 1850
Violet Vanbrugh in the Lyecum Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 1892
Clara Kimball Young in a short film about Cardinal Wolsey — 1912
Henny Porten in the film Anna Boleyn — 1920
Merle Oberon in the film The Private Life of Henry VIII — 1933
Vivien Leigh in the Open Air Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 1936
Sara Scuderi in Gran Teatre del Liceu‘s production of Anna Bolena — 1947
Joyce Redman in the Broadway production of Anne of the Thousand Days — 1949
Elaine Stewart in the film Young Bess — 1953
Maria Callas in La Scala’s production of Anna Bolena — 1957
Gloria Davy in the American Opera Society’s production of Anna Bolena — 1957
Leyla Gencer in Anna Bolena — 1965
Vanessa Redgrave in the film A Man For All Seasons — 1966
Genevieve Bujold in the film Anne of the Thousand Days — 1969
Dorothy Tutin in the BBC miniseries The Six Wives of Henry VIII — 1970
Charlotte Rampling in the film Henry VIII and His Six Wives — 1972
Beverly Sills in the New York City Opera’s production of Anna Bolena - 1973
Marisa Galvany in the New York City Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 1974
Barbara Kellerman in the BBC production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 1979
Joan Sutherland in the San Francisco Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 1984
Oona Kirsch in the film God’s Outlaw — 1986
Edita Gruberová in Anna Bolena — 1994
Julia Marsen in the documentary The Six Wives of Henry VIII — 2001
Jodhi May in the BBC TV movie The Other Boleyn Girl — 2003
Helena Bonham Carter in the ITV TV movie Henry VIII — 2003
An uncredited actress in the History Happened Here segment Henry VIII & Anne Boleyn — 2007
Mariella Devia in Anna Bolena — 2007
Natalie Dormer in the Showtime series The Tudors — 2007-2008, 2010
Natalie Portman in the film The Other Boleyn Girl — 2008
Karen Peakes in the Folger Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 2010
Miranda Raison in Howard Brenton’s play Anne Boleyn — 2010
Hasmik Papian in the Dallas Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 2010
Miranda Raison in the Globe Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 2010
Anna Netrebko in the Vienna State Opera’s and Metropolitan Opera’s productions of Anna Bolena — 2011
Emma Connell in the documentary Henry & Anne: The Lovers Who Changed History — 2011
Keri Alkema in the Minnesota Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 2012
Jo Herbert in the UK tour of Howard Brenton’s Anne Boleyn — 2012
Rochelle Hart in the Opera Seria UK’s production of Anna Bolena — 2012
Anna Jullienne in the Auckland Theatre Company’s production of Howard Brenton’s Anne Boleyn — 2013
Serena Farncocchia in the Welsh National Opera’s production of Anna Bolena — 2013
Fleur Keith in the play Fallen in Love: The Secret Heart of Anne Boleyn performed at the Tower of London — 2013
Tara Breathnach in the documentary The Last Days of Anne Boleyn — 2013
Kathryn Myles in the Actors Shakespeare Project’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry VIII — 2013-2014
Miou Kazune in the Japanese musical Lady Bess — 2014-2017
Sondra Radvanovsky in several productions of Anna Bolena including at The Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Metropolitan Opera, among others — 2014-2015
Claire Foy in the BBC miniseries Wolf Hall — 2015
Harriet Green in the documentary Inside the Court of Henry VIII — 2015
Lydia Leonard in both the West End and Broadway productions of Wolf Hall Parts One & Two — 2015
An unknown actress in the Spanish TV series Carlos, rey emperador — 2015
Claire Cooper in the documentary Six Wives with Lucy Worsley (also known as Secrets of the Six Wives) — 2016
Fleur Keith in the short film I Am Henry — 2016
Harriet Green in the documentary The Six Queens of Henry VIII (also known as Henry VIII and His Six Wives) — 2016; Archive footage of Green in this documentary was also featured in the documentary series Elizabeth I — 2017
Krystin Pellerin in the CW series Reign, season 3 episode “To the Death” — 2016
Gemma Whalen in an episode of the CBBC series Horrible Histories — 2017
Ashleigh Weir in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival production of the musical Six — 2017
Christina Modestou in the Off-West End production of Six — 2017
Millie O’Connell in the original West End production of Six — 2018-2019
Angela Meade in several productions of Anna Bolena throughout the years, most recently in ABAO Bilbao’s production — 2019
Hazel Karooma-Brooker in the Norwegian Cruise Line production of Six — 2019
An uncredited actress in the Starz series The Spanish Princess, season 1 episode “All Is Lost” — 2019
Andrea Macasaet in the North American tour and original Broadway productions of Six — 2019-2020
Courtney Bowman in the West End production of Six — 2019-2020
Maddison Bulleyment in the UK tour of Six — 2019-2020
Kala Gare in the Australian tour of Six — 2020
Alice Nokes in The Spanish Princess part 2 — 2020
Jodie Turner-Smith in the Channel 5 miniseries Anne Boleyn — 2021
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thebossofcute · a month ago
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Every Frank Churchill, Ranked and Rated
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"From the expense of the child, however, [Mr. Weston] was soon relieved. The boy had, with the additional softening claim of a lingering illness of his mother's, been the means of a sort of reconciliation [Between the Westons and the Churchills of Enscombe]; and Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, having no children of their own, nor any other young creature of equal kindred to care for, offered to take the whole charge of little Frank soon after her decease...
