Tumgir
#historical fashion
fashionsfromhistory · 5 hours ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Actress & Union Spy Pauline Cushman by the Mathew Brady Studio, 1864 (National Portrait Gallery)
574 notes · View notes
lotusinjadewell · a day ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Áo tấc. Credit to Hoàng Thị Thu Trà.
76 notes · View notes
a-hulder · a day ago
Photo
Tumblr media
we love to see it
33 notes · View notes
queermaddscientist · 11 months ago
Text
Get yourself a fabric store that will light your fabric on fire for you
No but legit I asked what the fiber content of something was and the guy didn’t know so he cut a chunk off and lit it on fire and felt the ashes and was like. Yeah this is mostly cotton with a lil bit of silk. And that was the moment I knew. This is it. This is the fabric store for me. Also that guy is marriage material. Not for me but damn some person is gonna be so happy with him.
88K notes · View notes
fdevitart · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
I have no new character design to show but this unnecessary thing I did two weeks ago.
And yes, I know that Howl maintains anonymity through his many different names but.
C'mon.
He would definitely plaster his face all over the city to show off.
16K notes · View notes
herbirdglitter · 9 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Nothing brings me more joy than people learning from history and then modernizing it up a bit.
Like you wanna grow your hair long? Stop washing it so often and brush it more to keep it clean. Your hair will be way healthier too. And stop cutting it (and use a boar bristle brush, it’ll work better as it’ll actually absorb the oils, distribute them better, and work a hell of a lot better than non-absorbent plastic would) Edit: Early on, some well meaning person kindly asked me to inform you that the boar bristle brush technique does not work on curly hair, however I have since been informed by multiple parties that it does! My hair is as straight as a pin so use your own judgment!
You want to keep cool in the summer? Out with the polyester and in with the linen and cotton. Natural fibers are going to keep you cooler because they’re literally made to breathe
You want to preemptively stop the underwire in your bra from poking through? There’s a very simple embroidery stitch you can do that the Edwardians used to do to stop their corset boning from coming through.
We don’t have to just learn from our ancestors mistakes, we can learn from their stakes too
41K notes · View notes
teatraysandtypewriters · 22 days ago
Text
One of my favorite hobbies is sending increasingly salty snapchats about the historical accuracy of romance novel covers. Here’s a few of my faves:
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
And, drumroll for the worst one I’ve ever seen …
Tumblr media
(Now with part 2)
6K notes · View notes
evermore-fashion · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Favourite Designs: LaceMade ‘Red Velvet Cake’ Corset II Museum Collection
6K notes · View notes
cy-lindric · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Milady de Winter
4K notes · View notes
zoesrepository · 9 months ago
Video
Tumblr media
Mila Povorozniuk
13K notes · View notes
gemsofgreece · 9 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
More photos from the beautiful project Ένδυμα ψυχής - Raiment of the Soul / A Voyage Within, a collaboration of the National Historical Museum of Greece with photographer Vangelis Kyris and Bulgarian embroidery artist Anatoli Georgiev, in which they present the folklore collection of the museum - outfits often belonging to important historical figures of Greece - through a series of photographs and embroidery art. The project, which consists of 120 photographs in its entirety, has been published in a photographic album you can buy from the shop of the museum. Link here.
Traditional dress of Kérkyra (Corfu) island.
Attire from Argos, Peloponnese, 19th Century.
Dress from Hydra island, owned by Kyriakoula Kriezi, wife to Greece's Prime Minister and Admiral Antonios Kriezis. 19th Century.
The vest and the legendary helmet of Theodoros Kolokotronis (1770- 1843), the General of the Greek War of Independence.
Attire of the famed beauty Katerina "Rosa" Botsari (1818-1872), daughter of war hero Markos Botsaris, and lady-in-waiting in the court of Queen Amalia of Greece.
Attire belonging to Dimitrios Voulgaris (1802-1877), kocabaṣı of Hydra island, then fighter in the Greek Independence War and later 8 times Prime Minister of Greece.
Traditional dress from Astypálea island, 19th Century.
A kid's attire from Archangelos of Rhodes island, 19th Century.
See more gorgeous photos here and here.
8K notes · View notes
fashionsfromhistory · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Dress
c.1873
Great Britain or France
The ruched skirt and draperies on this dress reverberate with intense colour, revealing the fashion for bright new synthetic dyes. Their inception owes much to the work of Sir William Henry Perkin (1838-1907), who discovered the first famous artificial colour by accident in 1856 when he was a student at the Royal College of Chemistry in London. While experimenting with a synthetic formula to replace the natural anti-malarial drug quinine, he produced a reddish powder instead of the colourless quinine. To better understand the reaction he tested the procedure using aniline and created a crude black product that ‘when purified, dried and digested with spirits of wine gave a mauve dye’. This dye created a beautiful lustrous colour that Perkin patented and which became known as ‘aniline violet’ or ‘mauveine’.
