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callonpeevesie · a day ago
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Bengali rhymes (ছড়া) are so fascinating to me like,,, they're loaded with stories, history in its rawest form,,, you can hear the voices of common people, especially women, from generations, maybe centuries ago, who were forgotten but left their imprints on the world all the same. (Not to be a broken record on main but that's what history is!! It's remembering, it's looking back and knowing you're not alone!)
I mean,,,
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^ these are some of my favourites because they give me many Feels. If I was more comprehensible I could make observations on how they provide insights to the lives of the women who made them, their love for their children, their domestic lives, their pain in their married lives, customs important to them like jamai shashthi, their colloquial language.
But rn I'm losing my mind because of how, idk, how tangible it is, how you can read these and Feel the emotions of the women who made them? Mothers trying to put their babies to sleep or comforting them or just fawning over them, maybe tired after a long day but full of love for their children. Or young women crying silently over the oven, unable to tell anyone how they're suffering at their in-laws. Or slightly older women feeling done™ when their husbands are being dumb or neighbours disrupt their chores. Idk I just have so many feels help
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disc80s · a year ago
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it’s the “date of birth: 1303 BC” for me...
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historiacombativa · 9 months ago
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So the 13th was my 2nd year anniversary with my partner in crime and he gifted me this beautiful knife 🗡 I love it very much🤎
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almostreading · 11 months ago
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Essay writing on a saturday morning
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encyclopedia-amazonica · a month ago
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Yamamoto Yaeko - Heroic defender of Aizu
If you want to read about another heroine of this battle, you can check out my article on Nakano Takeko.
In autumn 1868 the domain of Aizu, Japan, was under attack by the imperial troops. Women within the castle actively took part in the defense. 
They prepared ammunition, cooked meals, nursed the wounded, but also risked their lives in extinguishing the fires and rushed to cover the enemy canon balls with wet mats before they exploded. Young girls also collected the enemy ammunition for the defenders to reuse it. A 60 years old woman went out of the castle to retrieve food, but encountered an enemy soldier on the way. She stabbed him with her dagger and safely went back to the castle. A female bodyguard unit also protected Matsudaira Teruhime, the lord’s sister.
Some of them also fought. A contemporary witness depicts them as ready to don their white kimono and fight naginata  in hand. An observer also said that they shared all the men’s burden, took on watches and shouldered a rifle if needed.
Among them was Yamamoto Yaeko (1845-1932), who distinguished herself through her leadership and her skills with firearms, though she wasn’t the only woman to use  them in the defense. She was the daughter of an artillery instructor and her brother Kakuma had taught her to use firearms. She was particularly competent, being able to use recent models like the Spencer rifle and had also learned to fight with a naginata. 
On October 8, Yaeko began to take part in night sorties. She had asked another female defender, Takagi Tokio, to cut her hair short like a male samurai. Armed with her Spencer rifle, she was dressed like a man and had two swords at her belt. She also commanded the men in charge of one of the cannons and didn’t abandon her post, even as cannon balls rained on the castle.
In spite of this fierce resistance, Aizu surrender on November 5, 1868. In an ultimate gesture of defiance, Teruhime ordered the women to clean the whole castle in order to humiliate the enemy as soon as they would set a foot in it and to show that the Aizu spirit was still unbroken. 
When the castle fell, Yaeko was made prisoner with the men. After being freed, she divorced from her first husband went to Kyoto to find her brother Kakuma. There, she met and married Nijima Jô, converted to Christianity and helped him to found Doshisha university. She later became a nurse for the Red Cross and served as such during the Russo-Japanese war in 1905. Another woman who fought in Aizu’s defense, Yamakawa Futaba, also became a promoter of women’s education.
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(Yamamoto Yaeko in her later years, c.1929)
Today, a statue of Yamamoto Yaeko can be seen in Aizu. There’s also a TV-show based on her life: Yae no Sakura. 
Here’s the link to my Ko-Fi if you want to support me.
Bibliography:
Shiba Gorô, Remembering Aizu: the testament of Shiba Gorô
“Samurai warrior queens” documentary
Wright Diana E., “Female combatants and Japan’s Meiji restauration: the case of Aizu”
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matthias-researches · a month ago
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Tuesday, 17th of August 2021
Would anyone be interested if I started vlogging and making history videos? I’ve been thinking about it.
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historiacombativa · a year ago
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“When all we see in art history is a male-dominated white heaven, we become the inferior to this gender and cultural imperialism” -Harmonia Rosales
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“The creation if god”
“Summer”
“The birth of Oshun”
“The birth of eve”
All by Harmonia Rosales
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the---hermit · 24 days ago
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Old pictures of when I was studying for my archeology class.
01|08|2021
Happy September everyone! Today I finally had my late antiquity and early archeology exam. I passed with 25/30, I was honestly hoping for something better, but the prof asked me tough questions, so it's fine. I can't wait to take a couple days off and then organize my next months. After my exam in the morning my parents had to go to ikea to buy some stuff so I tagged along to get a couple of items for my study, and I am now taking a break after assembling them. After this, I'm going to put on an audiobook and organize everything in the study! I'm quite tired, but excited to organize my space.
🎵: In The Dark by Flyleaf
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encyclopedia-amazonica · 2 months ago
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Ahhotep - The queen who protected Egypt
Ahhotep ( c.1560–1530 BCE) was the queen consort of pharaoh Seqenenre Tao II.  She apparently gave birth to two daughters and two sons. Her husband died in battle against the Hyksos, foreign invaders who at that time ruled Northern Egypt. 
A man named Kamose then ascended to the throne. Whether or not he had ties to the royal family or was a warrior of noble birth is unclear. Kamose died in battle against the Hyksos three years later. Ahhotep’s son, Ahmose I, then became pharaoh.
Ahhotep ruled in his stead as a regent. According to a stela recovered from Karnak, she was “one who has accomplished the rites and taken care of Egypt”. The queen also appears to have led troops in battle to defend her capital of Thebes against the Hyksos. The stela indeed says that:
“She has looked after Egypt's soldiers, she has guarded Egypt, she has brought back her fugitives and gathered together her deserters, and she has pacified Upper Egypt and expelled her rebels.”
Her grave goods indeed suggest an active military role. She was buried with three daggers and thirteen axes bearing both the names of Ahmose I and Kamose as well as an archer’s brace and a javelin head. A military decoration, the golden “Flies of Valor”’, was also found in her tomb. This decoration was usually awarded to someone who personally excelled in battle. 
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(Some of Ahhotep’s burial goods, including the golden flies)
Bibliography: 
Dean Rebecca A., Women, weaponry and warfare A multidisciplinary study of the use of weapons by women in Dynastic Egypt 
Tyldesley Joyce, Chronicle of the queens of Egypt
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vanwssa · 10 days ago
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[…] Don’t squander the gold of your days, listening to the tedious, trying to improve the hopeless failure, or giving away your life to the ignorant, the common and the vulgar. These are the sickly aims, the false ideas, of our age. Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing.
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890).
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