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#erika l. sánchez
decreation · 10 days ago
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I held my grief like two limp tulips. What am I allowed to have? I’m still   here. I’m still hers. I’m   still a body licked by stars.
“Departure” by Erika L. Sánchez
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lifeinpoetry · 5 months ago
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Admit it —  you wanted the end
with a serpentine greed. How to negotiate
that strangling mist, the fibrous
whisper?
To cease to exist and to die
are two different things entirely.
— Erika L. Sánchez, from “Six Months after Contemplating Suicide,” Lessons on Expulsion
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queercoded-villains · 7 months ago
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miss peregrine’s home for peculiar children - ransom riggs // agents of shield s1e22: the beginning of the end // the house on mango street - sandra cisneros // i am not your perfect mexican daughter - erika l. sánchez // santa fe - newsies obc // trigger warning: short fictions and disturbances - neil gaiman
bonus:
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fool-of-a-tookworm · a year ago
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JOMP Book Photo Challenge: September 2020
day 24: has a mental illness
This was a damn heavy read, but an excellent portrayal of depression, anxiety, emotional abuse, and grief - not to mention an incredible depiction of Latinx culture and the experience of being a second-generation immigrant.
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missedstations · 2 years ago
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“All of Us” - Erika L. Sánchez
Every day I am born like this— No chingues. Nothing happens for the first time. Not the neon sign that says vacant, not the men nor the jackals who resemble them. I take my bones inscribed by those who came before, and learn to court myself under a violence of stars. I prefer to become demon, what their eyes cannot. Half of me is beautiful, half of me is a promise filled with the quietest places. Every day I pray like a dog in the mirror and relish the crux of my hurt. We know Lilith ate the bones of her enemies. We know a bitch learns to love her own ghost.
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lifeinpoetry · 2 years ago
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How do you explain what you have done? With your hybrid mouth, a split tongue. 
How do you explain the warmth sucking you open, leaving you like a gutted machine? 
It is a luxury to tell a story. 
How do you explain that the words are made by more  than your wanting?
— Erika L. Sánchez, from “The Poet at Fifteen,” American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time
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thesunsetjournal · 2 years ago
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Thoughts on I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sanchez
I think this is an important story that takes a look into a family of immigrant parents and second generation American children. I could relate to many aspects of Julia’s life, such as dealing with controlling parents, wanting to leave town and become a writer, and trying to make sense of her sister’s death.
However, Julia was a hard character to like. I was annoyed most of the time by her negative observations and her judgmental attitude. Her character mostly developed at the end, which was great, but not enough to like her.
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mexican-ninjas · 2 years ago
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You shouldn’t hate yourself so much. Everyone is messed up, even when it doesn't seem like it.
I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, Erika L. Sánchez
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fool-of-a-tookworm · 11 months ago
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JOMP Book Photo Challenge: November 2020
day 07: non-white author
With the excitement of the election results I entirely forgot to post this one two days ago so here I am now pretend I did this right. I own a few more books by non-white authors but here are a bunch of them. I’ve only read 4 of the books pictured here but am so excited to get around to some of the others, especially Aristotle and Dante and We Are Not From Here.
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entrelaslagrimas · 2 years ago
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“Prefiero vivir en las calles que ser una esposa mexicana sumisa que se pasa todo el día cocinando y limpiando.”
– Yo no soy tu perfecta hija mexicana, Erika L. Sánchez
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franticallystudying · 2 years ago
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Books Read in 2019 [2/?]
I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez
“But I know I have to go far away. I love my parents, of course, and I feel guilty for wanting to leave them, but living here would be too hard. I need to grow and explore, and they won’t let me. I feel like I’m being kept under a magnifying glass.”
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mpakbaz · 2 years ago
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Nothing happens for the first time. Not the neon sign that says vacant, not the men nor the jackals who resemble them. I take my bones inscribed by those who came before, and learn to court myself under a violence of stars.
- Erika L. Sánchez (All of Us) (via)
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acehotel · 3 years ago
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Poet of the Month: Erika L. Sánchez
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Girl
In the evening hum of traffic and cicadas, you watch the ugly curtains flutter   in hot wind: Little Orphan Annie and her ridiculous flame of hair. Outside two sparrows bathe in dust, a man thrusts against a prostitute who gasps when she sees you in the window— always the little spectator, feral and plugged with squalor. Finally, you've learned to crawl inside the meat of your silence. On the way home from school, you study the factory's chemical blooms in the distance. A man with a tumor glowing from his head exits the rank motel on the corner. You crash your bike into a boy by mistake, and his porcine father screams at you until he's hoarse: Fuck you, you motherfucking bitch. Shaking, you run inside, and for months you're convinced he'll find a way to kill you. Weed lot in the muted sunset: the retarded boy pulls down his pants and a circle of kids laugh at his stiff, red penis. It looks like an alien, you whisper to your friend. The women with black eyes and wizened faces call you honey, call you sweetie. A man on the street tears the gold necklace from your mother's neck— this is how you learn that nothing will belong to you. In your mangled language, you'll count all the reasons you wish to die, the apartment bristling with roaches. Always the smell of corn oil. But what right do you have to complain about anything, with your clean socks and fat little stomach? Burnt pies from the thrift bakery you shove down your desperate gullet. What can you blame but your rootless eye? Your mind so soft and full of hysterical light. You've already learned that your body is a lie.
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Erika L. Sánchez is the daughter of Mexican immigrants. A poet, essayist, and fiction writer, she is the author of a young adult novel, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter (Knopf Books for Young Readers), a 2017 finalist for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature, and instant New York Times Best seller; and the poetry collection, Lessons on Expulsion (Graywolf), a finalist for the PEN America Open Book Award. She is a 2017-2019 Princeton Arts Fellow.
Our Poet of the Month series is curated by our friends at Poetry Society of America. The nation’s oldest poetry organization, founded in 1910, PSA’s mission is to build a larger and more diverse audience for poetry, to encourage a deeper appreciation of the vitality and breadth of poetry in the cultural conversation, to support poets through an array of programs and awards, and to place poetry at the crossroads of American life.
Girl by Erika L. Sánchez from Lessons on Expulsion. Copyright © 2017 by Erika L. Sánchez. Reprinted with permission of the author and Graywolf Press.
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lifeinpoetry · 2 years ago
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The atmosphere that year: sometimes you exist and sometimes you think you're Mrs. Dalloway. 
This is bold—existing.
— Erika L. Sánchez, from “The Poet at Fifteen.” American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time
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