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#get vaxxed
odinsbloga day ago
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Look, I understand that some people all of a sudden don鈥檛 trust vaccinations, but please get vaccinated for shingles. That shit ain鈥檛 no joke.
馃憠馃徔 https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/shingles/symptoms-causes/syc-20353054
馃憠馃徔 https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/ss/slideshow-shingles-myths-facts
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spidermartini2 months ago
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Ok....The Baltimore Department of Health WINS.
Please share these....they are just SO GOOD.
(All I can hear is that last one in Trixie Mattel's voice)
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5.29 Billion Doses Worldwide so far! 馃拤馃寧 Let's keep it up, babes! 馃挭
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csquirrel272 months ago
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Baltimore might have the best Get Vaxxed campaign going right now.
It's hilarious and true. These are gold! 馃ぃ馃ぃ馃ぃ
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lemondropbrokeit2 months ago
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A slow escalation of a convo from my Discord aha.聽
Listen to your doctors folks, stay vaccinated and stay safe,聽
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someemochicka month ago
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battling-my-demonsa month ago
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Y'all are so pro-life until it comes to wearing a mask and getting a life saving vaccine for yourself and the others around you. You're so pro-life until the baby turns out to be gay. You're so pro-life until the baby is born and the mother can't afford the bills and food and everything that comes with a baby. You're so pro-life until the life comes here to have a better life for that child and family. You're so pro-life until it comes to the homeless men women and children who need money and food. You're so pro-life but won't adopt the hundreds of thousands of kids and teens in orphanages who need a family. You're so pro-life but won't do anything to protect those children from being abused and mistreated by the foster system or foster parents who use them for the money. Trust me, you aren't pro-life, you're pro have the baby and then I don't give a shit about you or your baby. Abortion is health care. It's about the person's own body. You have no right to tell anyone what to do with their own bodies.
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ceevee5a month ago
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spoonienation2 months ago
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odinsblog24 days ago
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Florida鈥檚 per capita COVID death rate is 50 times Australia鈥檚. In just one week, Florida surpassed Australia鈥檚 18 month death toll.
Roughly the same populations, but radically different outcomes from preventable coronavirus deaths. (source)
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spooniestrongart2 months ago
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soccer-4-lifea month ago
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Well this is sad馃槩 great job Spirit. Maybe stop being fucking selfish and get vaccinated. These games are important to these fans馃槨
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bbysika2 months ago
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my titties got bigger after two rounds of pfizer trust me im a scientist xxx
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route22ny21 days ago
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Survivor stories: Death, loss and selflessness during the pandemic
By Jacqueline Cutler / New York Daily News
Those days when the word corona made you think beer or crown feel like long-gone innocence.
So much happened during these 18 months that how we鈥檙e reacting to different phases of the pandemic and how survivors are coping are worth documenting.
鈥淰oices from the Pandemic: Americans Tell Their Stories of Crisis, Courage and Resilience鈥 is a powerful reflection on the last year and a half. Pulitzer-winning journalist Eli Saslow has managed the near-impossible: He makes you want to read more about the pandemic.
This doesn鈥檛 bother with maps of where the virus is spiking or death tolls. It can鈥檛 be of the moment. Instead, it鈥檚 the story of all of us 鈥 those who have taken every precaution and those who refused to acknowledge COVID鈥檚 deadly path.
Done in the style of the late great Studs Terkel, these are oral histories as the history is happening. Each section has people sharing their stories in their words.
Sure, it鈥檚 edited for clarity, but there鈥檚 no spin. It鈥檚 unfailingly fair: When a tenant recounts her eviction, the next entry is from a landlord who exhausted her savings trying to not evict people.
Even though we think we know the stories of the pandemic, we can鈥檛 鈥 at least not all of them. And we never may. Saslow carefully selected a cross-section of people; some who have since died, some who recovered, some who never may.
Saslow reminds us of the first whisperings. On Jan. 4, 2020, there was news about what was considered a pneumonia outbreak in China. Five weeks later, it had a name, COVID-19.
A month later, life as we knew it stopped.
鈥淪he鈥檚 dead, and I鈥檓 quarantined,鈥 Tony Sizemore, of Indianapolis, says of his love, Birdie Shelton, in the first entry from March 2020. 鈥淭hat鈥檚 how the story ends. I keep going back over it in loops, trying to find a way to sweeten it, but nothing changes the facts. I wasn鈥檛 there with her at the end. I didn鈥檛 get to say goodbye. I don鈥檛 even know where her body is right now, or if the only thing that鈥檚 left is her ashes.鈥
With that gut-wrenching opening, we鈥檙e off. We meet dozens of people we鈥檝e never heard of, which is precisely the point. Everyone knew when Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson were among the first celebrities to get COVID.
