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myrtleandberry · 2 days ago
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cd | Being a student leader in medicine ⬇️
This morning, I attended a leadership seminar after our Sunday mass. A classmate asked me if I wanted to run for a position in Medical Student Council (MSC) this coming election and I outright said no. Handling a class for 4 semesters now, with 2 of them being the lead — it’s already too much on my plate. I always have to be on my phone in case I have to disseminate something or one of my coors need help — I always have to be available, even past class hours, not to mention the endless meetings, admin job like weekly sched, google cal updates, classes where I always have to be the speaker — it’s already taking up too much of my time, effort, and energy. So no 😂
Our med school is notorious for being one of the toughest because our academic load is crazy and toxic, hence, I said no. I treasure my breaks, I treasure work-life balance. Being in MSC would take up my breaks because we would be the one organizing the events and coordinating with the doctors, etc — and I don’t want that. I want my breaks. I want time for my skincare, workouts, walks with my dog, journaling, and netflix. 😂 these are the things that make me sane in med school so for this SY, this is enough.
No to more responsibilities, and YES to a sustainable work-life balance.
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a-students-lifebuoy · 2 days ago
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Bring me back to December
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24/1/22 // 07.03
Not me recycling old notes and old sunrises because I have no new content because I was on call all weekend. Work today is going to be Hard because I’m so exhausted from doing 8 days in a row plus on call but at least tomorrow is my day off. Hope you all have lovely days!
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small-bumble-bee · a day ago
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Monday, January 24th 2022
Took a lovely walk this morning, it’s nice to get outside before everyone else does. Kinda needed it after this week, I’m glad that I’ve been getting more steps in too! I went from walking not even a mile to ab 5+ a day! Kinda happy that I kept to that New Years resolution lol
These first weeks of class have been super stressful bc of the different grading styles and how certain profs want assignments submitted… it’s a lot. I hope that it evens out as the weeks go by :’)
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venetianwindow · a day ago
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220124 • 10:35am 🎭
From John Vanbrugh’s play The Relapse. His hellish duos are the best.
Today is the man’s birthday so I thought I’d post something related! Would love to go see some of his lovely buildings soon.
☞ studygram
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museeofmoon · 2 months ago
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𝑺𝒂𝒕𝒖𝒓𝒅𝒂𝒚,20 𝒏𝒐𝒗• it's been a while since I posted so here's Nov spreads, made them with my knife gang so it holds a special place in my heart! (beautiful colour scheme chosen by @randomstudyblr <3) and as for a lil update, I've been mostly busy with exam prep and exchanging motivation since all my irls are quite stressed about the exam as well however I recently watched en: connect and had a lovely time also made a new friend through it! I can't wait to be back here, thank you everyone who left nice words under my hiatus post <3
🎧: 𝑳𝒂𝒔𝒕 𝑾𝒂𝒍𝒕𝒛_𝒕𝒘𝒊𝒄𝒆
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myhoneststudyblr · 9 months ago
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my masterpost | my studygram | ask me anything
[click images for high quality]
[transcript under the cut]
Other advice posts that may be of interest:
How To Study When You Really Don’t Want To
Active Revision Techniques
How To Do Uni Readings
How to Revise BIG Subjects
Common Study Mistakes
Do you have trouble staying focused?
Do you sometimes realise that your mind is wandering only 10 or 15 minutes after sitting down to work?
Do you often read the same page repeatedly without remembering any of it?
Try these strategies to monitor and improve your concentration.
Strategy #1: Take breaks
Humans aren't actually that great at working for really long periods of time and our brain needs rest. So it is really important to remember to take breaks.
When you begin to feel your mind wander and get tired, take a short break. If you know that your concentration span is short, try using the Pomodoro technique!  
The Pomodoro Technique:
Decide on the task to be done
Set a timer for 25 minutes
Work on the task until the timer ends
Take a short 5 minute break
Repeat 4 times and then take a longer 15-30 minute break
Ideas for Breaks:
Do some stretches
Get a snack or a drink
Go for a walk and get some fresh air
Watch an episode of your favourite show or a youtube video
Tidy your desk/room
Strategy #2: Plan your work to maximise concentration
If you have a long stretch of time to study, alternate studying for different courses. For example: if you have three hours to study, spend one hour on each of three different subjects. this way your mind gets variety!
If possible, alternate your study methods. For example: spend one hour reading, the next hour doing math problems and the final hour writing out some notes.
Do your most difficult tasks during *your* best time of day. Your body has natural highs and lows of energy concentration and motivation levels. Figure what these times are for you. Save shopping, housework or fitness activities for times when you're normally tired.
