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#evictions
mysharona1987 · 2 months ago
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chismosite · 12 months ago
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11.27.20. Los Angeles
LASD spent the night before thanksgiving forcibly removing a family from a state-owned home. Police arrived with military gear to remove a family who had been squatting in the vacant home. Protesters at the eviction were unable to stop the police, but they have been begun protesting outside Mayor Garcetti’s home.
A reminder that in nearly every US city, the “housing crisis” is artificially produced through collaboration among real estate developers, landlords, and Democrat & Republican politicians, carried out by overfunded police. There is no scarcity, so capitalists create an illusion of it.
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kropotkindersurprise · a year ago
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July 30 2020 - Activists against evictions in New Orleans blocked off both entrances to first city court, which handles evictions for rents less than $3000, blocking many landlords during the day who were trying to get into court to get their tenants evicted. Housing is a human right! [video]
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liberalsarecool · 3 months ago
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Landlords are scalpers. [Most are renting very outdated properties]
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vanishingsydney · 8 months ago
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Hard times ahead. The almost year long pandemic moratorium on residential rental evictions has ended. Thousands will lose secure housing - with wage subsidies also ending - unable to afford their rental, regardless of how long they might have lived there. Recently unemployed immigrant workers in particular will be hard hit. Folks will wind up on the street.
A long-laid protest street mosaic; it's been there for at least a decade. Marrickville.
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chismosite · 2 months ago
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a snapshot of the violence of U.S. housing policy at this moment of the pandemic (early sep. 2021)
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"Blackstone to Buy $7.3 Billion of AIG Housing, Insurance Assets"
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"California promised 100% rent forgiveness for struggling tenants. Most are still waiting"
U.S. economy transfers massive amount of wealth from poor to rich, triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic
6,200,000 people are behind on rent and at risk of eviction
State programs fail to stop evictions or cancel rent and are ineffective at distributing aid
The Supreme Court rules the CDC eviction moratorium unconstitutional
Private funds are buying homes en masse, including Affordable Housing
COVID-19 cases rise as evictions rise.
Every level of U.S. government, in collaboration with the private housing market, is set to kill off its poorest people to enforce its system of private housing
these points are only a handful out of the current state of housing. I can't stress how catastrophic it is and will grow to be. No amount of
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kropotkindersurprise · a year ago
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October 15, 2020 - Housing activists KC Tenants in Kansas City locked all the entrances to the eviction court, closing it for the day so no landlords can get their evictions approved. [video]
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politishaun · 3 months ago
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In pushing the CDC to renew a limited version of an expired eviction moratorium, Joe Biden was making the best of a bad situation, as he all but confessed as he announced the new action. For one thing, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, writing a concurrence in a 5-4 ruling allowing the moratorium to stand for another month, warned the administration that his patience might run out. There’s a strong possibility a lower court backed by SCOTUS will swat the measure down, just as there is a less robust possibility the courts will recognize a 60-day version of it limited to explicitly to areas with rising COVID-19 case numbers. Biden’s decision to not press for an extension was a judgement call, and when the president got serious heat from congressional Democrats for bungling the situation, he did the righteous thing by giving the benefit of the doubt to those facing evictions.
That is not, to put it mildly, how it looks to the folks at the movement-conservative flagship publication National Review. Charles C. Cooke greeted Biden’s presser by claiming the president had violated his oath of office. Cooke subsequently called, and I am not making this up, for civil disobedience against the moratorium. Not to be outdone, David Harsanyi called the moratorium extension an “unprecedented attack on the Constitution” and Phillip Klein urged Republicans to “shut down the Senate” to protest the outrage. Ryan Mills chipped in with a human-interest story about “small landlords” being unable to make ends meet by evicting impecunious tenants and getting some new ones into their properties. And Kevin Williamson rounded things out with a broader piece on abuse of “emergency” powers by presidents past and present. Several other cries of anguish and fist-shaking vows of defiance may have appeared at NR as I write this piece; I’ve hit the publication’s paywall from every available direction.
The first point in response to this fevered line of attack is probably the most important: It’s not at all clear that the eviction moratorium raises any constitutional issues. Yes, Biden mentioned “constitutional law” in his presser, and there is an exotic point of view among some [Republican] lower-court judges that even Congress has no constitutional power to interfere in landlord-tenant contracting arrangements. But all Kavanaugh’s famous concurrence says is that the CDC has exceeded the authority it had to make emergency declarations, which is why the problem could probably be fixed by a simple congressional authorization. Any way you look at it, it’s not like Biden wants to quarter troops in private homes or confiscate firearms. If there is a constitutional issue, it is certainly not one that calls into question Biden’s oath of office, for God’s sake.
Legal issues aside, you have to wonder if there are any Republicans on Capitol Hill who agree with NR’s advice that they make landlord rights the hill on which they will die in the fight against Joe Biden and his party. This creates, shall we say, a certain optics problem, particularly in a party that is trying to replace an elitist with a populist image.
