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stunninginteriors · a day ago
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♦ Home Inspirations | Interiors, Architectures -  @stunninginteriors ♦
✨  Optical Glass House by  ©️ Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP
𝘏𝘪𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘩𝘪𝘮𝘢, 𝘑𝘢𝘱𝘢𝘯 / 𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘢 385 𝘮² /  📷  𝘒𝘰𝘫𝘪 𝘍𝘶𝘫𝘪, 𝘕𝘢𝘤𝘢𝘴𝘢 & 𝘗𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘯𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘐𝘯𝘤
" ... 𝘖𝘱𝘵𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭 𝘎𝘭𝘢𝘴𝘴 𝘏𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘶𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘣𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘥𝘦 𝘢 𝘣𝘶𝘴𝘺 𝘳𝘰𝘢𝘥, 𝘴𝘰 𝘏𝘪𝘳𝘰𝘴𝘩𝘪 𝘕𝘢𝘬𝘢𝘮𝘶𝘳𝘢 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘴𝘵𝘶𝘥𝘪𝘰 𝘕𝘈𝘗 𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘢 𝘱𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘰𝘢𝘴𝘪𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘴𝘵𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘱𝘦𝘰𝘱𝘭𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘧𝘧𝘪𝘤 𝘣𝘦𝘺𝘰𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘴. "𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘦 𝘴𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘭𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘴𝘤𝘦𝘯𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘤𝘢𝘳𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘮𝘴 𝘪𝘮𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘴 𝘳𝘪𝘤𝘩𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘦," 𝘴𝘢𝘪𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘤𝘩𝘪𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵.  ... T𝘰 𝘰𝘣𝘵𝘢𝘪𝘯 𝘱𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘤𝘺 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴𝘦 𝘴𝘶𝘳𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴, 𝘸𝘦 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘦𝘥 𝘢 𝘨𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘰𝘱𝘵𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭 𝘨𝘭𝘢𝘴𝘴 𝘧𝘢ç𝘢𝘥𝘦 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘵 𝘴𝘪𝘥𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘦. 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘯 𝘪𝘴 𝘷𝘪𝘴𝘪𝘣𝘭𝘦 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘳𝘰𝘰𝘮𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘦 𝘴𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘭𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘴𝘤𝘦𝘯𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘤𝘢𝘳𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘮𝘴 𝘪𝘮𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘴 𝘳𝘪𝘤𝘩𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘦. 𝘚𝘶𝘯𝘭𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘦𝘢𝘴𝘵, 𝘳𝘦𝘧𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘭𝘢𝘴𝘴, 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘢𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘧𝘶𝘭 𝘭𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘱𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘴. 𝘙𝘢𝘪𝘯 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘪𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳-𝘣𝘢𝘴𝘪𝘯 𝘴𝘬𝘺𝘭𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘪𝘧𝘦𝘴𝘵𝘴 𝘸𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘱𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘧𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘳. 𝘍𝘪𝘭𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘭𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘭𝘪𝘤𝘬𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘭𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘳𝘰𝘰𝘮 𝘧𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘳, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘢 𝘴𝘶𝘱𝘦𝘳 𝘭𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘸𝘦𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘤𝘶𝘳𝘵𝘢𝘪𝘯 𝘰𝘧 𝘴𝘱𝘶𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘳-𝘤𝘰𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘮𝘦𝘵𝘢𝘭 𝘥𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘯𝘥. 𝘈𝘭𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘭𝘰𝘤𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘥𝘰𝘸𝘯𝘵𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘪𝘯 𝘢 𝘤𝘪𝘵𝘺, 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘴𝘦 𝘦𝘯𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘦𝘴 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘦𝘯𝘫𝘰𝘺 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘭𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘤𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘮𝘰𝘰𝘥𝘴, 𝘢𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘱𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘭𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘸𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘴𝘦𝘢𝘴𝘰𝘯𝘴."
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harpoonn · 7 months ago
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Cool cat somewhere in the hills of Onomichi, Hiroshima.
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i learned that the city of Hiroshima, Japan distributes seeds and saplings of trees which survived the atomic bomb as a symbol of peace and resilience (x)
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takahashiyoshikazu · 8 months ago
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Itsukushima has lots of temples, and is famous for the Itsukushima Shrine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site⛩ And you can easily find many deers roaming freely all around 🦌 If you visit there, why not pet them 🍽
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karolpilberg · 3 months ago
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Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959) dir. Alain Resnais
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libraryjournal · 3 months ago
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Kudos to librarian Bruce Janu for discovering the rare August 31, 1946 New Yorker issue that featured John Hersey's groundbreaking and devastating report on the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.
