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#fabric
austim · a day ago
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Espeon stimboard for anonymous
✨ 🔮 ✨ | 🔮 🔮 🔮 | ✨ 🔮 ✨
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honeybee-stims · a day ago
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stimboard for the song alluring secret black vow for anon!
(🕊)(🍏)(🕊)
(🍏)(🤍)(🍏)
(🕊)(🍏)(🕊)
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ahhvernin · 23 hours ago
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Darning, Sashiko, and decorative embroidery combo, a mini adventure.
A large hole had formed in my lab coat. It was getting caught in everything so I decided to mend it. My work place had told us that "dirty, lost or damaged you are responsible for your coat" I was not about to shell out cash for a coat.
I started off darning the hole, if you don't know, darning is hand stitching a hole using running stitches and a weaving method. But I soon realized it wasn't giving me the result I wanted. The fabric was still flimsy, so I ventured deeper into YouTube and found a wonderful channel called Sashiko Story, they also have a Tumblr page its @sashico , and a workshop in NYC.
The Japanese teacher makes wonderful videos full of instruction and stories filled with historian context. Sashiko is a embroidery technique developed in Japan, by the ordinary and poor folk for mending, patching, strengthening and extending the life of a piece of fabric or garment. Garments that saw repetitive sashiko mending is known as boro, a type of patchwork. Sashiko is relatively easy to do compared to other hand stitching techniques as it implements pretty much only the running stitch.
I binge watched his videos, picked up the technique he teaches, and tried it out on my coat while listening to his live streams. I have to say the holding technique reminded me of how my grandma would mend clothes. She was fast. And the end result made me giddy. The hole was now closed! The darning had held the original threads together, the sashiko, helped it close it up more and made it stiffer and the texture is delightful. As a tactile person, the sensation was very satisfying.
A day later, I looked over at my coat and noticed the pattern that I used also resembled leaves. Now from my limited knowledge, sashiko traditionally doesn't use fill ins, but I've been also been binging on the channel Chinese Hand Embroidery that teaches the Suzhou techniques, and leaves, flowers and nature were on my mind. So I decided to fill in some of the spaces, despite not using the techniques.
I couldn't be more pleased and happy with my coat. When I'm stressed at work, the difference in texture helps relax me, the stiffness is also very grounding to me. And the best part was the mend was very easy to do, and the result is quite beautiful in my eyes...and I no longer get caught by the drawers.
So I highly recommend checking out the 2 YouTube channels. Maybe they might spark some mending projects.
I am also just delighted that this little patch job reflects my Asian American identity back to me. And reminds me I can use both western techniques but also from China where my family is from, but also learn and enjoy from other Asian cultures.
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wastelesscrafts · 2 months ago
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Visible Mending
Introduction:
Visible mending is a decorative way to fix up an item. Instead of trying to make your mend as invisible as possible, the idea is to make it part of the garment's design.
Visual mending is not a single technique: it's more of a mindset. If you've got an item you love, it deserves to be mended, and if you're going to put that love into stitches, why not show them off?
That being said, there are some specific techniques that are popular with visible menders. Let's take a look!
Sashiko:
Sashiko is a type of traditional Japanese embroidery that is used to both decorate and reinforce fabric. In visible mending, sashiko is often used to cover up holes with patches or to reinforce thinning fabric. This technique uses a variation on the running stitch.
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(Image source) [ID: sashiko stitch diagram: the distance between each stitch is 1/2 stitch in length.]
Some resources on sashiko:
SashiCo on YouTube: sashiko livestreams and information on the cultural aspect of sashiko.
Written tutorial by Upcycle Stitches.
Free sashiko templates by TheSpruceCrafts.
Fixing jeans with sashiko by Soluna Collective.
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(Image source) [ID: three examples of sashiko embroidery on jeans fabric.]
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(Image source) [ID: sashiko embroidery with white thread on blue jeans fabric.]
Embroidery:
Regular embroidery is also a popular technique to accentuate your mends. Check out my embroidery 101 post to learn how to get started. You can embroider patches, or use embroidery to hide or accentuate any stitches you've made to fix holes. Embroidery's also a great way to cover up stains.
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(Image source) [ID: colourful embroidery floss covers a worn sleeve edge of a jeans jacket]
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(Image source) [ID: colourful flower embroidery surrounds a hole in a pair of dark gray jeans. Fabric with a red and black flower print peaks out of the hole.]