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fuckyeahmarxismleninism · 2 months ago
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U.S. political analyst and activist Bill Dores has criticized former US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice who said on Sunday that Americans are safer today because the United States invaded Afghanistan and Iraq following the 9/11 attacks.
Commenting to Press TV on Tuesday, Dores, a writer for Struggle-La Lucha and longtime antiwar activist, said, “I wonder of whom Rice speaks.”
“On September 5, nearly 8 million jobless US workers lost their benefits. They have no means of support. Are they safer because the US government spent $6.4 trillion bombing and occupying Iraq and Afghanistan?” he asked.  
“Moratoriums on evictions, home foreclosures and utility shutoffs are ending in most states. Tens of millions are affected. Are they safer? Will the Pentagon war machine protect their homes?” he added.
“What about the people who lost their homes to Hurricane Ida? Some saw their loved ones drowned. They could use some of that ‘defense’ money,” he said.  
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Everyone else might already know this, but in England, since the end of August, Section 21 notices now have a 6 month notice period, rather than 2 months. There’s also no evictions by bailiffs for Section 21 until after lockdown ends.
This also applies to section 8 notices unless you are in more than 6 months of rent arrears or being evicted due to antisocial behaviour.
If you’re facing eviction, it’s worth bearing in mind that the date the Section 21 expires is the date the landlord can START legal action- it’s not the final move out date.
If you continue to stay after the Section 21 date (legally) you should continue to pay rent. Shelter advise you should only agree a move out date in writing once you have found somewhere else to live but you should let the landlord know you will be staying past the end of the Section 21. The landlord cannot force you out at the end of the Section 21 period- all they can do is start legal action. If you (for example) just need an extra week or two, it’s much easier for the landlord to agree to this than try to pursue legal action.
If you are hoping the council will house you, you need to talk to them before moving out. Stupid as it sounds, moving out at the end of a Section 21 notice could count as making yourself “intentionally homeless” which limits the help you will get from the council.
If you’ve received a Section 21 notice, you should first check if it is valid. There are lots of reasons why a section 21 notice might not be valid, so check this list to see if any apply: https://england.shelter.org.uk/housing_advice/eviction/section_21_eviction/how_to_check_a_section_21_notice_is_valid.
If the Section 21 is invalid, then you can challenge it in court, and the whole process goes back to the start- the landlord must fix the issues, then issue another Section 21- this could easily buy you 6 or 7 more months in the property from the end of the Section 21 period if you need them.
If the Section 21 is valid, but you don’t want to/can’t leave, then you do nothing. Tell the landlord at the last possible moment that you aren’t leaving because you haven’t found suitable housing. The landlord then has to take action. Legally, they have 4 months to start legal proceedings- after 4 months, the clock resets and the landlord has to start again.
Assuming the landlord applies to the court in time, you will get various bits of paperwork. Even if the Section 21 is fine, you should register a defence form. This means your case will be heard in court (this isn’t always automatic) and the court will check your Section 21 is valid. Even if you know your Section 21 is valid, this is a good delaying tactic as it will take time for the case to be heard in court. If you go to court, you can also appeal for the possession order to be delayed.
There are usually two court hearings about 4 weeks apart (although currently this may take longer due to Covid. The possession order will be set 2-6 weeks after the second court hearing.
If you don’t leave on the date on the possession order, the Landlord has to apply for bailiffs to remove you. The Landlord has to apply for the bailiffs, and it may be another 10 weeks or so before they can evict you BUT if you wait for bailiffs you could end up with a bill for the eviction. If the council have told you to stay put, they should pay the bill. 
Overall, this process could easily get you an extra couple of months in the property. It will obviously be stressful, and I wouldn’t recommend it if you have alternatives, but if the alternative is homelessness or insecure accommodation, it may be worth sticking it out.
Long eviction processes are also difficult/inconvenient for landlords.
This is also why you should insist on vacant possession before buying anywhere- If you buy a property with tenants in situ, you may well end up waiting a year or more to move in. Landlords obviously want evicting the tenants to be your problem not theirs, because it’s time consuming and costly and they don’t want to have to pay their own mortgage/bills whilst the property sells.
If you’ve been issued a section 8 process, there are also ways to potentially challenge/delay the eviction, but this post is super long already, so I’ll leave that for another time.
TL:DR- If you’re in the UK facing eviction, make sure you know your rights. Shelter is a good place to start for advice.
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keepleft · 2 months ago
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Squad Won't Protest Pelosi Over Eviction Moratorium Extension  >
The Jimmy Dore Show | Published September 2, 2021 | Time 22:32
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chismosite · 2 months ago
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Truthout
The coronavirus pandemic could result in some 28 million Americans being evicted. By comparison, 10 million people lost their homes in the Great Recession.
post with more links and background
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