Tumgir
#human bones
Photo
Tumblr media
29 notes · View notes
lionfloss · 28 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
The Hill of Slain by Ted Nasmith
531 notes · View notes
archaeologicalnews · a month ago
Text
Human bones used for making pendants in the Stone Age
Tumblr media
In the Stone Age, pendants with potent symbolism were made from animal teeth and bones, adorning clothes or accessories and serving as rattles. Human bones were also used as a raw material for pendants, as demonstrated by a study where burial finds dating back more than 8,200 years were re-examined after 80 years.
Appearing in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, the finding is quite a sensation, as the objects are simple pieces of bone with one or several grooves cut into them. In a previous study, the bones were classified as animal bones.
The pendants made of human bone raise many questions: Whose bones were they made of and how were the bones acquired? Did the people wearing the pendants know whose bones they were made of? Did the origin of the bones make a difference? Read more.
206 notes · View notes
zgoodwitchbitch · a month ago
Text
Tumblr media
282 notes · View notes
putrid0 · 2 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
135 notes · View notes
ochipi · 4 months ago
Text
Things you can/should ask an archaeologist
If kids like history and you are concerned or uncertain about historical jobs, we are happy to help. Especially when the kids themselves are there
Ask us first if you can enter the site, we’ll be more approachable
Ask us what time period we are working on rather than “how old is this”. You’ll have a better time reference
Ask us about what we are expecting to find rather than what we’ve found already. You’ll sound less “treasure hunter-y”.
Sometimes there’s a local among the team, they’ll be happy to provide an in depth explanation to the site
You can ask where the finds will go to. It shows us you’re kind of familiar with archaeology and know the right questions. Or ask about the cleaning/storing process
Actual field archaeologists are often not specialized in something you can use on the field all the time, so asking about what we specialized in during our university time isn’t always helpful. But you can ask without problem what options different universities provide based on what you are interested in.
People often ask about it out of concern, but you can ask about what will happen to the site and not just the finds.
116 notes · View notes
strangebiology · 28 days ago
Text
Addressing misleading headlines, dead people, and TikTok
My brand!
Here’s the series of articles that I believe originally uncovered this case, and has tons of crazy info in it: https://www.reuters.com/investigates/section/usa-bodies/
In which the journalists buy human heads for $200 each. And no, they didn’t have to pose as medical professionals.
Edit: @janeandthehivequeen says the podcast Criminal also has a good episode on this case. In case you just want to learn about the Sunset Mesa funeral home and not read a big long (but excellent) series about the body trade.
67 notes · View notes
for-a-few-westerns-more · 9 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Cimitero delle Fontanelle (Napoli, Italia)
206 notes · View notes
colecats · a year ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media
Fox jaw and human wrist bone
195 notes · View notes
tidalion · 7 months ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Just doing fine.
95 notes · View notes
morb1dcxrpse · 8 months ago
Text
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
Tumblr media
a human rib ♡
32 notes · View notes
Photo
Tumblr media
Vision of the Valley with the Dry Bones (1866) by  Gustave Doré
58 notes · View notes
Text
Tumblr media
Reflection on the physical evolution of man
7 notes · View notes
badgalnirvhannah · a month ago
Photo
Tumblr media Tumblr media Tumblr media
happy birthday to the amazing jeff 🤘🏻🥳
ig: badmotorartist 
7 notes · View notes
magg0tbby · 3 months ago
Text
Tumbling doll
8 notes · View notes
httpsihate3verythingpng · 5 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
Take me home
10 notes · View notes
neglathag · 3 months ago
Text
Tumblr media
San Bernardino alle Ossa (Milán) Italy
The church's origins date to 1145, when a hospital and a cemetery were built in front of the basilica of Santo Stefano Maggiore. In 1210 a chamber was built to house bones from the cemetery, next to which a church was built in 1269. It was restored for the first time in 1679 by Giovanni Andrea Biffi, who modified the façade and decorated the walls of the ossuary with human skulls and tibiae.
The church was destroyed in 1712; it was replaced by a new edifice designed by Carlo Giuseppe Merlo, featuring a central plan and larger size reflecting the increasing popularity of the ossuary. The new church, connected to the former one by an ambulatory, was dedicated to St. Bernardino of Siena.
The façade was completed in 1776.
8 notes · View notes