Visit Blog
Explore Tumblr blogs with no restrictions, modern design and the best experience.
#jane austen
riptears · 2 days ago
Text
“I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in my life."
The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, Sylvia Plath
226 notes · View notes
maria7potter · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Emma Woodhouse & George Knightley + looks evolution
“We are old friends. I will hear anything you want, about anyone. And I will tell you exactly what I think, as your friend.” “I don't... Friends indeed!”
133 notes · View notes
pristina-nomine · a day ago
Text
I'm halfway through in my Persuasion reread and it’s striking me deeply how much Anne lives on the sidelines. For the whole time I have this picture of a chattering, gossiping crowd and Anne leaned on the wall right behind them, silently listening and watching. She listens closely, and with the greatest interest, has opinions on everything and everyone, but she almost never speaks. I'm pretty sure miss Austen does it by using mainly reported speech for her; as for chapter 13 there were like, four dialogues with her actual words. In chapter 10 she literally overhears Louisa and the captain, and when she’s on the carriage with the Crofts they have a whole conversation without her saying anything. It’s like if Anne was the passive spectator of her own novel. Or perhaps another novel, with say, one of the Musgrove sisters as the protagonist, a younger woman tangled in the typical Austen matchmaking whirlwind.
And on one hand is fascinating how much this makes her an alter ego of the author, even the author herself, since she keeps observing the plot unfolding, making witty comments in her head that other characters can’t hear and never interfering. Here the 2007 adaptation, while far from the perfection of the 1995 one, struck a nerve, in having the whole thing narrated through Anne’s diary. She is the author!
But also it’s heartbreaking. Because actually Anne is just a character who’s given up being a character, a person who’s given up living. She has lost her chance and that’s it, she’s not even young anymore, or pretty, and what else could she do if not sit at the piano and play for herself while everyone else dances their lives on.
46 notes · View notes
apple-salad · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Last week, I posted a reel of a Regency inspired picnic I had in early November with Hime.
These are the outfit pictures to accompany that post. The outfit is of course not historically accurate, but the dress design, while from a 'lolita' brand has clear inspirations from the period. I curled my hair in the late 18th century style for the first time, and I have to say I was really surprised at how much more it instantly made me feel 100x more Austen. The jacket, while designed for lolita, crops short enough that I used it as a sort of spencer here (though I believe a real spencer would be shorter than this). I handmade a chemisette to achieve more Regency daywear authenticity(didn't turn out too great but that's a different story), and hand embellished a straw bonnet. I also dressed up with some slightly different items for a more evening-appropriate look in the second photo. It was really fun to wear and dress in this outfit! I wouldn't give up lolita for the world but I think historic costumes have much of the same spirit and magic!😊
OP: Resplendent Galaxy (Taobao) Jacket: Visible Milky Way (Taobao) Shoes: Kitten’s Ankles (except white shoes, which are Mary Magdalene) Chemisette and bonnet handmade (flower comb attached is from Henriette, a Japanese indie brand), gloves vintage, anything else is probably offbrand
36 notes · View notes
ladybabington · a day ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
emma (2020) + pink
34 notes · View notes
lizzibennet · 2 days ago
Text
i love that scene in emma (2020) where harriet figures out emma’s in love with mr. knightley and emma’s like “harriet, if you believe he loves you, then…” and trails off - i believe for genuine lack of words, but also for genuine acceptance if that were true. she would genuinely want them to be happy. i think she’s genuinely trying her best to be supportive here, even if the situation sucks. but harriet interprets it as her disapproving and says “i refused mr. martin because of you… because you-“ and then cuts herself off, her eyes fill with tears and she runs off. because of course she can’t say emma told her to refuse, can she? she never did outright, although she did everything to make it known she disapproved but say it out loud. and here emma is, genuinely trying her best to not be, like, a bitch, but harriet interprets it as her, once more, saying one thing but meaning another. it truly shows how insidious emma’s meddling has been and how affected harriet was by it… and how upset it makes it her that she was. and in turn how upset it makes emma. it’s all so clear all at once, for both of them. i think that scene is so well done! i love it so much! in this essay i will-
42 notes · View notes
themothermiranda · a day ago
Text
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
“There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”
- Jane Austen
25 notes · View notes
askthejaneaustenheroes · 17 hours ago
Text
Mrs Weston: *sadly* oh, Emma! We are so sorry that Frank played with your expectations!
Emma Woodhouse, that had more of a tentatively friendly connection with Frank Churchill BUT had her plans for Harriet/Frank ruined by the latter: *darkly* he played a very dangerous game, indeed.
32 notes · View notes
july-mulder · 2 days ago
Photo
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Tumblr media
Elizabeth’s white evening dress in the first ball scene requested by anonymous
Pride and Prejudice (1995)
57 notes · View notes
uncahier · 2 days ago
Text
Tumblr media
Stolen from the Sparknotes Insta
24 notes · View notes
synchronousemma · a day ago
Text
3rd December: Emma is quite convinced
Read and comment on WordPress
Read: Vol. 1, ch. 6; pp. 25–26 (“Emma could not feel a doubt” through to “it was spoken with a sort of sighing animation, which had a vast deal of the lover”).
Context
Emma continues her plan to bring Harriet and Mr. Elton together. She is certain that each is appropriately conscious of the merits of the other. For the past several weeks she has been talking up each party to the other, and probably “smooth[ing]” “little matters” whenever the three are in company with each other at Hartfield.
This presumably occurs in late November or early December, as events shortly to be narrated occur in “December” or “the middle of December.”
Note that this write-up consists largely of spoilers.
