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#horticultural
ostrichrevolution · 2 years ago
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The fact that corn, poatoes, tomatoes, pumpkins, blueberries, garden strawberries, and chocolate weren't encountered by Europeans until less than 400 years ago is astonishing.
Like white folks became so dependant on the hundreds of years of labor that Native Americans put into domesticating these crops and now they're so removed culturally from their origins that they've become inherant parts of white culture.
When you think of tomatoes do you think of Mexican, or Italian food? When you think of potatoes can you picture the Quechua or the UK, Russia, France maybe? Does chocolate make you think of Belgian and Swiss truffles, or Olmec cacao?
Pumpkin may be the oldest domesticated plant but it doesn't evoke images of the ancient Native peoples of the southern US. It's white girls with pumpkin spice lattes and white mom's pumpkin pie.
I don't really know where I'm going with this but it makes me feel things
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conspectusargosy · 3 years ago
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Azalea flower in UVIVF. When I looked at these with my older weaker light, I didn’t see much going on. I like them now though!
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isthataleaf · 3 years ago
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filled up this pot a bit
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crypto-botanist · 3 years ago
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Indian pipes (monotropa uniflora)
Indian pipes, ghost pipes, corpse plant, or ghost plant? Whatever you know this plant as, it remains to be a curious specimen. This herbaceous plant is often mistaken for some kind of fungi, but is in fact a flowering plant. As its name implies, each stem has a single flower head with semi-transparent petals. This plant never ceases to amaze me! 👻👻👻
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bobcatmoran · 7 months ago
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This is one of the best explanations I’ve seen of the sheer insanity that is cultivated Brassica oleraceae, aka cabbage, kale, broccoli, kohlrabi, brussels sprouts, and cauliflower.
Yes, they are all the SAME SPECIES.
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jillraggett · a month ago
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Plant of the Day
Wednesday 16 June 2021
This week I have seen the annual Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) flowering in gardens and in an urban setting by a major road. The flower colour is variable with shades of red, pink, mauve, purple, white and nearly black. The seed capsule enlarges after flowering making a decorative feature for the winter.
Jill Raggett
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minecraft-inspo · 5 months ago
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Build inspired conceptually by the hanging garden of Babylon and architecturally by Mesoamerican pyramids. I’ve been working on this for the last couple weeks, but I was waiting for all the new plants to finish it!
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amoebasisters · 2 years ago
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Do you know your monocots and dicots? Here's our cheat sheet!
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isthataleaf · 2 years ago
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green pothos cuttings!
gonna root them in water before putting them back with the original plant
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regnum-plantae · 3 years ago
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After all these years, the Tropical Pond House at Glasgow Botanic Gardens is still one of my favourite places in the city. It just makes you forget you’re in Scotland and gives anybody the opportunity to feel like they are somewhere far away, along with the chance to observe plants you’d have to travel across the world to see in a natural state. I could spend an entire day in there. Don’t miss it if you ever come visit!  
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jillraggett · 2 years ago
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Plant of the Day
Thursday 4 April 2019
Through the Botanic Garden at Wakehurst, Sussex, for just over a kilometre, runs a series of outcrops forming small cliffs made of Ardingly Sandstone and growing over these can be seen the amazing root systems of Taxus baccata (yew).
Jill Raggett
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crypto-botanist · 3 years ago
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Carnivorous plant greenhouse, Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park 🌿🏠🌿 dream house 🌿🏠🌿
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weirdlandtv · 2 years ago
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Illustrations from CUPID’S ALMANAC AND GUIDE TO HEARTICULTURE (1908). By Oliver Herford and John Cecil Clay.
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naturallhappiness · a year ago
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lil baby hanging out in the nasturtium
(he had actually just caught a grasshopper and kept walking further into the bushes when i tried to get him)
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jillraggett · a year ago
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Plant of the Day
Sunday 8 March 2020
In the fantasy kitchen of the Giant Houseplant Takeover in the glasshouse of the Royal Horticultural Society Garden Wisley, Surrey, Nepenthes 'Miranda' (pitcher plant) was part of the display. This perennial, carnivorous tropical plant has red speckled pitchers with a reddish brown lip and is a hybrid between Nepenthes maxima and Nepenthes northiana, both species are from Southeast Asia.
Jill Raggett
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regnum-plantae · 2 years ago
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How I recruited a small army of ladybugs
In my last post, a reblog from last year, I mentioned the cut conifers to be sold as Christmas trees had started arriving at the garden centre where I work, but together with the trees we also received some visitors. 
As of October, ladybugs (Coccinella septempunctata) begin congregating in sheltered places to spend their winter dormancy period, a time when their mobility and activity level are strictly dependant on the temperature, and it seems a large number of them had chosen the dense, evergreen foliage of the Nordmann firs (Abies nordmanniana) to do so. Whenever I would free a tree from its net, shaking it, several ladybugs (as well as a variety of spiders) would fall to the floor, suddenly thrown out of their cosy temporary home. 
I collected and placed dozens of them around the garden centre, where they will be valuable allies in my battle against aphids next year, but I also decided to relocate some of them to my allotment. I had one of those boxes sold as “butterfly houses” installed on a south-facing portion of the fence, and I thought it could serve well for the purpose of giving them shelter, so I filled it with some bamboo sticks and placed them inside to see what they would do. 
They seem to find it suitable, the following day the box was still full and the majority had climbed up to rest under the roof. If all goes well, they will spend the winter there, and when they emerge they will find the place to be a good breeding site, which will also, inexorably, be filled with food for them.
Aphids, mites and all of you, soft-bodied insects, cower before my army now!     
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