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#fun facts
barbie-edits · 2 days ago
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Fun little connection!
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Makes me wonder if she specifically became Alexa's Lady Royal.
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that-crazy-australian · 18 hours ago
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dearly · 2 days ago
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who is gonna make a louis leia bun manip? 
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marlynnofmany · 9 months ago
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I knew that the eruption/explosion of Krakatoa was the loudest sound in recorded history, but I couldn’t quite grasp how loud until I got a couple details of perspective. This was in 1883.
The shock wave ruptured the eardrums of sailors 40 miles away.
The explosion was heard more than 3,000 miles away, and recorded all over the world.
It made tsunamis nearly 100 feet high.
Now picture this happening in modern times, with modern communications. Not only would there be uncountable videos and whatnot, but the timing is what really gets me. Imagine you’re going about your day, scrolling social media, and posts start pouring in about an apocalyptic volcano on the other side of the continent. The news are full of it. You spend ages glued to the screen; this isn’t remotely close to you, but it’s a big deal, and you know people who live closer to it.
Three hours later, something explodes outside. Propane tank? Car fire? Some jackass with illegal firecrackers?
Nope. That was the sound wave, finally reaching you.
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cheshirelibrary · 11 months ago
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learnyouabiology · 2 months ago
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Fun Fact: Oilbirds are Basically BatBirds!
I want to talk about these amazing birds:
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I love them. I mean, look at their big, shiny eyes! NO ONE can say that they aren’t cute as hell!
The other reason I love these animals is because they’re basically what happens when evolution tries to make a bat out of a bird.
These little guys are known as oilbirds (Steatornis caripensis), and are also called guácharo (and also several other things, because they are found in South America, plus Trinidad & Tobago, which all have INCREDIBLE language diversity). 
Oilbirds are nocturnal, flying around the forests of South America at night looking for fruit to eat. They also live colonially in caves, which they navigate using echolocation.
So, to review:
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(I’m making my Generic Bats a very generic fruit bat, for the record).
Oilbirds are the only birds with this combination of traits, which I think is pretty cool of them! Why are they so much like bats? Basically, when different types of animals evolve under similar selective pressures, they often evolve the same features! This is called convergent evolution, and wow I talk about it a lot on this blog! It turns out that nocturnal animals that live in caves and eat fruit can sometimes benefit from traits like these!
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(they’re, like... spooky-cute. Cute-spooky? Either way, I like them a lot)
So, if these birds are flying around at night, how do they stop themselves from flying into things while searching for that tasty, tasty fruit?
Well, in the forest, they mostly rely on their AMAZING night vision (which is another trait they share with bats, fyi). That is why they have such big, adorable eyes, which has a lot of light-sensing cells called rods. They actually hold a record for the density of the rods in their eyes: one million per square millimetre. That is the highest density of any known vertebrate. It’s about 6x denser than the rods found in human eyes! 
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...still cute
Their amazing vision allows them to see very well in low light, which is how they navigate the South American jungles at night, searching for food under the moon and stars. That said, their vision just doesn’t cut it when it comes to flying in the caves they call home. Why? Well, caves are dark as hell, and even the best night-vision can’t do anything for you when there’s no light at all. Plus, flying into cave walls/ cliff faces hurts, so it’s good to be extra sure you’re not flying into solid rock!
So how do they find their way around these dark caves? Well, they use something very unusual for birds: echolocation!
Oilbirds are one of only a few species of birds that are known to use echolocation (the others are a few species of  the closely-related swiflets (Collocaliini), but I HAVE DECIDED TODAY IS FOR THE OILBIRDS im sorry, swiflets, ilu2).
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Look at them, not flying into rocks! I’m so proud (˃̣̣̥ ◡ ˂̣̣̥)
Also, a bonus fact, because idk where to fit this but I MUST mention it:
They have little whiskers around their beaks (which are technically called “rictal bristles”, but I’m going to call them “whiskers” because I like that word better). These whiskers are basically used to feel things that they have in and around their mouth, helping them find, manipulate, and eat their tasty fruit!
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...moustache...
This has been Fun Fact Friday!
