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#history of fashion
ruched · 3 months ago
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Callot Soeurs Autumn/Winter 1928
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• Party dress.
Date: ca. 1954
Medium: Silk, organza
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tomcraweley · 3 months ago
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I think The Gilded Age costumes referenced these...
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thisprettyukrainianletter · a month ago
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Народні костюми із Закарпаття
1. Закарпатська область, Великоберезнянський район 2.Закарпатська бласть, Міжгірський район 3.Закарпатська область, Іршавський район 4.Закарпатська область Великоберезнянський район 5.Закарпатська область, Виноградівський район
Автор проекту: Оксана Малюкова   
Author of the project: Oksana Malyukova
Folk outfits from Zakarpattya (Ukrainian part of Transcarpathia)
1. Zakarpattya region, Velykobereznyansky district 2. Zakarpattya blast, Mizhhirya district 3. Zakarpattya region, Irshava district 4. Zakarpattya region, Velykobereznyansky district 5. Zakarpattya region, Vynohradiv district
Source
For:
@mckingly
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antoniettabrandeisova · 2 months ago
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The Tea Party (detail), George Goodwin Kilburne (British, 1839-1924)
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fabrics of the 18th century
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just-art5 · 8 months ago
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Jacques-Émile Blanche - The Reader, 1890 
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thecinamonroe · 12 months ago
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Marilyn Monroe by the pool in a village in Westwood Village, May 26, 1950. Photo by Bob Beerman. 
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heaveninawildflower · a month ago
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Some of the generations of the Derrer family taken from ‘Genealogy of the Derrer Family’ (Germany, circa 1626–1711) by Georg Strauch (German, 1613 - 1675).
Tempera colours with gold and silver highlights.
Images and text information courtesy The Getty.
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armthearmour · a year ago
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In addition to my interest in historical arms and armor, and pursuant to my desire to abandon modern society and live as a medieval knight, I also have an interest in historical fashion. It is an interest that doesn't frequently bleed over onto this blog, since it isn't strictly relevant, but this particular example is an exception.
While rereading The Noble Art if the Sword by Dr. Tobias Capwell, my attention was called to the above suit, made for the Elector of Saxony Christian II some time in the first decade of the 17th century. It is currently housed at the Dresden armory.
This suit is relevant to Dr. Capwell's book, and my blog, for one very specific reason.
During the heyday of the rapier, matching the sword to the suit was an extremely fashionable way of showing off one's wealth and status.
Those of you who have followed my blog for some time will recognize the rapier which follows, a piece which we are extraordinarily lucky to have.
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With a hilt cast from solid silver and delicately enameled in a vibrant blue, the fact that this rapier was made for the Saxon Elector around the same time as the previously mentioned suit, and the clear parallels in elements of their design and color palette suggest strongly that this unique rapier may have been designed to be worn with the above suit.
The utterly unique nature of each of these objects, one as a near complete upper status ensemble made over 400 years ago, the other as what may be the only fully enameled rapier in existence, makes each if them remarkable in their own rights. That it is strongly possible they may have been made specifically to complement one another, renders them truly astounding.
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old-poland · a month ago
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Portrait of Helena Popiel, Warsaw, Poland, ca 1871
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ruched · 19 days ago
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Christian Lacroix Fall 1991
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lookingbackatfashionhistory · 2 months ago
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• Day dress.
Date: 1890-1899
Medium: Printed off-white wool in purple violets and green leaf pattern.
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tomcraweley · 2 months ago
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Anne Lister's costumes in "Gentleman Jack" ~
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gotht · 11 months ago
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antoniettabrandeisova · 8 days ago
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Portrait of a seated lady, in a velvet dress, Vittorio Matteo Corcos (Italian, 1859–1933)
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polish-aristocracy · 3 months ago
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Leonia Rastawiecka, née Nakawska (1818-1886), Polish noblewoman.
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just-art5 · 8 months ago
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Merry-Joseph Blondel - Felicite-Louise-Julie-Constance de Durfort, 1808 (detail)
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thecinamonroe · 11 months ago
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Marilyn Monroe at Mocambo Club in Los Angeles on October 25, 1951.
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professorpski · 9 months ago
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Dress in the Age of Jane Austen
This book by Hilary Davidson comes to us through Yale University Press, so it is a deep dive into the clothing of the era, both men’s and women’s. I got it right before the Art Institute of Chicago was about to do a show on late 18th Century fashion, right before the Regency which is technically 1811 to 1820 but which is often thought of as very late 18th century to the 1837.
This book is organized thinking geographically, so it starts with a chapter called Self which is really about the body and how it was or was not on display, then  goes through Home, Village, Country, City, Nation, and ends with World which gives us the great global trade which brought Indian and other textiles from across the seas. Along the way, we have plenty of images as you can see above and Davidson traces fashion construction and the sources that influenced it, all while referencing what we know about Austen and about what she wrote.
So you see lots of global influences in the saucy women in the gold coat with military trimming was made of Merino cloth from Spain and Astrakhan fur and her cap was styled after an Algerian helmet according to the caption that went with it in 1811. Then, you see how a woman of 77 would appear in the portrait of Hannah Moore from 1822 by Henry William Pickersgill who wore an abundance of ruffles near her face. A nice softening effect near older skin. Then you see a close-up detail of the fabric of an evening gown, all hand-embroidered, and a pattern for a similar kind of embroidery. Davidson draws attention to both the enormous amount of time and the fine skill needed to pull such a creation off.
There is plenty on men from their fancy waistcoats to their military uniforms--remember when the regiment meant to much to the Bennets? --to their caped coats. The book ends with the Austen family tree, a time-line of changes in gowns, and a full glossary of the technical terms. In short, lots to see and learn, and plenty of references to the many ways fashion shows up in Austen’s books and in the age of Regency.
You can find it here: https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300218725/dress-age-jane-austen
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