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Are any of your characters reporters, news anchors, or journalists of some kind? What do they report on? Have they ever seen a major news story unfold right in front of them that they proceeded to report on?
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hood-ex · 2 days ago
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Hi emily how are you? Hope you arr okay!! İ got a few questions for you: What is your dream day job for dick grayson and also does other titans have day jobs and do people know donna troy is troia or kory as starfire? İf i recall right kory was a modeling for donna but i dont really know so i wanted to ask you :)
I'm good thanks!
My dream day job for him is probably one of the two jobs he's actually had in canon: trapeze teacher or museum curator.
These Titan's jobs are gonna draw from around the 80s-90s because otherwise, it gets way too confusing trying to sort things between continuities:
Kory was a model.
Donna was a freelance photographer.
Wally won the lottery and became a millionaire lmao. He later became a police mechanic.
Dick worked with a show at the circus, and then later, he was co-owner of Haly's Circus.
Roy worked with the Drug Enforcement Administration and then became a spy for the CBI. Then he worked as a spy for Checkmate.
Joey's mom had a company called Searchers Inc. and he would work with her as a spy to essentially dig up information. I don't think he worked with her much (or at all ?) when he joined the Titans.
In the 1966 Teen Titans series, Gar was an actor for a bit before the TV series was canceled.
As for identities, Kory and Donna don't wear masks so their identities aren't really private. Kory is easily identifiable as Starfire. She's not trying to hide or be discreet. If she's walking down the street, you'll see people turn their heads to look at her as she walks by. It's the opposite for Donna. People don't recognize her in public (at least, I don't remember them recognizing her.) Donna's name isn't known to the public.
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the-spectre-of-communism · 5 months ago
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might just devote my blog exclusively to the onion headlines
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odinsblog · 5 months ago
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Me, whenever I see businesses complaining about “lazy workers” because they won’t work low paying minimum wage jobs:
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mysharona1987 · 10 days ago
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robertreich · 14 days ago
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[For more analysis and commentary, please join me at robertreich.substack.com]
The General Strike of 2021
On Tuesday, the Labor Department reported that some 4.3 million people had quit their jobs in August. That comes to about 2.9 percent of the workforce -- up from the previous record set in April, of about 4 million people quitting.
All told, about 4 million American workers have been leaving their jobs every month since last spring.
Add this to last Friday’s jobs report showing the number of job openings at a record high. The share of people working or actively looking for work (the labor force participation rate) has dropped to 61.6 percent. Participation for people in their prime working years, defined as 25 to 54 years old, is also down. Over the past year, job openings have increased 62 percent. 
What’s happening? You might say American workers have declared a national general strike until they get better pay and improved working conditions. 
No one calls it a general strike. But in its own disorganized way it’s related to the organized strikes breaking out across the land – Hollywood TV and film crews, John Deere workers, Alabama coal miners, Nabisco workers, Kellogg workers, nurses in California, healthcare workers in Buffalo.
Disorganized or organized, American workers now have bargaining leverage to do better. 
After a year and a half of the pandemic, consumers have pent-up demand for all sorts of goods and services. But employers are finding it hard to fill positions. 
This general strike has nothing to do with the Republican bogeyman of extra unemployment benefits supposedly discouraging people from working. Reminder: The extra benefits ran out on Labor Day.
Renewed fears of the Delta variant of COVID may play some role. But it can’t be the major factor. With most adults now vaccinated, rates of hospitalizations and deaths are way down. 
Childcare is a problem for many workers, to be sure. But lack of affordable childcare has been a problem for decades. It can’t be the reason for the general strike. 
I believe that the reluctance of workers to return to or remain in their old jobs is mostly because they’re fed up. Some have retired early. Others have found ways to make ends meet other than remain in jobs they abhor. Many just don’t want to return to backbreaking or boring low-wage shit jobs. 
The media and most economists measure the economy’s success by the number of jobs it creates, while ignoring the *quality* of those jobs. That’s a huge oversight. 