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platypu · 3 months ago
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Love that there was an academic agreement to change the name of killer whales to something nicer - because it seemed a little bit mean to call a whale a "killer whale". So they were like okay we'll call them something different, and they ended up settling on "Orca" from their scientific name Orcinus orca. Except Orca literally means "demon from hell". Like ⁉️ a bad bitch can't win
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animated-favorites · 5 months ago
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Facts About PRINCESS MONONOKE (1997)
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The original concept for the film actually began in the 1970s with a few sketches by director Hayao Miyazaki. However, since there was such a wide gap between the initial concept and the actual production, many of the early ideas were instead used for My Neighbor Totoro.
The animation team used over 550 colors throughout the entire movie, and Miyazaki himself corrected or redrew more than 80,000 of the 144,000 animation cells.
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Princess Mononoke was one of two titles proposed for the film, the other being The Legend of Ashitaka. While producer Toshio Suzuki had the final say in the name of the movie, Miyazaki has always stated that he preferred the alternate. “The Legend of Ashitaka” was instead used for the main piece of the film’s score.
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Iron Town is heavily influenced by the John Ford western My Darling Clementine, which featured a town that, according to Miyazaki, is full of “characters from outcast groups and repressed minorities who rarely, if ever, appear in Japanese films.”
“Mononoke” translates to “unknown thing,” and is commonly used to refer to vengeful spirits. The word dates back to the 11th century. On the same note, “Ashitaka” means “bright tomorrow,” and “San” means “three.” It’s implied that the character is named that because she is Moro’s third cub.
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Miyazaki originally planned to retire after the completion of the film, but of course returned not too long after to make Spirited Away, which was released only four years later.
Princess Mononoke was the first animated film to win Best Picture at the Japanese Academy Awards (which began in 1978), a milestone that has yet to be achieved by the Academy Awards in the U.S. (which began in 1929). The same award was given to Spirited Away in 2001.
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With a runtime of 134 minutes, it is the 4th longest animated film ever, ranking behind only Final Yamoto (1983), The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya (2010), and The Tale of Princess Kaguya (2013) - all of which were also produced in Japan.
The character of San was apparently used as inspiration by the creators of Star Wars: The Clone Wars for the character of Ahsoka Tano, taking heavy influence from her movement and fighting style.
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cheezwizzer · 5 months ago
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Moths. Feathers. Moths with feathers*!!
*These feathers are brought to you by CONVERGENT EVOLUTION!
So, here's the Alucitidae Family!! Commonly known as the many-plumed moths!! (Note, there’s also just plume moths, in the Pterophoridae family, but I wanted to talk about these ones today)
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Their wings are really something else! Each wing is made up of about 6 flexible spines from which bristles (similar to the barbs of bird feathers) project laterally forming feathers! There are about 200 species known, they are pretty small, the wingspan of adults ranging from 7-28mm. They are distributed in temperate and subtropical regions worldwide and, not surprisingly, are mostly nocturnal and some crepuscular. Their larvae tunnel through the leaves and buds of various shrubs, the larvae of the type species for example, Alucita hexadactyla (pictured above as adult, as larva below), feeds on honeysuckle!
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Also as a little fun fact, until 2004 there was only one species of many-plumed moth known to live in North America, A. montana (lowest photo) which was by the way mistaken to be the same as the European type species I talked above, since then however, two more species have been discovered by Bernard and Jean-François Landry, A. adriendenisi (left) and A. lalannei (right)!
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Mothman's fashionable brother.
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apollonianposts · 8 months ago
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"the skeleton flower is a white flower that turns translucent when it rains"
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vagueshape · 3 months ago
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Fun fact: one of the reasons why we stopped using thou is because people hated the quakers.
"Thou" was the informal "you" and "You" was formal, and the quakers just kinda refused to use the formal one because they were all about egalitarianism. A lot of people didn't want to be mistaken for quakers so they started only using formal "you" to avoid that. And it basically ended up being phased out of English because of that. And that's why we don't have formal and informal "you" like other languages do!
