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#historical sewing
queermaddscientist · 5 months ago
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Get yourself a fabric store that will light your fabric on fire for you
No but legit I asked what the fiber content of something was and the guy didn’t know so he cut a chunk off and lit it on fire and felt the ashes and was like. Yeah this is mostly cotton with a lil bit of silk. And that was the moment I knew. This is it. This is the fabric store for me. Also that guy is marriage material. Not for me but damn some person is gonna be so happy with him.
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memesandwitchcraft · 4 months ago
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I sewed a new 18th century shirt today based on this Bernadette Banner video. I absolutely adore it. https://youtu.be/Ql9r8UKIvZs
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havinghorns · 21 days ago
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Clearing out my phone and this one never made it to Tumblr...
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somuchbetterthanthat · a month ago
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It’s always “Corsets were a Symbol of Oppression That” and “Corsets were actually just underwear, that’s it, god stop making corsets the Evil of all Evils” this and sometimes there are a few words about chemises but like
why is nobody talking about the fact that for centuries women wore dresses and skirts /all the time/ but underpants weren’t a thing for them until super recently, which means that they had NO protection layer for thigh chaffing?? 
how did they deal with that?? surely they had to deal with that??? what was their SECRET?
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theladygruoch · a year ago
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Look I'm a pirate. And by pirate I mean member of the 1770s Continental Navy. By which I mean wearing a fancy outfit on a cool boat. Whichever way, I've got a little cannon and a big hat, and a cotton-print English gown I just finished last night.
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maybeindigo · 3 months ago
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This God Damn Shirt is finally finished, after redoing the shoulder width, the back, and the collar— at least the cuffs turned out pretty nice
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wellpresseddaisy · 9 months ago
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Seriously, I have to stay away from certain FB groups every time someone posts a 1920s sewing project because I know what I'm going to see:
"You have to be tall and slim to look good in 20s clothes"
"I have a shape like yours and I look awful in 20s clothes"
"You're so brave! The 20s are so hard to wear if you're not slim!"
And if I answered any of these peop!e the way wellVodka'd!Daisy wants to, I would be banned so fast.
So, to all in the historic and vintage communities who remark on anyone's 20s-based project like that, I offer a giant
Get fucked and eat my entire ass
If you think that's at all an appropriate way to respond to someone's hard work then you can take several seats.
And yes, I will be contacting the admins to express my displeasure at that kind of comment being considered appropriate.
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wastelesscrafts · a month ago
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Hi! I've been following this blog for a while and your suggestions and tutorials are so helpful! A while ago you mentioned (in a post about corsets I think) how there was a stitch people used to keep the corsets' ribs from sticking out and...well, there' a couple of nice bras that have been trying to skewer my poor tits for a while now, and I'd like help to stop them from doing that without having to put them in the trash bin. Can you share the corset-rib-taming stitch tutorial?
Always happy to hear my blog's helpful to people. :)
If the underwire of your bra is trying to stab you, check out my post on how to fix underwire bras to learn how to keep your underwear's bloodlust in check.
Corset flossing
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm going out on a limb here and assume this ask is about Tumblr-user Skuldsbane's comment on corset flossing on my underwire bra post.
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(Image source) [ID: Tumblr comment by @skuldsbane: "To help keep this from happening in the first place, take a page from our elders' book - look into corset flossing! The flossing is embroidery with a solid purpose. It was (and still is) used to keep the boning from moving around, and also helped to fortify the fabric at the end of the boning so that holes would not be rubbed through the fabric. Since the underwire of a bra is essentially causing the same problems with wearing holes through the fabric, the flossing serves the same purpose on underwire bras.]
Traditional corsets are usually boned (or corded) to give the wearer more support and to help the corset retain its shape.
Just like bras, corsets went trough daily wear and tear. Sometimes some of the boning would start to poke through, like underwires in bras. Corset flossing, a type of embroidery, was used to strengthen the parts of the fabric where the bones could poke through, and to keep them in place.
While flossing served a functional purpose, it was also used as an opportunity to add extra design details to a corset. If you're going to stitch something up, you might as well make it pretty.
I've personally never encountered a modern flossed bra before, but Skuldsbane's suggestion is a very interesting idea. Worth a try, I'd say!
If you'd like to learn more about flossing, take a look at these flossing tutorials by Sew Curvy and Sidney Eileen.
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(Image source) [ID: a boned black corset with black and white lace, embroidery, and ribbons, white flossing, and two blue garters.]
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(Image source) [ID: close-up of white flossing at the bottom edge of a black corset.]
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(Image source) [ID: a flossing sampler by Sidney Eileen showing multiple different flossing stitches on a beige piece of sample fabric.]
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(Image source) [ID: five flossing embroidery diagrams by Sidney Eileen.]
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lets-play-gwent · 10 months ago
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A historical sewing YouTuber: So. Let's talk about stripe width.
Me at 3:36am, inhaling content about my special interest like a starving dog: PLEASE tell me about STRIPE WIDTH,,,
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sonia-cosplay · 6 months ago
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Completed walking skirt + me flashing my ankles because I have pretty underwear.
The pattern is based on diagram 77 from “The Keystone jacket and dress cutter”, modified to make it more Edwaridian.
Please don’t mind the shoes, it was this pair or the Converse.
Facebook | Instagram | Tumblr | WorldCosplay | Twitter
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sewingthroughtime · 3 months ago
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Both the lining and the fashion fabric sleaves are almost done. I'm thinking about making a ln edwardian crochet purse with beading to go with it.
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I found a pattern for this purse and i plan on jazzing it up.
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drjohnweston · 7 months ago
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I haven't shared this here yet but I made an 1880s corset!
I made the camisole top underneath exactly 1 year ago during the first Lockdown, a proper era appropriate chemise is next on my sewing list, but as I have written out my to-do list today for all the work stuff I have to fit in over the next month it might be awhile before it gets made!
Pattern is from Black Snail Patterns on Etsy and the embroidery design is my own based on several different extant examples
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theladygruoch · 10 months ago
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1730s robe volante based on this dress in the 1731 Declaration of Love by Jean-François de Troy, one of my favorite paintings and dresses. I love the aesthetics of the 1730s, although they get so little attention for being so fab. The volante is the ancestor of the iconic mid-century robe a la francaise, roughly differentiated from its later form with wide sleeves, broad pleats in front and back, and a closed front, but there's a lot of variation. My version is fitted through the sides, but it still obscures my figure enough to make me feel like a beautiful brocade mountain! This style makes you feel so dominant and powerful, taking up space and lugging piles of fabric everywhere. Manspreaders only wish they could get on this level.
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