But this book introduces Bruce MacGillis, a man in an Ohio nursing home. He refused to let temp workers who couldn鈥檛 wear masks correctly get near him and isolated himself until he was vaccinated.
鈥淚鈥檓 a hard-ass about this stuff, and I鈥檓 not even a little bit sorry,鈥 he told Saslow. 鈥淚 can鈥檛 afford to take chances.鈥
Some who tell their stories are the superheroes of the pandemic.
A shift leader of a nursing team in Detroit, Sal Hadwan, recounts insane shifts. While we celebrate and honor health care workers 鈥 now more than ever 鈥 the dire conditions they were working under were horrifying. Remember garbage bags serving as protective gear? Some had one mask per shift.
In April 2020, Hadwan said: 鈥淲e鈥檙e basically handling the most severe cases in the ER, which is not our training. These nurses don鈥檛 have a second to relax. You鈥檝e got one patient鈥檚 oxygen running out and another whose heart rate is going wild. All you can do is try your best to hear the alarms and then sprint as fast as you can from one emergency to the next. You hope you make it in time. Sometimes you don鈥檛.鈥
Naturally, it鈥檚 bleak. But there are also stories of humanity at its best.
Burnell Cotlon of New Orleans (pictured above) turned his grocery store in the Lower Ninth Ward into a food pantry. He couldn鈥檛 afford to, but some of his neighbors couldn鈥檛 afford to eat.
As he said in April 2020, 鈥淟ast week, I caught a lady in the back of the store stuffing things into her purse. We don鈥檛 really have shoplifters here.鈥 He knows the customers in his two-aisle market. The woman swiped a carton of eggs, hot dogs, and candy bars.
鈥淪he started crying,鈥 Cotlon told Saslow. 鈥淪he said she had three kids, and her man had lost his job, and they had nothing to eat and no place to go. Maybe it was a lie. I don鈥檛 know. But who鈥檚 making up stories for seven or eight dollars of groceries? She was telling me, 鈥楶lease, please, I鈥檓 begging you. How are we supposed to eat?鈥 I stood there for a minute and thought about it, and what am I going to do?鈥
Colton started running tabs 鈥 for the first time. He went from having zero customers on credit to 62 within a month. He kept giving to neighbors until he fell three months behind on his mortgage.
In a postscript, Saslow adds that when Colton鈥檚 generosity became known, online fundraisers brought in $500,000. Naturally, he put it to great use: forgiving his customers鈥 debt and beginning construction on a subsidized apartment building. 鈥淗e also gave out free school supplies and turned his store into a free vaccination site for the community.鈥
Every page in this is sobering. Every story chilling, relatable, and absolutely forthright.
For those who lost their jobs and who were living paycheck-to-paycheck, rent became impossible to pay. To lose your job, your health, your relatives and now your home is unbearable. Granted, the news often focuses on the tenants, while many of us assume landlords only take time out from counting their money to harass tenants.
It鈥檚 a lot easier to feel for the tenants, who are doing all they can.
Saslow interviewed Tusdae Barr, evicted during the pandemic. Although money was tight before COVID, Barr was making rent with everyone in her family chipping in 鈥 until work dried up. Barr eventually found herself ousted, then in cheap motels, and finally with relatives.
If you never thought you could sympathize with a landlord, meet Jayne Rocco of Deland, Fla. She became a landlord 25 years ago when broke, reeling from a divorce. Rocco found a lender, bought and fixed up a cheap house, then flipped it and bought two houses. She continued doing this until she had 10 properties, none fancy. Rocco鈥檚 profit was about $40,000 a year pre-pandemic.
Trying to help her tenants and pay her bills, Rocco exhausted her savings. She鈥檚 still trying, and still has troubles. With some of the people featured, their troubles are financial. For some, such as a newlywed, former athlete Kaitlin Denis, of Chicago, the effects of long-term COVID, are medical. She鈥檚 drained and can barely get out of bed.
And some trying to help, such as Amber Elliot, county health director in Farmington, Mo., found herself threatened with anti-vaxxers posting photos of her kids online.
The book ends with a leading voice of science. Stanley Plotkin, 88, a virologist, 鈥渄eveloped the rubella vaccine that鈥檚 now in standard use throughout the world.鈥 He鈥檚 worked on other life-saving vaccines and consults for the World Health Organization.
鈥淧arents can expect their children to grow up, and that鈥檚 a relatively new thing,鈥 Plotkin told Saslow in January. 鈥淚t shouldn鈥檛 be taken for granted.鈥
If this pandemic has taught us anything, it鈥檚 that nothing can.
(source)
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