Patches:
There are many ways to add patches to a garment. My tutorial on patches is a good place to start if you want to make custom-shaped patches to sew on top of your fabric. You can also sew your patch on the inside of your garment and have it peek out from beneath the hole you're trying to fix. Fun ideas for this are lace or superheroes.
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(Image source) [ID: Spiderman peaking out of a rip in a pair of blue jeans.]
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(Source) [ID: a red flannel heart-shaped elbow patch on a gray knitted sweater.]
Darning:
Darning is a technique used to repair holes in fabric by using running stitches to weave extra fabric over the hole as to fill it up again. While traditionally darning is done in an invisible way by using the same colour of thread as your fabric, you can also use contrasting colours to accentuate your fix. Check out this written tutorial on darning by TheSpruceCrafts.
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(Image source) [ID: vintage instructions on how to darn a hole.]
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(Image source) [ID: four examples of darning on blue fabric with colourful contrasting thread.]
Conclusion:
Visible mending is a creative way to fix up your clothes and give them some personality at the same time.
You should be proud of the fact that you took the time and learned the necessary skills needed to mend your clothes! Show off what you did!
A fun side effect of wearing these obvious mends is that people will notice them. They'll remember your fixes the next time they're faced with a hole in their wardrobe, and it will make them more likely to try it for themselves.
These are just a few ways to visibly mend your garments. Want more inspiration? Check out Pinterest or r/Visiblemending on Reddit.
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queermaddscientist · 3 months ago
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Get yourself a fabric store that will light your fabric on fire for you
No but legit I asked what the fiber content of something was and the guy didn’t know so he cut a chunk off and lit it on fire and felt the ashes and was like. Yeah this is mostly cotton with a lil bit of silk. And that was the moment I knew. This is it. This is the fabric store for me. Also that guy is marriage material. Not for me but damn some person is gonna be so happy with him.
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onimuoyinbo · 11 months ago
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**UPDATE**
Thanks to everyone who read, liked and reblogged. This has been wholesome and I am glad I’m not the only one who is going through this.
On a side note, if everyone who engaged with this post donated £1/$1, I would be rolling in dough but it’s all good - you are all wonderful people and I appreciate you all.
**
A lady asked me how much it cost to make her a purse of a well known style in cotton fabric of a particular design and colour. £35 - I said. She said she thought that was a bit dear for a purse. I asked her how much she thought it would cost her to make one then. She thought about £10 as you can get similar in Primarni for £8 OK, so for £10 do it yourself I said Her reply was - I don't know how to. I said for £10 I'll teach you how to. So besides saving you £25 you'll get the knowledge if you ever want to make another. She seemed pleased and agreed. OK I said, you'll need a machine, cutting mat, rotary cutter, rivet press and the pattern. Oh well..... I don't have many of things and I can't justify buying all that just to make one purse. Well then for another £10 more I'll lend you my stuff to you so you can do it at my house. Okay, she says. Great, I replied, come round on Tuesday afternoon and we'll make a start Oh, I can't come on Tuesday I'm having my hair done! Sorry, but I'm only available Tuesday to teach you and lend you my stuff. Other days are busy with other bags and purses. Bugger, that means I'll have to miss my haircut. Oh, I forgot, I said, to make one yourself you also have to pay for the sundry costs. Now she's confused – what on earth are they?? Fabric search time, electric, wear and tear on the machine, blades for the cutter etc She looks at me and says – but that's ridiculous you can absorb all that cost as you are charging me to borrow your stuff. I could, I said, but I'm not spending time looking for the fabric you need you can do that yourself – you need 3 fat quarters of fabric, buckram, woven interfacing, non woven interfacing, a lock, rivets and matching thread. So she then says - I've been thinking, I think I'd rather pay you the £35. It's too complicated to make one for myself, it wouldn't be as well made and it would cost me a hell of a lot more than £35. When you pay for a hand crafted item, you pay not only for the material used, but also: - knowledge - experience - tools - services - time - enthusiasm Only by knowing all the elements necessary for the production of a certain item can you estimate the actual cost.
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kahsakayute · 2 days ago
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Tom Rumble
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Dinosaur who has had a very stressful week but is doing better now, and also had a very nice time at the fabric store. (This is the first year I can remember actually seeing 100% wool at Fabricville, usually their selection is quite terrible)
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vincentbriggs · 28 days ago
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I made these repeating patterns years ago in textiles class in college, and recently realized that I ought to post them for sale on Spoonflower and MyFabricDesigns, so they are there now! I also put them on some things on Redbubble, along with some other prints. I changed the colour and scale of some of them after getting my samples from spoonflower. The monsters were a bit too big, the brown coffins not saturated enough, etc.
