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#english history
theladyelizabeth · 2 days ago
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[The Lady Elizabeth] now lives upon this settlement from her father, but is always in debt, and would be much more so did she not steadily restrain herself to avoid any increase of the Queen's hatred and anger, either by increasing the number of gentlemen and servants of her household, or by adding to her expenditure in any other way; and here I may add that there is not a lord or gentleman in the kingdom who has failed, and continues endeavouring, to enter her service himself or to place one of his sons or brothers in it, such being the love and affection borne her. When requested to take servants she always excuses herself on account of the straits and poverty in which she is kept, and by this astute and judicious apology she adroitly incites a tacit compassion for herself and consequently yet greater affection, as it seems strange and vexatious to everybody that being the daughter of a King she should be treated and acknowledged so sparingly. Since Wyatt's rebellion she may be said never to have been at liberty, for although she is allowed to live at a house of hers called Hatfield, 12 miles from London, the Queen has nevertheless many spies and guards in the neighbourhood who keep strict watch on all persons passing to and fro, nor is any thing said or done that is not immediately reported to the Queen, so she is obliged to act very cautiously.
Giovanni Michiel to the Venitian Senate
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falconqueen · a month ago
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1 June 1533 • The Coronation of Anne Boleyn
The elite of the land had taken Anne as queen in the sight of God, and under the most solemn and hallowed sanctions of Holy Church. The mystique of monarchy now belonged to Anne Boleyn. Only death could take it way. • Eric Ives
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catherinesvalois · 7 months ago
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Tudor Fashion: French Hoods
Okay, we’re back with more Tudor headwear that is either suspiciously missing in dramas depicting the Tudor era, or are not done well. Today we’re looking at French Hoods! 
French Hoods are usually shown as little more than headbands in costume dramas, but like headdresses of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, headdresses were meant to cover the hair for cleanliness and for modesty. The French Hood was no different. Attached to the band was a piece of cloth that covered one’s hair in the back. As to how much hair this headdress covered, the French Hood left more hair exposed in the front than headdresses like the Gable Hood, but it still covered most of one’s hair.
This style is obviously French (hence the name), but it’s origins in England during the Tudor period is less clear. There are portraits of Katherine of Aragon wearing a French Hood in a 1520 portrait, Mary Tudor (Henry VIII’s sister) is said to have brought it back from France from her brief time as consort to King Louis XII of France, and Anne Boleyn is more frequently credited to making this style popular in England after she spent 9 years in the courts of Queen Margaret of Austria and Queen Claude of France where this style was popular as well. 
Whichever way this fashion came to England, it was very fashionable. Over the years and into Elizabethan times, a form of this style was still being worn, but the height of the band was a lot shorter.
In this post I wanted to pay homage to my girls Anne Boleyn, Katherine Howard, and Elizabeth Tudor who while being family to each other, liked to wear this fashion and looked good doing it.
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cafeinevitable · 3 months ago
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The Crooked House of Windsor
428 year old house that has a basement with a secret tunnel to the famous Windsor Castle. The clandestine tunnel was allegedly used for rendezvous between Charles ll and his mistress Nell Gwyn.
ph. Tim Holt
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catherineofbraganza · 7 months ago
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✧ “The queen’s final years were lonely and sad; the Spanish ambassador kept her informed of outside events and smuggled letters to her daughter, but she was often ill and at prayer. The wrongs she had suffered from Henry filled her with sadness rather than anger. Perhaps she was inspired by her motto, Humble and Loyal, for that is how she remained.” - Marilee Hanson
requested by anonymous
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encyclopedia-amazonica · 3 months ago
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Nicolaa de la Haye - Sheriff of Lincoln
Nicolaa (also sometimes spelled Nicola of Nicholaa) was born around 1160. She was the daughter of the hereditary castellan and sheriff of Lincoln, England. Since her father had no male heir, she inherited both offices when he died. Her first husband died in 1178 and she married a second time to Gerard de Camville in the late 1180s and gave birth to two sons. 
Though her husband governed her possessions at that time, Nicolaa showed an indomitable spirit. The couple was involved in a violent dispute between the royal chancellor and the future King John in 1191 during King Richard I’s absence on the Third Crusade. In spring 1191, Gerard pledged himself to John and as a result, Nicolaa found herself besieged in Lincoln’s castle during her husband’s absence.
According to Richard of Devizes, Nicolaa “not thinking about anything womanly, defended … [Lincoln] castle manfully” against chancellor William de Longchamp’s forces. She held for a month until he lifted the siege. When Richard I went back to England in 1194, Nicolaa and her husband were punished for their disloyalty and had to win back the royal favor.
Gerard died in 1215 and Nicolaa assumed both roles of castellan and sheriff in her own right. It was unusual, though not unheard off, for a woman to hold an office with military responsibilities. Some women indeed served as sheriffs during the 13th century. Ela Longespée (1244-1276) was for instance sheriff of Wiltshire and Isabella de Clifford and Idonea de Leyburn were two sisters who served as joint sheriffs of Westmorland under Edward I.
In the wake of the conflict between king John and his barons, she defended Lincoln castle again in 1216. Nicolaa met with king John the same year and went out with the keys of the castle and asked to be removed from the office arguing that: “she was a woman of great age and had endured many labours and anxieties in the […] castle and was not able to endure such [burdens] any longer”. The king, however, asked her to keep the castle. Nicolaa was also later rewarded with additional properties. 
Her skills were once again put to the test in 1217. Nicolaa commanded the royalist garrison in Lincoln and was besieged by a rebel army. Her allies praised her from being a “worthy lady” deserving of god’s protection in “body and soul” while her foes said that she was a “a very cunning, bad-hearted and vigorous old woman”. Finally, a royalist army came to help this “matron who defended herself so manfully”, as wrote Walter of Coventry. Nicolaa’s efforts has helped to secure a decisive royalist victory and to protect the crown. 