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muppet-facts · a day ago
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Muppet Fact #439
The same puppet used for Pancake the Water Buffalo from Animal Jam was used in an episode of Hannah Montana. She was called Pancake in both shows.
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Sources:
Animal Jam. Episode 128: "A Water Buffalo Named Pancake." April 2, 2003.
Hannah Montana. "Hannah in the Street with Diamonds." July 20, 2008.
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sun-rust · 4 months ago
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Chlorociboria aeruginascens (and the macroscopically identical species Chlorociboria aeruginosa) is a fungus commonly known as the "green elfcup", or "green wood cup", due to its characteristic small, blue-green saucer shaped fruit bodies. They are often found on bark-free dead wood, particularly oak, beech, ash and hazel all year round. Their fruit bodies, however, are seen much more infrequently than the turquoise staining of wood caused by said fungus, also called "spalting". Spalted wood also comes in many other varieties. It is prized by fine woodworkers and has been used since the 14th century in wood inlays. A great example of this is Tunbridge ware wooden box covers, decorated with colorful designs made from pieces of different colored woods, many of which were spalted. Pigmentation of the infected wood occurs when fungi produce extracellular pigments, in this case Xylindein, inside of its fibers. However, in some spalting fungi, pigments are generally bound within the hyphae cell walls. A visible color change can be seen if enough hyphae are concentrated in an area.
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theskeletongames · 3 days ago
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Fun Fact
I think of Gasterblasters as an attack with some consciousness, however that consciousness comes from the inner feelings and reactions of the caster. If the blaster does something strange, it could be representative of the caster’s true inner feelings.
UF Sans may have a hard time getting his blasters to stop being so damn honest sometimes.
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marlynnofmany · 11 months ago
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I am making a LIST of cool things that could be spell components. Ghost-glass apples definitely belong on this list.
(Description under cut)
Screenshot of a tweet by Tyler Sebree, saying “After freezing rain in Michigan, apples that hadn’t been picked got coated in ice. Many fell off the tree. Some had their insides turn to mush as apples have lower freezing points. The mush and skin fell, leaving these ‘ghost apples.’”
This is quote-tweeted by Annie Bellet, who adds “you just know that this is a spell component.”
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nasa · 9 months ago
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Our Galaxy is Caught Up in a Giant Cosmic Cobweb! 🕸️
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If we could zoom waaaay out, we would see that galaxies and galaxy clusters make up large, fuzzy threads, like the strands of a giant cobweb. But we'll work our way out to that. First let's start at home and look at our planet's different cosmic communities.
Our home star system
Earth is one of eight planets — Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune — that orbit the Sun. But our solar system is more than just planets; it also has a lot of smaller objects.
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An asteroid belt circles the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. Beyond Neptune is a doughnut-shaped region of icy objects called the Kuiper Belt. This is where dwarf planets like Pluto and Makemake are found and is likely the source of short-period comets (like Haley’s comet), which orbit the Sun in less than 200 years.
Scientists think that even farther out lies the Oort Cloud, also a likely source of comets. This most distant region of our solar system is a giant spherical shell storing additional icy space debris the size of mountains, or larger! The outer edge of the Oort Cloud extends to about 1.5 light-years from the Sun — that’s the distance light travels in a year and a half (over 9 trillion miles).
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Sometimes asteroids or comets get ejected from these regions and end up sharing an orbit with planets like Jupiter or even crossing Earth’s orbit. There are even interstellar objects that have entered the inner solar system from even farther than the Oort Cloud, perhaps coming all the way from another star!
Our home galaxy
Let's zoom out to look at the whole Milky Way galaxy, which contains more than 100 billion stars. Many are found in the galaxy’s disk — the pancake-shaped part of a spiral galaxy where the spiral arms lie. The brightest and most massive stars are found in the spiral arms, close to their birth places. Dimmer, less massive stars can be found sprinkled throughout the disk. Also found throughout the spiral arms are dense clouds of gas and dust called nebulae. The Sun lies in a small spiral arm called the Orion Spur.
