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#hubble telescope
spacewonder19 · a day ago
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Close-up of Dumbbell Nebula
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lionfloss · 25 days ago
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Aurora on Saturn
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maxsix · 5 months ago
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Centre of the Cosmic Reef Nebula | Original photography from the Hubble Space Telescope
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herenowdeepinsideigo · 3 months ago
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Make sure you pick the best filter 📸
This photo of a barred spiral galaxy 48 million light-years from Earth, taken by @NASAHubble, is a cosmic wonder. In its original form, though, it wouldn't look nearly as dazzling—raw images from Hubble and other space telescopes come in shades of gray, only showing the amount of light captured across all wavelengths the telescope's camera can measure.
In order to turn those images into colorful sights like this one, we take photos with special filters that block out almost all wavelengths of light. One of the filters used on this image sees only light that would appear green to human eyes: light at wavelengths around 555 nanometers. The final multicolor image you see here uses data from seven different filters, collected with Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys.
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Sand, K. Sheth
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politishaun · 2 months ago
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A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, there was a large and magnificently brilliant star that shined across the young, expanding universe. The starlight skewed blue. It was the cosmic morning, when everything in the universe was still new, raw, the galaxies still forming not long after the first stars had ignited and lit up the heavens.
The light from that blue star traveled through space for billions of years, and then one day a few thin beams crashed into a polished mirror — the light bucket of the Hubble Space Telescope.
In a report published Wednesday in the journal Nature, a team of astronomers asserts that this is the most distant individual star ever seen. They describe it as 50 to 100 times more massive than our sun, and roughly 1 million times brighter, with its starlight having traveled 12.9 billion years to reach the telescope.
The lead author on the report, Brian Welch, a 27-year-old doctoral candidate at Johns Hopkins University, had the honor of giving the star a name: Earendel. It’s an Old English word, meaning “morning star,” he said. Earendel was found in a young galaxy known as the Sunrise Arc, and “morning star” seemed appropriate, Welch said.
“And it sounds cool,” he added. Moreover, “Earendil” is the name of a character in J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Silmarillion,” which also inspired the name, Welch said.
“This is one of the major discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope in its 32 years of observation,” said Rogier Windhorst, an Arizona State University astronomer and a co-author of the report.
Found in the constellation Cetus near the star Mira, Earendel’s light was emitted about 900 million years after the universe began its expansion — the big bang. If that estimated distance holds up to further scrutiny, the starlight would have been emitted nearly 4 billion years further back in the universe’s history than that of the most distant individual star previously seen.
In recent decades, astronomers have seen galaxies at that distance, and even farther away, but galaxies are collections of billions of stars and the very distant ones have typically been nothing more than smudges of light.
As with any stunning claim, this carries caveats and uncertainties, starting with the possibility that it is not a singular star at all. It’s possible Earendel is a pair of stars, or even a trio or more, a common stellar phenomenon in which one bright member of the group does most of the illumination. (Alpha Centauri, the closest sun-like star, is part of a triplet).
Another possibility is that Earendel is, at its core, a black hole — the remnant of a massive individual star that has collapsed. Black holes are invisible, of course, but their gravity can lure rapidly moving and visible material, known as an accretion disk.
“The object is real. It’s not a smudge. There is something there,” Windhorst said. “The question is, whatever object is there, what is it really?”
What it definitely is, is a target for the newly launched James Webb Space Telescope, the Hubble’s successor.
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kkdas · 5 months ago
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'HUBBLE VIEWS''
THE BEST IMAGES OF SPACE!
These fantastically real images of the universe include: The Sombrero Galaxy (infrared), the Ring Nebula, the Spiral Galaxy NGC 1566, the NGC 5195, the Veil Nebula and the Andromeda Galaxy.
Credit: NASA/HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE
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cavalierzee · 15 days ago
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Saturn In UV
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Courtesy of: Hubble Telescope
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sushi11 · 11 months ago
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A reflection nebula in orion
Credit : NASA/ ESA and Hubble heritage team
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bent-rod · 4 months ago
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“Crab Nebula”
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spacewonder19 · 2 months ago
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Lagoon in infrared 
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without-ado · a month ago
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Westerlund 2 l Hubble
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lionfloss · 25 days ago
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A "Rose" Made of Galaxies Highlighted Hubble's 21st Anniversary
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maxsix · 5 months ago
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ARP-MADORE0002-503 (top) is a large three-arm-spiral galaxy with a distance of 490 million light-years, making it three times larger than our Milky Way Galaxy. 
ARP-MADORE2115-273 (bottom) is a rare pair of interacting galaxies, seen in the Southern Hemisphere, and located 297 million light years away from Earth. 
Original photography from The Hubble Space Telescope, via Hubblesite. 
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loxias · 4 months ago
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Messier's Secrets 106. The NASA / ESA Hubble Space Telescope, with the help of an amateur astronomer, produced one of the best views ever seen of the spiral galaxy Messier 106.
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visionsofour-past · a month ago
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• Glass positive of Hubble’s classification of ‘nebulae’.
Date: 1930
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kkdas · 5 months ago
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The Carina Nebula, 7500 light-years away.
photo by Hubble Space Telescope
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ghostly-spaghetti · 6 months ago
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i think this is important
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sunflowerspacesoup · 2 months ago
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Good morning my lovelies ☀️ I hope you all have a lovely day ♡ Also happy 32nd anniversary of the hubble telescope being deployed into space, like yeah your primary mirror was flawed which caused quite a mess of a situation but even though you failed at first you are still going strong this many years later and I am proud of you <3
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bent-rod · 6 months ago
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“Shark Nebula”
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