They’re all hand drawn and scanned, with colour and texture added in photoshop, and I’m most proud of the bismuth one. I only have 10 patterns at the moment, but will draw more!
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aqua-regia009 · a month ago
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The Three Fates (c.1910) - Alexander Rothaug
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marjolijnmakes · 2 months ago
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"What did people wear in pre-historic times? Brown, jute-like clothing might be what you’re thinking of, but even 3000 years ago we wore bright colours, Dutch scientists discovered.
Based on original textile remains which date around 800 BC, they have reconstructed a dress which must have been worn in the early Iron Age. The garment was bright red and blue, reseach shows. An important discovery.
The textileremains were found in 2011 in a grave in a pre-historic gravesite near Uden. “It was a pretty normal excavation, until we suddenly found a rechtangular ditch”, says archeologist Richard Jansen, who was involved in the discovery.
“After much discussion we chose to work downwards layer by layer. When we came to the lowest level, the silhouette of a body became visible. Extraordinary, because people in those days were almost all cremated, and not buried.”
Next to textileremains they also found some jewellery in the grave with which the person, probably a woman, was buried. Amongst which are three bronze bracelets, two bronze anklets, a set of toiletries with a nailfile and a pair of tweezers.
“It was a lady of high status,” says archeologist Sasja van der Vaart-Verschoof, associated with the Leyden Museum of Antiquities (Rijksmuseum van Oudheden). “Absolutely no one, as far as we know, had this combination of remarkable objects.”
De textileremains make the grave of international significane, according to van der Vaart-Verschoof. “Textile normally never survives in the ground. That we still have it, after 3000 years, is because the textile was wrapped around the bracelets and anklets. The bronze rusted, which works its way into the fabric. That is how it was preserved.”
“What makes it even more extraordinary, is that we can see in which pattern the dress was woven, so which threads were red and which were blue. We can see that they were woven into a very familiar block pattern.”
Yvonne Lammers, archeologist and head of the pre-historic village in Eindhoven, reconstructed the dress with the help of volunteers. “We know quite a lot about the Iron Age, actually: that they were farmers with cropland and animals, that they were selfsufficient in everything. That they wool and linen, that they could spin yarn, which techniques they used for weaving. But this is not a regular, every-day dress, you have to compare it to a Chanel-suit, that’s how much work went into this.”
[In the video embedded in the website you see how van der Vaart-Verschoof and her colleagues discovered that the brown textile remains were actually red-blue blocked and you can see how the researchers reconstructed the dress, by among other things spinning ten kilometers (10km or 6,2 miles) of thread. Video is in Dutch, but worth a watch!]
As far as Lammers is concerned the find is going to have consequences for the way the volunteers in the museum are dressed. “A lot of visitors in our museum have the idea that it was stirring into the brown slush: brown dresses, brown houses, brown pots. If you can show that they absolutely were a very developed people who valued what they looked like, that makes them a very different kind of people.”
De reconstructed dress, the original textileremains, the jewellery and the toiletry set are exhibited until the 16th of January in museum Jan Cunen in Oss."
Source (in Dutch), with a few more pictures and a video where you can see the dress being worn!! Translation by me, sorry for any weird sentences. Tagging @systlin because it seems right up your alley!
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phoenixyfriend · a year ago
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Wh D Do you know how we get wool?
BY THE WAY, HERE’S THE SUMMARY FROM WIKIPEDIA PAGE ON PASHMINA:
“Goats used for pashmina shed their winter coat every spring. One goat sheds approximately 80–170 gram (3–6 ounces) of the fibre. See also cashmere wool.
In the spring (the moulting season), the goats naturally shed their undercoat, which regrows in winter. This undercoat is collected by combing the goat, not by shearing, as in other fine wools.”
IT’S NOT EVEN SHEARING WHICH CAN MAYBE NICK THE SKIN BY ACCIDENT
IT’S COMBED OUT
It’s as cruel as brushing your cat for loose hair
Like... dude... why are you replacing an actual cruelty-free organic material with something will SHED MICROPLASTICS
You are using polyester (crude oil) and a highly-polluting plant-based material I just
“Cruelty-free alternative” IT’S ALREADY CRUELTY FREE
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soft-stims · a month ago
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Lily Moth -  Polytela gloriosae
x x x - x x - x x x
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