Strategy #3: Use study methods that enhance concentration
Absorbing large amounts of information for long stretches of time can be difficult. Try some of these effective study strategies to help maintain your concentration: 
Verbalise the information instead of reading silently to increase sensory input to the brain: read, write, recite
Teach the material to someone else. This helps you learn it  as well as helping you find weaker areas of understanding
When reading, use techniques such as SQ4R to help you keep focused and improve your retention of information
Make sure to use active revision techniques that will keep you engaged, such as practice questions and flashcards 
Strategy #4: Understand the Health-Concentration Connection
Your physical well-being can affect your concentration.  There can be lots of lifestyle things that are an unsuspected cause of concentration difficulties, such as:
Irregular sleep
(Lack of) Exercise
Eating patterns
Find a regimen that works for you and stick to it to help maintain your brain at its physiological peak.
Knowing how medications might affect your concentration is also important and needs to be taken into consideration when planning work.
Many mental health issues can also affect your concentration and most schools and universities offer various services to support you with this. It is important to make sure that you seek help when you need it.
Strategy #5: Deal with Physical Comfort
Writing Comfort: Your chair should be comfortable with good back support, but not so comfortable that it encourages napping. To help with posture, try raising your laptop/desktop so it is directly in your eye line. Try a keyboard tray to place your keyboard low enough that you don't need to raise your forearms to reach it (this helps avoid carpal tunnel syndrome).
Lighting: Proper lighting is essential to minimise eye strain and fatigue. Make sure you have good ambient lighting (general room lighting, like the ceiling light) because it is particularly hard on your eyes if you work in a dark room with only a desk light or the computer on. Try using a good desk lamp for reading or writing.
Temperature: The temperature should be warm enough that your hands and feet don't get cold, but not so warm that the room gets stuffy and you get sleepy. Layers can be good to control your body temperature as they are easy to get on and off, and will help regulate if you have unreliable heating. 
Strategy #6: Deal with distracting thoughts
There are lots of different ways that you can deal with distracting thoughts - find one that works for you. Here are two possible techniques:
Before: Mind Dump
Before a study session, set a timer for 5 minutes, take a pen and paper, and then write every thought that comes into your head - don't worry about it making sense or being neat. With an empty brain, you can focus on new things, instead of constantly dwelling on past things taking up valuable bandwidth
During: Designate a later time
Reduce the amount of time your mind spends wandering by designating a time to think about a problem. When you notice that you're not concentrating, say to yourself, "I'll think about that at 4 o'clock." Then, at 4 o'clock or whatever time you choose, sit down and think through whatever is bothering you.
Strategy #7: Refocus with the checkmark technique
Keep a piece of paper beside you as you're studying. Whenever you notice that your mind has wandered, put a checkmark on the paper and get back to work.
Making the checkmark is a simple way to help you refocus on your task because the mere act of doing this reminds you to get back to work.
Reviewing the checkmarks can help you determine the time of day when you concentrate the best and show you whether your concentration is improving.
Students report that when they first try this system, they accumulated as many as twenty checkmarks per textbook page. After a couple of weeks, they were down to one or two checkmarks per page. It's therefore a great way to train your brain and see a difference.
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bulletnotestudies · 9 months ago
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As it gets warmer more and more of us are gonna start spending time outside again, so please look after your skin! it’s your protective barrier against everything that doesn’t belong in your body, as well as an organ where numerous important processes take place; and skin cancer isn’t picky - no level of melanin can protect you 100%.
Skin cancer is one of the most dangerous cancers, and it’s on the rise - it’s especially tricky in folks with a darker complexion, as the myth that a dark complexion = enough protection against the sun is still going strong. Most often, malignant melanoma (the super bad, invasive skin cancer) is found too late - so try to monitor your sun moles and look for any changes in shape, size, coloration (get a professional dermatologist’s opinion if you notice a change!); In this way, you can catch any bad changes in time. But the golden rule remains: prevention, PREVENTION, PREVENTION
Wear your SPF, make sure there’s also UVA and UVB protection, if you can, get quality sunglasses (your eyes can get cancer from the sun too!), and please don’t stay in direct sunlight between 10am and at least 4pm - shade is your friend, clothes (covering up) are your best friend :)
Also make sure you’re staying hydrated and getting in all the vitamins and healthy fats, as they play a big role in maintaining and restoring your skin health!
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learnelle · 26 days ago
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Here are my 2021 favourites! Let’s hope that 2022 will be kind to us all ♡
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apricitystudies · 7 months ago
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here's a quick guide on how i proofread and edit my essays as an humanities undergrad! i tend to spend more time on research and editing and much less time on writing and my first drafts are often horrendous, so editing is really important for me :^)
i've also created guides on essay preparation, the 5-paragraph essay, how to research, and how to write essays. you can find all my other masterposts here.
transcript below:
how to proofread essays by apricitystudies
(section one: before beginning) ideally, you should finish writing your essay a few days before the due date so you can step away from it for a while. this helps you to 'forget' what you wrote and allows you to proofread with fresh eyes. after staring at the same piece of writing for so long, your brain tends to fill in the gaps itself as you read, leading you to miss mistakes.