Perkin’s discovery led to a revolution in synthetic colour from the late 1850s onwards. Textile manufacturers soon turned to his aniline process and the resulting fabrics were characterised by an unprecedented brilliance and intensity that delighted the consumer. Women’s dresses acted as a perfect advertisement for these rich hues, especially as trimmings usually matched the colour of the gown. In August 1859 the satirical journal ‘Punch’ described the craze for purple as ‘Mauve Measles’, a disease which erupted in a ‘measly rash of ribbons’ and ended with the entire body covered in mauve. Soon other synthetic dyes were being produced with evocative names such as ‘acid magenta’, ‘aldehyde green’, ‘Verguin’s fuchine’, ‘Martius yellow’ and Magdela red’ to match their gaudy appearance. Dye analysis of this dress showed that the silk was coloured with synthetic dyes belonging to the methyl violet and aniline blue families of dyes.
Victoria & Albert Museum
549 notes · View notes
lotusinjadewell · 24 minutes ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Traditional costumes of H'Mong people subgroups (H'Mong Hoa & H'Mong Lenh). Credit to Hnubflower.
42 notes · View notes
iridessence · 7 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Pastel green 18th Century gown with a stomacher by L'Armoirede Mathilde, modeled by Bérénice
7K notes · View notes
die-rosastrasse · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Raimundo de Madrazo y Garreta
Spanish, 1841-1920
Portrait of a Lady, 1881 (details)
2K notes · View notes
fdevitart · 4 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
"Howl's Moving Castle but in the actual 1900s" is brought you by a small bonus drawing with Howl and Sophie doing cute couple sh*t.
6K notes · View notes
neatokeanosocks · a year ago
Photo
Tumblr media
You know what? peacock mantis shrimp but make it 1870s-1890s bustle fashion.
I don’t post art that often on this account anymore, so check out my current art account, @mjhartwork! I’ve also got a redbubble with merch of this piece
16K notes · View notes
sofflepoffle · a year ago
Text
Does anyone want to see the presentation I made on what historical fashion trends we should bring back and which should burn in hell I made for a PowerPoint party?
43K notes · View notes
evermore-fashion · 6 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Frieda Leopold ‘Historic Inspired’ Haute Couture Gowns [x][x]
13K notes · View notes
dresshistorynerd · 8 months ago
Text
An Introductory Timeline of Western Women's Fashion
I think a good place to start to get into dress history is general overview of the whole timeline. Understanding especially how the silhouettes change is really important ground knowledge to build the rest of the information on.
I'll start the timeline from Middle Ages and go till the first world war. I'll focus on upper class England/French sector, so keep in mind that before 17th century there were huge regional differences in fashion inside Europe and class differences too. There is a lot variance, changes and nuance inside any century and decade I'm about to discuss, but I'll try to keep this short and introductory and very simplified. I used a very scientific method of basically what makes most sense to me to divide the periods. I've made sketches what I would consider to be the basic silhouette of the period stripped mostly out of the detail and then I give couple of primary source examples.
12th century (Middle Ages)
Tumblr media
Dress was simple one or more tunics over a chemise. They were overly long for upper classes, made out of straight lines. There were loose tunics often worn over another tunic, and tunics with laced bodice called biaut. In France bliaut sleeves often widened from the elbow, in England they often widened in frists.
13th century (Middle Ages)
Tumblr media
Clothing was mostly very similar as in the previous century, though bliaut was mostly gone and new popular style was a loose sleeves surcoat.
14th century (Middle Ages)
Tumblr media
Tailoring basically revolutionized clothing production, since clothes weren't made out of rectangles anymore and could be better made to fit form. Also functional buttons and lacing was popularized resulting in very fitted styles. The underlayer tunic, kirtle, became a fitted supporting layer.
15th century (Middle Ages)
Tumblr media
Improvements in weaving technology and trade and growing prosperity in Europe showed in clothing as excess of fabric and variety of trends. Houppelande, a loose A-lined overdress lined with fur and fastened with a wide belt under chest, became a very popular clothing item, and in later decades developed into the iconic Burgundian dress (the red dress). Fitted overdress continued to be popular alongside the warmer houppelandes.
1500s-1550s (Tudor period)
Tumblr media
In the renaissance era clothing became increasingly structured and elaborate. The bodice was heavily boned and the skirt was also structured.
1560s-1610s (Elizabethan Era)
Tumblr media
Both structuring and elaborate decoration reach it's peak during Queen Elizabeth's reign. She became the defining fashion icon of the late renaissance.
1620s-1670s (Baroque)
Tumblr media
In baroque era the bodice was still heavily structured, but more curved than the conical Elizabethan bodice. Otherwise though structuring was replaces with dramatic excess of fabric.
1680s-1710s (Baroque)
Tumblr media
In the late 17th century there was a huge shift in the clothing industry as mantua, a loose open robe inspired by Japanese kimono, came to dominate fashion. Rigid bodice was replaces by structured under layer, stays. Stays brought back the conical silhouette of Elizabethan era.
1720s-1780s (Rococo)
Tumblr media
Mantua developed into the iconic Rococo dress in France, robe à la francaise (first example picture), and in England robe à la anglaise with closed bodice. Rococo fashion was characterized by the wide silhouette of the skirt.
Tumblr media
Since Tumblr won't accept more than 10 pictures per a post I'll have to continue in a reblog. So to be continued!
7K notes · View notes