“Mr. Frank Churchill was one of the boasts of Highbury, and a lively curiosity to see him prevailed, though the compliment was so little returned that he had never been there in his life. His coming to visit his father had often been talked of but never achieved. –Emma, Chapter 2
“…he was a very good looking young man; height, air, address, all were unexceptionable, and his countenance had a great deal of the spirit and liveliness of his father’s; he looked quick and sensible. [Emma] felt immediately that she would like him; and there was a well-bred ease of manner, and a readiness to talk, which convinced her that he came intending to be acquainted with her, and that acquainted they soon must be.” –Emma, Chapter 23
Number 5: 2020
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Portrayed by: Callum Turner
Age at time of filming: 29
Honestly it took me way longer to decide this than it should have, really—Callum turner is the worst Frank Churchill. And he had some stiff competition, but then I realized, that no opposition could be as stiff as Callum Turner’s attempts at being witty or charming in this adaptation.
Stylistically, on the bright side, Frank’s costumes (baggy trousers notwithstanding) are pretty good, but since every man in this film dresses like an all-out dandy, that’s not terribly impressive. His haircut, though acceptable for the period, isn’t terribly flattering on the actor.
There’s a pervasive ominous air whenever Frank appears in a scene. Perhaps that could be appropriate in his later scenes, Box Hill and such, but it’s not really called for from the moment he shows up. Frank is supposed to charm everyone in Highbury with his energy and charm, while in this adaptation he just… corners Emma in a shadowy nook in Ford’s and speaks to her in a low voice; it reads as very sexualized to me, and not in a fresh, fun way.
2020’s Frank Churchill has an unpleasant greasy film coating him that isn’t redeemed by, say, a stunning performance or nuanced direction. Callum Turner is a perfectly capable actor, but he’s not terribly compelling as Frank; his character in this movie is severely underdeveloped, so the emphasis on Frank’s disgruntlement doesn’t really work in favor of the story being told—it just makes him even less likeable, and in fact, it leaves a lot of strings dangling for someone who’s not as familiar with the story.
Rating: 1/5 London haircuts
Number 4: 1996/97 (ITV)
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Portrayed by: Raymond Coulthard
Age at time of filming: 28
The aforementioned stiff competition. Perhaps the above picture is a clue as to why 1997’s Frank Churchill is a big no for me. In fact, the line between number 4 and number 5 in this ranking list is razor thin. But whereas 2020’s Frank has a vague air of unpleasantness (said vagueness being the reason he ranks lower—I think the writers/directors didn’t understand the purpose of his character or didn’t know what to do with him,) 1997’s has a one I think I can put my finger on.
Of course what I’m about to say is all conjecture, but my theory (apart from either Raymond Coulthard’s performance or the direction, or the writing, I’m not sure which) on why this Frank Churchill is so bad is this: I think Andrew Davies really wanted Emma to have a rakish villain in the manner of George Wickham or John Willoughby, because that’s the vibe this Frank gives me. And Frank is many things, but he’s not a rake.
As with many things in this version, I believe Davies decided “sex up” Frank in the subtext (something I believe the 2020 version also tried to do with their Frank, without much greater success.) For more information, see the above picture. Granted that’s taken from a fantasy sequence Emma has of meeting Frank, but it’s not too far off from his characterization elsewhere in the movie. At the end of the film, Davies changes his praising the beauty Jane’s dark hair, to talking about the smoothness of her skin. I’ve already ranted about that, but not only is this very sexual, it’s creepy as fuck, especially considering he says all this while standing behind Emma (much like Frank in Ford’s in the 2020 version).
At the end of the day, I think Raymond Coulthard and this characterization would be welcome as Willoughby, or Wickham or even Henry Crawford, but as Frank Churchill? No. Just. No.
Rating: 2/5 London haircuts
Number 3: 1996 (Miramax)
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Portrayed by: Ewan McGregor
Age at time of filming: 25
After those two it’s rather nice to find myself running to the comforting arms (and terrible wig) of Ewan McGregor.