(section two: the key to effective proofreading is to edit in rounds) each round, focus on and attempt to fix a different issue. this requires you to have a little bit more time to edit, which is why you should finish writing early.
(round one: content) argument: does your argument make sense? is it strong? is it logical? evidence: is your research robust? are your points all backed up with sufficient evidence? is every piece of evidence necessary and relevant to your argument? elaboration: is your argument well developed? is every piece of evidence explained, analysed, or critiqued? is the research you provide linked back to and used to support your argument?
(round two: flow) map: have you provided a clear and concise roadmap of your essay? linking: are your paragraphs linked? do the last sentences of each paragraph flow into the next? have you shown how your points are connected? coherence: is your argument logical? is the order of your points easy to follow? is the reader able to see the progression of your argument? TIP: put all the topic sentences of your body paragraphs into one single paragraph. do they make sense together?
(round three: language) vocabulary: have you repeated words/phrases excessively? is your paraphrasing accurate? sentence length: are your sentences overly long? can they be split up? cohesion: does your writing flow? does it sound stilted or clunky? is everything you've written clear? punctuation: are your quotation marks correct? have you used em dashes, colons, and semicolons accurately? small errors: are your spelling and grammar correct?
(round four: format) referencing: are your in-text citations/footnotes correct? is every piece of evidence referenced? style: have you used the correct font size/style? is your line spacing correct? are your paragraphs justified/indented if they're supposed to be? page setup: are your margins set up properly? are your headers/footers/ page numbers correct, if required? bibliography: are your bibliography entries correct? are they in alphabetical order? is the line spacing and indentation correct?
(section three: other tips) 1: change your font to something like comic sans. this makes your brain work harder to read and stops it from skipping words/phrases. 2: print out your essay and go over it with a red pen. mark as if you were a teacher and pick out as many mistakes as you can. 3. read it aloud or use a text-to-speech function. listening to your writing helps you to identify awkward writing and repeated words.
(ending slide: thanks for reading!) this is just my method of proofreading and it might not work for everyone. that being said, i hope it was still helpful! from @apricitystudies
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notebookist · 6 months ago
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infusing some much-needed magic into my life by studying at yale's medical library
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myrtleandberry · 12 hours ago
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cd | Do you play games? 👾 If not, what are your hobbies?
When I was young, I wasn’t really into games because I found them boring. I was more of a bookish kid — you’ll see me in a corner, reading, contented, not a care in the world. And that didn’t change even in college.
When I started medicine though, there is no time to read. Our “free time” is dedicated to doing endless manuals (w/c is really obsolete & useless imo). So I found a new hobby: playing games. Two years ago, it was mobile legends. Just last night, I downloaded a bunch of iPad games that does not require much thinking and so far, I am really enjoying Ragnarok!! It’s easy to play and cute!
There isn’t much to do this week so I’ll just finish all the manuals in microbio, watch the last episode of OBS, and play Ragnarok. 🥳🪄🗡
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academiix · 7 months ago
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How I got a 4.0 first year in college | academiix
Watch the video version on Youtube. 
View my other tips and masterposts.
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acadernia · 5 months ago
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081721. shipping out an etsy order + more journaling — about a month til i'm back on campus and i can't wait :,)
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tulip-studies · a month ago
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25th of december,
marry christmas to those who celebrate today! and for those who don’t I hope you have a great day overall :) I personally do not celebrate christmas on this date, but I love you the holidays and I can’t wait for new year’s!
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venetianwindow · 7 months ago
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How to form habits that last
Click for better quality and zoom in.
Greetings! 💚 Here’s a little something I’ve been working on, which I hope you’ll find useful. :)
All text and graphics are created by me, Sal @blueplaidstudies.
☞ studygram
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diarystudyblr · a month ago
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a vintage book store in Versailles is always a good option💘
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myhoneststudyblr · 9 months ago
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my masterpost | my studygram | ask me anything
[click images for high quality]
[transcript under the cut]
Other advice posts that may be of interest:
How To Study When You Really Don’t Want To
Active Revision Techniques
How To Do Uni Readings
How to Revise BIG Subjects
Non-Stop Studying
The Problem
You find a comfortable spot to study and refuse to move ever again. You don’t even think about taking a break—that would be a waste of time and your due date is super close so you can't afford to do that
The Solution
Whether you’re doing this because you think it’s efficient or because you left everything until the last minute, you’re not going to learn much. Our brains need rest time to process information. Planning ahead is the key here. Instead of focusing only on your deadlines, work backwards and figure out when you need to start working on a project. Take into account how long each part of the work will take you. You’ll feel less overwhelmed and more able to actually learn the material, as opposed to just cramming. If you’re really in a pinch (hey, it happens to everyone), try out the pomodoro method: 25 minutes on, 5 minutes off, with a longer break every 4 circuits. It holds off exhaustion and keeps you feeling refreshed over long periods of heavy work!