Nicolaa was afterward relieved from the office of sheriff by king Henry III, but managed to keep control of her castle and her city. She had to defend her home several times against the earl of Salisbury. She finally relinquished the castle in 1226 and died in 1230. 
Bibliography:
Balfour David, “Nicolaa de la Haye”, in: Higham Robin, Pennington Reina (ed.), Amazons to fighter pilots, biographical dictionary of military women, vol.1
Coulson Charles, Castles in medieval society
Wilkinson Louise, “Lady Nicholaa de la Haye”, 
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thetudorslovers · a month ago
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"I present unto you Queen Elizabeth, your undoubted Queen"
"Elizabeth was conducted with more celebrations to the Tower, where English queens traditionally spent their penultimate night before the coronations. Next morning, Elizabeth, escorted by the newly created knights of Bath was escorted in an open horse litter through the streets to Westminster. She was led into Westminster Hall the following morning by Bishops of Durham and Salisbury, “clothed in mantel of purple and a coronal upon her head” beneath a purple silk canopy carried by four barons of the Cinque Ports. She carried the scepter of St.Edward in her right hand and the scepter of the realm in her right. The dowager duchess of Buckingham bore Elizabeth’s train, following the queen were her mother and two of Edward’s sisters, Elizabeth, Duchess of Suffolk and lady Margaret. Cowering the path from Hall to Abbey was a carpet of ray cloth, upon which the queen walked barefoot, their way being cleared by George, duke of Clarence, Lord High Steward. Having passed into the monastery and through it’s north door, Elizabeth knelt at the high altar, then prostrated herself while the archbishop prayed. Rising, she was anointed and crowned, then led to the throne. After the royal procession left the abbey, the queen was led to her chamber, where she was dressed in purple surcoat and brought into the Hall to dine. Each time the queen took a bite, she herself removed her crown, putting it back when she was finished. To cap off the ceremonies, on 27 May, a tournament was held at Westminster. Lord Stanley won and was awarded a ruby ring from queen’s hands."
Elizabeth’s next major role, after bearing her husband’s children, was to be at his side on great state occasions and participate in the ceremonies in an appropriate manner. Documents describing several of these royal gatherings have survived from the 1470s, and show her fulfilling her duty as impeccably as any woman born into the purple. When Louis de Gruthuyse, who had sheltered King Edward during his exile in Holland, was invited to England and created Earl of Winchester in September 1472, Elizabeth, we are told, ‘ordered a great banquet . . . with abundant welfare . . . in her own chamber’. No expense was spared to make the guest of honour feel welcome and comfortable, and the afterdinner entertainment included dancing by some of the greatest in the land. When all was finished, the king and queen escorted Louis to ‘three chambers of pleasance all hanged with white silk’, and to a bed ‘of as good down as could be thought . . . as for his bed sheet and pillows they were of the Queen’s own ordinance’. Elizabeth had as much reason to be grateful to him as her husband, and her thoughtful touches complemented the greater honour only Edward could bestow.
Sources:
•Account of the coronation of Elizabeth Woodville 1465, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford
•David Baldwin's book Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower & Philippa Gregory's "The women of the cousinss war"
Dt: @edwardslovelyelizabeth ♡
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falconqueen · a month ago
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TUDOR WEEK 2021 • Day 3 | Favorite Familial Relatonship HENRY VIII and ELIZABETH I
• Madame Ysabeau is not at that table, though the King is very affectionate to her. It is said he loves her much. [1536] • She prides herself on her father and glories in him; everybody saying that she also resembles him more than the Queen does... [Giovanni Michiel, 1557]
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catherinesvalois · 8 months ago
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Tudor Fashion: Gable Hoods
Many popular shows depicting the Tudor era in English history, neglect to include the headdresses that were commonly worn during this time, but hair was usually covered and the gable hood was a fashionable headdress worn during Tudor times. 
Shaped like a gable roof, this hood was made of fabric and was a very conservative fashion as it covered most if not all of the hair. A piece of fabric flowed down the back of the head covering the hair in the back. Sometimes this type of hood would have two strips of cloth that came down from the headpiece (see bottom right picture). One could pin one or both pieces of cloth up onto the headdress (see Jane Seymour’s portrait middle left). 
This style was worn most commonly during the reigns of Catherine of Aragon and Jane Seymour. Anne Boleyn did wear a gable hood, however, she made the French Hood very popular throughout the English court during her time as consort. The gable hood was worn even during Elizabethan times, albeit by older ladies of the court, because fashions changed as they are wont to do! 
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tudors1485-1603 · 3 months ago
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“Probably commissioned by Henry VIII, this portrait shows the young princess with bright red hair, wise eyes, and a pale complexion. She appears very life-like. This is in contrast to the more renowned mask-like later portraits of Elizabeth I.” -Elizabeth I when a Princess c.1546
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catherineofbraganza · 5 months ago
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13 February 1541 ✧ Katheryn Howard is executed at nine o’clock in the morning, within the Tower of London.
An eyewitness stated: “I see the Queen and the Lady Rochford suffer within the Tower. Whose souls be with God, for they made the most godly and Christian end… [Katheryn] uttered [her] lively faith in the blood of Christ only… [she] desired all Christian people to take regard unto [her] worthy and just punishment.” After the ‘customary words of edification and confession’ were spoken, Katheryn knelt at the block—which she had practiced on the night before—and was quickly beheaded.
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artschoolglasses · 2 months ago
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Anne Boleyn, 1501/07 - May 19th, 1536
(Redbubble prints)
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vivelareine · 14 days ago
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Portrait of Maria Clementina Sobieska (1702-1735) by Francesco Trevisani
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