Very few copies of the edition with the original band exist today, which is why, as Blume noted, it’s considered one of the “white whales” of the antiquarian-magazine world.
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blukcattalking · a month ago
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soldiers-of-war · 3 months ago
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A survivor of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare, Jinpe Teravama retains scars after the healing of burns from the bomb explosion in Hiroshima, in June 1947.
Photograph: Associated Press
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truecrimewitchpod · 4 months ago
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The Hiroshima Shadows 
On August 6th 1945 the world changed forever within a blink of an eye. Japan had no idea what was about to happen to them and the world looked on in horror. August 6th was the day that ‘Little Boy’ was detonated 1,900 feet above the city of Hiroshima. 
Residents who were going about their daily business saw a bright flash of light, followed by the heat that was 10,000F destroying anything in its path. The U.S had just released Little Boy over Hiroshima and had similar plans for Nagasaki. The U.S hoped that by weakening Japan they would force them to surrender and the war would finally be over. 
The U.S also wanted to show off to the world their new technology and used Hiroshima and Nagasaki as a warning to any other country who believed that they could take them on. When Little Boy was dropped, residents had little time to run for safety as the heat and clouds engulfed them. The most affected site was the Sumitomo Bank as it was closest to where the Little Boy was. 
The heat from Little Boy had been so intense that it had bleached everything in the immediate area, leaving shadows of anything that stood in its way. Perhaps the scariest and most famous photograph from this time is the photo of the Hiroshima Shadow Man. 
This photo shows the shadow of an elderly man who was sitting on the steps of the Sumitomo Bank, complete with the shadow of his walking stick. Hiroshima is dotted with shadows just like it, displaying people's final moments before their lives were taken. It wasn’t just people that left shadows behind either, bikes, water tanks and structures all left their mark. 
These shadows are well documented but the photo of the man on the steps is the one that we all associate with Hiroshima. The shadows remained there for decades until the wind and rain took their toll. 
However, the infamous shadow of the man sitting on the steps was removed and placed in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum where visitors are able to see the shadow up close and personal.
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i learned that the destruction of Hiroshima was caused by only half a gram of matter being converted to energy: the weight of a butterfly (x)
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yanderepuck · a year ago
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Can we just like.... acknowledge that today is when dumbass America dropped the bomb on Hiroshima.
I remember reading a book about 6 different people who survived the bomb and it's honestly heartbreaking.
America had NO RIGHT to drop the bomb. For one Japan was close to surrendering. And two, and most importantly, America bombed a city of innocent citizens only to prove a point, and people are still living with the after effects of the bomb.
Hiroshima also wasn't the only city that was attacked. Nagasaki was also bombed the same day, yet we speak of that even less.
America never warned Japan of the bombing
Because they feared that the Japanese would try to shoot down the planes.
War or not, that atomic bomb wasn't right
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theconcealedweapon · 6 months ago
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azspot · 25 days ago
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Hiroshima was bombed 76 years ago. There are many terrifying details about it. However, when I was learning about it, there’s something else that freaked me out even more: it’s that many Americans don’t see it as a war crime. Apparently it’s taught as something they “had to do.”
Dan
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whatevergreen · 4 months ago
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Hiroshima and Nagasaki: the cities, the survivors, and the dead... after the war crimes of the 1945 atomic bombings which killed over 280,000 civilians.
Despite the still popular misconception as a result of post-war propaganda, these bombings were not essential (nonsense that isn't even remotely justifiable) to stopping the war and "saving lives", and were only carried out to see what would happen to an urban population as a result, and as an expression of might by the US/Allies (the start of the Cold War).
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catdotjpeg · 3 months ago
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On Aug. 6 & 9, 1945, the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima & Nagasaki. The Korean A-Bomb Victims' Association estimates 100,000 of the 700,000 killed or injured by the bombs were Korean. Korean A-bomb survivors are still fighting for justice. This is their story.
In WWII, 5 - 7 million Koreans were conscripted as forced laborers throughout Japan's empire. 670,000 Koreans were sent to Japan to work in shipyards, arms factories, mines, farms, or as "comfort women."
In 1945, 80,000 Koreans lived in Hiroshima and at least 30,000 in Nagasaki. Most Hiroshima Koreans worked in war-related industries or farmed small plots after having lost their own land in Korea.