While Ewan doesn’t think much of his performance in this film, I think he did a perfectly fine job. I’ve already touched on this adaptation’s deficiencies tackling the complexities of this story and its characters, and Frank may suffer from that the most.
That said, I think, if Emma 2020 has showed us anything about Frank, it’s that if you don’t have the room to develop Frank’s character, and deficiencies thereof, it’s better for the story and the viewer that you don’t. I don’t necessarily think that this is something that the makers of the 1996 Emma thought about and aimed for, I think it’s just a side-effect of the warm, buttery atmosphere they wanted for the movie, but thank goodness they did.
1996’s Frank Churchill is a bit safe, his chemistry with Polly Walker’s Jane is lol, but at least he’s believable as the kind of person a village would shocked over when he finally makes his secret engagement public.
Rating: 3/5 London Haircuts (This one actually needs it)
Number 2: 1972
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Portrayed by: Robert East
Age at time of filming: 29
It’s strange to think that before 2009 the definitive Frank Churchill was Prince Harry from Blackadder, but that’s just how it was.
We’ve explored two examples of Frank being under-written(one disastrous, one fine), and one of him being… mis-written. While Emma 1972 is far from a masterpiece in terms of both acting and characterization, one of the bright spots was Robert East as Frank Churchill. He was charming, smarmy, but not too sleazy, and even with the on-cue stagey 70’s BBC acting, he still manages to carry Frank’s agitation and ill humors in a way that feels neither out of place or (too) unnatural.
Of course it’s not a sophisticated interpretation, but at least the writers didn’t mess around with his character or storyline. He has room to move around (more so than in 1996 or 2020) and you get to see every side of his character, from the merely playful to the disappointingly immature.
Rating: 3 1/2 /5 London haircuts
Number 1: 2009
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Portrayed by: Rupert Evans
Age at time of filming: 32
While 1972 managed to give Frank room to move as a character (something NONE of the other adaptations already discussed did) it didn’t quite dig into his character’s significance in Emma’s story. Enter Emma 2009—the only truly complete portrayal of Frank Churchill’s character.
I once heard someone say that this is the only version of Emma they’ve seen that really gave them the time to actually hate Frank Churchill. I find that rather fascinating because I found plenty of other reasons to hate most other Franks; but when I think about it, I didn’t hate those other Franks because of Frank’sbehavior in the story, but because of how they were written, or… under-written.
Not only is 2009’s Frank Churchill written to be a whole, integral character in Emma’s story, but Rupert Evans is a brilliant actor who does an excellent job conveying what motivates Frank’s behavior. Frank’s dissatisfaction in his self-made situation (born primarily of a “combination of cowardice and youthful preoccupation”, as one of my mutuals put it) seethes under the surface, but only when it’s called for, and despite being the oldest Frank Churchill to date, he’s the only one who manages to convey the character’s youthful, restless energy.
Rating: 5/5 London haircuts
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If you enjoyed this, check out my other Emma ranking lists and reviews here.
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scotianostra · 5 months ago
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Happy 70th Musician Birthday Dougie Thomson.
Born Douglas Campbell Thomson on March 24th, 1951 in Glasgow and raised in the Rutherglen area of the same city. Dougie was a member of the so-called Supertramp 'classic lineup' playing bass guitar from 1973 until Supertramp's initial break-up in 1988.
Dougie's musical career began in August 1969 when he joined a local Glaswegian band "The Beings". Then in September of 1971 Dougie, joins The Alan Bown Set replacing Andy Brown and, as fate has it, first worked with future Supertramp bandmate John Helliwell briefly. In February of 1972, Dougie tried out for Supertramp and ended up playing with the band at several gigs as a temporary stand-in. In 1973, Dougie joined Supertramp as bass player and also helped take over the business management along with Dave Margereson. He also persuaded John Helliwell into joining the band.
Dougie would play with Supertramp on its Crime of the Century, Crisis? What Crisis?, Even in the Quietest Moments, Breakfast in America, Paris, ...Famous Last Words..., Brother Where You Bound and Free as a Bird albums.
After Supertramp initially disbanded in 1988, Dougie became a publisher in the music business creating Trinity publishing and works with a management company in Chicago, Illinois. He didn't participate in Supertramp's regrouping in 1997 for the album Some Things Never Change.
He is also an avid sailor owning a number of yachts.
Thomson has four children, Laura, James, Kyle and Emma, Kyle played professional football, both in the US and at Morton.
I do like Supertramp, but only ever owned one of their albums,...Famous Last Words..., and that is only because I won it in a competition on Radio Forth. I must admit I thought the group were American, and it is only in the past few years that I found out they were a "Brit" band
Who remembers The Old Grey Whistle Test? Here are Supertramp performing one of their hits on the show.
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