Readings and Interpretations
No Doubt
Emma’s determination that other people accept her conception of reality as accurate is apparent from the first few lines of this section: Harriet is “more sensible than before” of Mr. Elton’s merits (not, for instance, the more subjective “had a higher opinion than before”); Mr. Elton’s “perception,” not “opinion,” “of the striking improvement of Harriet’s manner” is thought of (Austen [1815], vol. 1, ch. 6; pp. 25, 26; emphasis mine).
On the conversation that opens this section, Linda Bree writes that
Because Emma is so confident about her own judgement, and is plainly so much more intelligent than many people around her, the reader is led into accepting her word for what is happening. […] The first directly related speech of Mr Elton to Emma sets the tone. […] [Quotes from “You have given Miss Smith” to “received from nature.”] In the context of her plans for Mr Elton and Harriet, Emma’s evident assumption that Mr Elton’s words relate to his feelings for Harriet rather than herself is natural enough. And so is the reader’s initial acquiescence with this reading (p. 95).
There is an identifiable disconnect, however, between Emma’s interpretation of Mr. Elton’s “perception” and what we can see evidenced in what he actually says. I am struck by the insistent repetition of the pronoun “you” in the aforementioned speech:
“You have given Miss Smith all that she required,” said he; “you have made her graceful and easy. She was a beautiful creature when she came to you, but, in my opinion, the attractions you have added are infinitely superior to what she received from nature" (ibid., p. 26; emphasis mine).
Mr. Elton then begins to object when Emma pretends modesty in attesting Harriet’s manner to nature rather than her own tutelage. He repeats Emma’s phrase “decision of character,” but with a meaningful difference—“superadded decision of character”—and follows it up with the exclamation “Skilful has been the hand” (ibid., emphasis mine). Emma echoes his syntax: “Great has been the pleasure.” This continues a pattern, apparent in Mr. Knightley’s and Mrs. Weston’s conversation in chapter five, for example, of interlocutors echoing each other’s speech—here, however, rather than evidencing maturity and mutual respect, this repetition-with-a-difference suggests a breakdown in communication.
Emma’s subconscious reckoning of these doubt-inducing circumstances (we know that she is a keen observer, for all that she sometimes turns her observations to poor account) may in fact come through in the first paragraph. The repetition of negatives (she “could not feel a doubt,” she “had no hesitation,” she “had no scruple,” she “could not suppose anything wanting,” it “was not one of the least agreeable proofs”; ibid., pp. 25, 26) and the superfluity of adverbs (“decidedly more sensible,” “remarkably handsome,” “pretty confident,” “quite convinced”1; ibid.) combine to create an overwhelming, flurrying sort of diction that, in Austen, never bodes well.2
Speaking by Rule
Consider this speaking em dash: “’If it were admissible to contradict a lady,’ said the gallant Mr. Elton—” (ibid., p. 26). It suggests, not only that Mr. Elton was interrupted before he could complete his speech, but that this is a speech which needed no completion and which he perhaps never meant to complete. His speech here—as many of his speeches are—is purely formulaic (“A lover, according to the code [of courtship], must admire his ladylove in all she does”; McMaster p. 95). Elton has probably assumed that Emma was speaking formulaically as well—that she affects modesty in response to a compliment as a matter of course, rather than in order to promote a high opinion of Harriet.
Scholarship tends to focus on Emma’s misinterpretations of events, and yet the circumstances that lead Mr. Elton to misinterpret these same situations in another direction are also readily discernible. In fact it is part of the skill with which Austen has constructed her cross-purposes that these incidents can be read from multiple perspectives. As Juliet McMaster notes, “Emma entirely mistranslates Mr. Elton’s secret language. But so does he hers” (p. 95).
Footnotes
Note that “quite” at this time is likely to have meant “thoroughly,” rather than the modern British English sense of “fairly” (which Harper suggests is attested from the mid-19th century). On the syntax of Emma and “could not feel a doubt” as an example of the fact that “Emma’s misinterpretations are reported with non-factives,” see Dry, p. 97ff.
Roger Gard notes that “precise” and “clear speech” serves as a “moral pointer” in Austen (pp. 162, 163).
Discussion Questions
How do Emma’s and Mr. Elton’s syntax and diction suggest their perspectives in this section? What kind of relationship do they appear to have with each other? What can we gather of their respective opinions of Harriet?
Bibliography
Austen, Jane. Emma (Norton Critical Edition). 3rd ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, [1815] 2000.
Bree, Linda. “Style, Structure, Language.” In The Cambridge Companion to Emma, ed. Peter Sabor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2015), pp. 88–104.
Campbell, Teri. “‘Not Handsome Enough’: Faces, Pictures, and Language in Pride and Prejudice.” Persuasions 34 (2012), 207–21.
Dry, Helen. “Syntax and Point of View in Jane Austen’s Emma.” Studies in Romanticism 16.1 (Winter 1977), pp. 87–99. DOI: 10.2307/25600065
Gard, Roger. “Emma’s Choices.” In Jane Austen’s Novels: The Art of Clarity. Avon: Yale University Press (1992), pp. 155–81.
Harper, Douglas. “Etymology of quite.” Online Etymology Dictionary, https://www.etymonline.com/word/quite. Accessed 2 December, 2021.
Jones, Wendy S. “Emma, Gender, and the Mind-Brain.” ELH 75. 2 (Summer 2008), pp. 315–43.
McMaster, Juliet. “The Secret Languages of Emma.” Persuasions 13 (1991), pp. 119–31. Repr. in Jane Austen the Novelist: Essays Past and Present. London: Macmillan Press (1996), pp. 90–105.
19 notes · View notes