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So I’m a bit of an ancient history buff who is expanding into other areas of history. I mostly enjoy learning about military campaigns and how the people of certain ages in history went about their daily lives. I was thinking once of twice a month, I could do either a video blog or a text blog about whatever history catches my eye. What do you guys think? If it’s something you’re interested in let me know and I’ll see what I can do for you. 

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¡Deseo que el idioma aranés se esté extinguiendo! 😇

El occitano (dialecto aranés) sobrevive en el noreste de Hispania, pero en Valonia y Hesperia no sobrevive. 😀

Y creo que el occitano suena como el portugués y el catalán tuvieron un bebé discapacitado. 😂😂

Rocco Gallo dice que odia la política del idioma francés, así como el italiano.

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BAQUEIRA-MORET

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Lore and World Building

So throughout my writing experience, I’ve realised I’m really good at world building and lore. I’ll be using my WIPs as examples for some things, and mentioning some elements. Feel free to be inspired by some! I give you full permission to borrow some of these ideas for you own WIPs! I’m being as vague as possible anyway, so the chances of you 100% taking the idea are slim.

This is very long so I’ll put it under a break!

Keep reading

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Would you happen to know if there's any evidence for bustles being inspired the figure of Saarjie Baartman aka the "Hottentot Venus"? Or is this more of a correlation ≠ causation thing?

I’ve never really considered it a viable theory myself. Skirts with bustle-like back fullness predated Baartman’s birth, most notably in the 1690s, and both waves of bustle popularity were decades after her death. Furthermore, no such fashion existed during her lifetime (1789-1815). 

The bustle seems to have been a natural skirt shape progression from the elliptical hoops of the late 1860s, that perhaps hearkened back to 17th-century trends a bit. Nothing more.

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1. My Great, Great Grandparents (seated) with their children - one of the standing men is my Great Grandfather, Joseph Henry Parker - Born 1884 (d. 1977), which could make this picture early 1900s. (click for a better view)
2. The reverse, advertisement for the photographer Horace H Dudley - Burton is circled, so I could assume that is the studio they went to for this picture.

3. The same Great Grandparents seated with “Auntie Elsie” standing (the same girl from the first picture) - from Elsie’s dress, I assume this is about 1919 or further into the 1920s.
2. The reverse, typical post card backing of pictures of the 1920s. Says “At the old back door”.

My parents inherited these pictures after my Nana passed away at the age of 93 (born 1925), they refer to her husband’s family. The first picture was definitely taken in England, but I’m not sure about the second. I know that my Poppa’s father emigrated to New Zealand, but I don’t know if his sister and parents joined him. The ‘old back door’ could therefore be a house in England OR New Zealand.

zeehasablog
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August, 1942.

Women in industry.

1-2. Aircraft motor workers. A million dollar baby, not in terms of money but in her value to Uncle Sam, twenty-one-year-old Eunice Hancock, erstwhile five-and-ten-cent store employee, operates a compressed-air grinder in a Midwest aircraft motor plant. With no previous experience, Eunice quickly mastered the techniques of her war job and today is turning out motor parts with speed and skill. Note protective mask and visor, two vital safety accessories

3. Tool production. With no previous industrial experience, this young woman has taken over a delicate job in a large Midwest drill and tool company. Her part in America’s war production consists of grinding small drills to a high tolerance on this clearance-grinding machine. Republic Drill and Tool Company, Chicago, Illinois.

4. Tool production. Arms for the love of America! The capable young woman whose strong hands guide this cutoff machine is one of a Midwest drill and tool factory’s many women employees. Almost 1,000 women have recently been employed in this comparatively new plant; sole men workers, other than foreman, are those in the heat treating department. Republic Drill and Tool Company, Chicago, Illinois.

5. Aircraft motor workers. Scarlet fingernails give emphasis to the important work that feminine fingers are doing on this inspection line. Performing a delicate and repetitive job, women at this Midwest aircraft motor plant use dial indicator gauges in the process of inspection of ball sockets used in airplane motors.

6. Tool production. Her mind’s on her work and on her country. That small flag tells the story of this young woman’s absorption in her job. Employed by a Midwest drill and tool plant, she’s grinding points on drills which will be used in the production of America’s ships and planes and guns. A soldier of the production front, she fights for the men on America’s battlefronts. Republic Drill and Tool Company, Chicago, Illinois.

7. Tool production. Trained to catch the tiniest defect in the smallest drill, this attractive, young inspector in a large Midwest drill and tool plant is doing valuable work for the war effort. These drills, used in the manufacture of every kind of war machinery, must be perfect so that America’s planes and ships and tanks can be built to exact specifications. Republic Drill and Tool Company, Chicago, Illinois.

8. Aircraft motor workers. Youthful Paderewskis, take note! Her finger made superbly flexible by years of piano practice, this young employee of a Midwest aircraft motor plant finds her musical training of great assistance in her war job. The operation of this drill press demands constant, rapid hand and wrist movement–and that’s where those hours of do-re-mi are paying dividends. She’s countersinking six holes in a bolt, an operation requiring great precision, speed and skill.

9. Tool production. Testing small diameter, high-speed twist drills, this young woman employed by a Midwest drill and tool company is one of America’s women “behind the men behind the guns.” Drills must be perfectly made so that the nation’s war weapons can be built to accurate specifications. Republic Drill and Tool Company, Chicago, Illinois.

10. Tool production. Eyes averted from the white shower of sparks, this young employee of a drill and tool plant touches the button that welds drills to their shanks. She’s one of nearly 1,000 women who have replaced men at the production machines of this Midwest factory. Republic Drill and Tool Company, Chicago, Illinois.

Photographer: Ann Rosener

Library of Congress lot: 1982

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