Over Highlighting
The Problem
You try to study by reading the textbook, but somehow end up highlighting everything and remembering nothing.
The Solution
Turns out, passively re-reading a textbook is pretty useless. Just because you’re holding a highlighter doesn’t mean you’re actually engaging with the material. Learn how to read actively by taking notes as you read, which will force you to decide what parts of the reading are worth remembering. Come up with practice questions or make flashcards. The more of the 5 senses you use in your studying, the more likely you are to remember the information. If your exam includes an essay portion, think about what kinds of themes your professor might ask about and make some possible outlines. Even if your practice questions don’t actually show up on the exam, you’ll be in the right headspace!
Multitasking 
The Problem
You are studying at the same time that you are watching the newest show on Netflix, texting a friend about what happened last Tuesday and cooking a three-course meal.
The Solution
People are actually really bad at multitasking. While we think we’re focusing on 2 things at once, we’re actually switching between 2 tasks very rapidly, meaning that our brains never have time to fully adjust to working on either one. Unfortunately, the only way around this one is to plan ahead (weird how that keeps cropping up). Make a study schedule ahead of time and figure out which days you’ll devote to which subjects. You’ll be able to process the material more efficiently than you would if your attention was split between tasks, and ultimately you’ll have more confidence in what you’ve learned.
Solo Studying 
The Problem
You only ever study in solitude and refuse to ask anyone else for help.
The Solution
Studying on your own is fine (sometimes even preferable), but having people you can bounce ideas off of can be insanely helpful (even over Zoom!). Convince a friend or family member to let you “teach” them the material—the gaps in your understanding will become more obvious when you try to explain a topic to an uninformed party. If you have no one available, you could even teach to a pet or toy. Most importantly, take advantage of your professors or teachers and contact them if you’re confused about something. You won’t regret it.
Studying Chronologically
The Problem
You sit down to revise for an exam and you look through all of the notes from your class in chronological order.
The Solution
In addition to being a very passive study strategy, it also puts you at risk of running out of time to review the material you learnt most recently, which is often emphasised more heavily on the final exam and can also be some of the most difficult concepts to master – especially for classes like math and languages that increase in difficulty throughout the semester. You will also probably be reviewing information you already know. Instead of studying in chronological order, try studying in priority order, spending the majority of your time on the information that will be most important for you to know for the test.
Memorising, Rather Than Understanding 
The Problem
You know that you need to know facts in an exam so you study by trying to memorise all of the facts from a class, rather than truly understanding the underlying concepts. 
The Solution
Memorising can work well in some classes, especially in earlier stages of school, but it often backfires in more advanced classes. If you’ve memorised a definition but don’t really understand what it means, then as soon as the information is presented in a slightly different format, or you’re asked to apply it to a new type of problem, you will have no idea how to proceed. Rather than memorising the information from your classes, use study strategies that encourage you to understand it. Explaining ideas out loud in your own words, or teaching them to someone else, are great examples of study strategies that promote understanding.
Not Practicing How You’ll Be Tested
The Problem
You have a study method that you use for all of your exams no matter the subject or the format of the exam. 
The Solution
It’s great to have a study method that supports your revision but often they can be limited to specific skills. For example, flashcards might be a great strategy for a test that is mostly multiple-choice and matching questions, but they might be less useful for essays. If you want to be prepared for your exams, you need to make sure that the way you are studying for your test is similar to how you will actually be tested on the material. The best way to do this is by doing practice questions. Numerous studies have shown that students who test themselves on the material they are learning remember the information better than students who do not take practice tests. Practice testing also helps you avoid “illusions of competence”: situations in which you think you know the information better than you do. 
Not Using Active Revision Techniques
The Problem
You study by re-reading over your notes or perhaps rewriting them. 
The Solution
Unfortunately, this approach to studying is not very effective, in large part because it is extremely passive. Students who use this approach will readily admit that they can read over a page of notes and not remember what they have just read! If you don’t remember it right after you’ve read it, how could you possibly hope to answer questions about it on the test? Choosing more active study strategies that require you to engage with the material will enable you to learn the material more effectively and efficiently. This includes: mindmaps, flashcards, past papers, study groups, and many more.
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study-van · 5 months ago
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16.08.2021
Please excuse my chicken handwriting but here are some old mandarin grammar notes. I’m still not super good at mandarin but I’ve taken a proficiency test and I do so much better than I expected!!
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learnelle · a month ago
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Just a friendly reminder that I track #learnelle. Use that tag for any posts you’d like me to see! ♡
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