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The Milky Way’s disk is embedded in a spherical “halo” about 120,000 light-years across. The halo is dotted with globular clusters of old stars and filled with dark matter. Dark matter doesn’t emit enough light for us to directly detect it, but we know it’s there because without its mass our galaxy doesn’t have enough gravity to hold together!
Our galaxy also has several orbiting companion galaxies ranging from about 25,000 to 1.4 million light-years away. The best known of these are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, which are visible to the unaided eye from Earth’s Southern Hemisphere.
Our galactic neighborhood
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The Milky Way and Andromeda, our nearest neighboring spiral galaxy, are just two members of a small group of galaxies called the Local Group. They and the other members of the group, 50 to 80 smaller galaxies, spread across about 10 million light-years.
The Local Group lies at the outskirts of an even larger structure. It is just one of at least 100 groups and clusters of galaxies that make up the Virgo Supercluster. This cluster of clusters spans about 110 million light-years!
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Galaxies aren’t the only thing found in a galaxy cluster, though. We also find hot gas, as shown above in the bright X-ray light (in pink) that surrounds the galaxies (in optical light) of cluster Abell 1413, which is a picturesque member of a different supercluster. Plus, there is dark matter throughout the cluster that is only detectable through its gravitational interactions with other objects.
The Cosmic Web
The Virgo Supercluster is just one of many, many other groups of galaxies. But the universe’s structure is more than just galaxies, clusters, and the stuff contained within them.
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For more than two decades, astronomers have been mapping out the locations of galaxies, revealing a filamentary, web-like structure. This large-scale backbone of the cosmos consists of dark matter laced with gas. Galaxies and clusters form along this structure, and there are large voids in between.
The scientific visualizations of this “cosmic web” look a little like a spider web, but that would be one colossal spider! <shudder>
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And there you have the different communities that define Earth’s place in the universe. Our tiny planet is a small speck on a crumb of that giant cosmic web!
Want to learn even more about the structures in the universe? Check out our Cosmic Distance Scale!
Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space.
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learnyouabiology · 5 months ago
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Fun Fact: some “pill bugs” are crustaceans. Others... are not
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When I was around 12, a friend of mine told me that “potato bugs” (which is what we called these^ dudes where I grew up) weren’t actually bugs.
“They’re crustaceans,” she said, gleefully handing me a few. “Like crabs.”
This was shocking and delightful to me, and I carefully stored this fun fact away in the part of my brain used for exactly these sorts of fun facts. (I don’t remember where I stored the potato bugs she handed me, but my mom probably made me put them back in the garden).
Later, I learned that, while this is true, it wasn’t the whole story. It was true that some “potato bugs” (aka “pill bugs”) are terrestrial crustaceans. But there was another kind as well, living side-by-side with our funky little crustaceans, looking much the same
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The crustacean pill bugs that my friend was talking about are members of the family Armadillidae. The second group are a type of millipede, which we group together into the order Oniscomorpha. Here’s a comparison:
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pretty similar, right? Which is why it’s interesting that these guys aren’t closely related at all. (Also, I would like to voice my support of using the word “bug” to mean “terrestrial invertebrate”. Prescriptivist language is silly, and I say that spiders can be called “bugs” because that’s what people often call them. Hemipterans, don’t @ me with your “True Bug” claims 😉).
This is an excellent example of convergent evolution, in which two groups of organisms adapt to similar environments in similar ways, even though they’re not closely related. These two buggos both like to live under things, such as rocks, rotting logs, leaf litter, and paving stones, where they eat decomposing organic matter and generally live their best lives.
Clearly, this design was very well-suited for this way of life! 
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(This meme is deeply incorrect, but I thought it was funny. 1. they objectively came to the same design independently, bc evolution doesn’t copy homework (except with horizontal gene transfer but that’s a whole OTHER tangent) 2. I don’t actually know who came first. They both appeared in in Carboniferous period at least 300 million years ago, but that is a RANGE OF TIME, so 🤷‍♂️. )
And it doesn’t stop there! I guess the “armour on back, curl up when spooked” design is pretty popular in the tree of life!
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This has been fun fact friday keeping you updated on the latest trends, all the way from the Carboniferous period!!
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