As colonial subjects, Koreans experienced widespread social discrimination, poverty, and lived in segregated neighborhoods. These factors contributed to their high rates of radiation exposure and death.
50,000 Koreans died in the atomic bombings or shortly after. Most of the 43,000 survivors returned to Korea. The Korea Atomic Bomb Casualty Association estimates 60% of survivor-returnees died of radiation-related illness or in the Korean War.
Survivors have faced many challenges in S. Korea. The ROK govt ignored survivors for decades. Many survivors & their children were disabled & unable to work or afford medical care. 20% of 2nd & 3rd-gen descendants of survivors have congenital deficiencies & hereditary diseases.
In 1957 Japan began to offer medical benefits to atomic bomb survivors, but excluded Koreans. Korean A-bomb survivors "illegally" crossed borders, filed lawsuits, and fought for decades to receive legal and medical rights in Japan. Some are still fighting to be recognized.
After WWII, the US refused responsibility for A-bomb survivors, but continued to test and station nuclear weapons throughout the Pacific. Korea is just one link in a long chain of US nuclear destruction, from mines in the Belgian Congo and Diné/Navajo lands to the Pacific.
Although most Korean A-bomb survivors left Japan for what became South Korea, about 3,000 went to North Korea. Japan has never compensated any A-bomb survivors in North Korea. Like all DPRK citizens, these survivors receive free medical care.
The decades-long struggle for Korean A-bomb survivors' rights is not over. To this day the Korean A-bomb Victims’ Association continues to [make demands.] Justice for Korean A-bomb survivors means more than reparations and recognition; it means an end to the US nuclear arsenal and the system of imperialism these weapons of mass destruction protect.
-- Nodutdol | 노둣돌, Aug 6 2021 
[IMAGE ID: 1. Photos of the mushroom clouds resulting from the atomic bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan. 
2. Photo of conscripted Korean workers at Hiroshima's Mitsubishi Shipyard in 1944.
3. An infographic which reads “As colonial subjects, Koreans had high rates of death and radiation exposure due to housing and medical discrimination. Koreans were crowded into downtown areas, closer to the blast sites. Koreans stayed in the cities after the bombings, while many Japanese took refuge with relatives in the country. Japanese hospitals turned away Korean victims who sought help.” 
4. Hapcheon memorial shrine, dedicated to the Korean victims of the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima. 
5. A screencap from a news report, showing a woman with a white ribbon tied around her head. The caption identifies her as “Yi Maeng-hee, a Korean A-bomb victim” and quotes her, saying “My children are in the same condition. One of them has been in the hospital for 6 years. There’s no one supporting us.”
6. An infographic which reads, “In 1957 Japan began to offer medical benefits to atomic bomb survivors, but excluded Koreans. Survivor Son Jin-doo illegally entered Japan to file a discrimination lawsuit and demand his benefits. He won his case in 1978. In order to receive benefits, survivors needed two witnesses, and at least one had to be a Japanese national. After 1952, all Koreans in Japan were stripped of Japanese citizenship. Most survivors living in South Korea couldn’t get visas to visit Japan. Not a single Korean received medical benefits from Japan until the 1970s.” A photo of Son Jin-doo is included. 
7. An infographic which reads, “After WWII, the US refused responsibility for A-bomb survivors, but continued to test and station nuclear weapons throughout the Pacific.” There is a photo of a mushroom cloud, captioned, “US nuclear test in the Marshall Islands. Marshallese people are still living with the effects [of] radiation in their homeland.” The infographic continues: “Until 1958 the US conducted 67 nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. As many as 950 nuclear missiles were stationed in South Korea from 1958-1991. The US also stationed nukes in the Philippines, Okinawa, Taiwan, Guahan, and Hawai’i.” 
8. An infographic outlining the demands of Korean A-bomb survivors: “1. Japan pay reparations and give medical treatment to Korean survivors and their descendants. 2. The US apologize, pay reparations, sign the treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, and denuclearize. 3. South Korea, Japan and the US recognize the impact of hereditary conditions on 2nd and 3rd generation survivors.” 
9. A photo of Sim Jintae, President of the Korean A-bomb Victims’ Association from 2015, and a quote reading: “I must hear the US apologize before I die, and I want to make sure my children can live without the threat of US nukes.”] 
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