Years ago, when I was Secretary of Labor, I kept meeting working people all over the country who had full-time work but complained that their jobs paid too little and had few benefits, or were unsafe, or required lengthy or unpredictable hours. Many said their employers treated them badly, harassed them, and did not respect them.
Since then, these complaints have only grown louder, according to polls. For many, the pandemic was the last straw. Workers are burned out, fed up, fried. In the wake of so much hardship, illness and death during the past year, they’re not going to take it anymore.
To lure workers back, employers are raising wages and offering other inducements. Average earnings rose 19 cents an hour in September and are up more than $1 an hour – or 4.6 percent -- over the last year.
Clearly, that’s not enough.
Corporate America wants to frame this as a “labor shortage.” Wrong. What’s really going on is more accurately described as a living-wage shortage, a hazard pay shortage, a childcare shortage, a paid sick leave shortage, and a health care shortage.Unless *these* shortages are rectified, many Americans won’t return to work anytime soon. I say it’s about time.
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gahdamnpunk · a year ago
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PAY THEM WHAT THEY DESERVE AND NOT JUST DURING QUARANTINE ! ! !
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whetstonefires · a year ago
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One of my favorite things is modern adaptations that leave people with the same careers they had in the original material, because unless you’re a cop or a doctor that practically never happens.
Irene Adler’s an opera singer. We still have those! They don’t have the same subtext exactly, but nothing is going to because we aren’t the Victorians. She could continue to be an opera singer. I have never seen this happen.
Jonathan Harker can still be in real estate. That’s a job people have. A modern story that still involves Dracula contacting his firm to help him purchase property sounds amazing actually.
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cutepoop · 3 months ago
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I really love this. If there's one good thing that stemmed from the pandemic, it's the way it has highlighted the true value of the worker. Particularly those who fill the lower wage positions. Oh, Tommy Burgerflipper isn't necessary and shouldn't make enough money to pay rent? Things at the restaurant are pretty shaky now that no one is filling his position, huh? Sally Officlady still has to feed her family, pandemic or no.
People returning to work are being a lot more choosy, and it's showing in the help wanted ads. Positions that once held ridiculous requirements while offering mediocre pay are not only adding incentives, but are now attainable for a lot more of us. Even the entry level jobs are offering higher wages and better benefits. Now is the time, babies. Apply for the job you think you're not quite qualified for. Go for your dream job. Maybe you'll get it.
These fuckers are desperate for bodies. Get that money.
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grumpytrans · 6 days ago
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working in public service is like i don't want to be here today. i do want to help people. i hate everyone who comes thru this door. i love a select few. why do people act the way that they do. these people are human too. im having a bad day. i am essential to this place because i am the backbone to continuing society
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macrolit · 5 months ago
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I couldn’t get myself to read the want ads. The thought of sitting in front of a man behind a desk and telling him that I wanted a job, that I was qualified for a job, was too much for me. Frankly, I was horrified by life, at what a man had to do simply in order to eat, sleep, and keep himself clothed.
Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) German-American author, poet
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thatwasuzi · 9 months ago
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“You can find another job”
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Shutdown your small business because of COVID while Big Box corporations make money hand over fist.
"You can find another job”
Let those same small businesses burn to the ground for a summer because you're too chickenshit to acknowledge, let alone address the police reform this country desperately needs to keep up the guise of controlled opposition.
"You can find another job"
Shut down a pipeline that has a direct effect on both the jobs for tens of thousands of tradespeople and help keeps a modern necessity cheaper for everyone.
"You can find another job"
Promote a misguided new minimum wage that the same big box stores can easily absorb while not passing up the excuse to automate and layoff thousands more of lower earners.
"You can find another job"
That same minimum wage that will absolutely wreck smaller businesses nationwide because they now can't afford to employ the same number of people.
"You can find another job"
Fuck. You.
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mysharona1987 · 4 months ago
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robertreich · 5 days ago
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Don't believe corporate America's "labor shortage" bullshit. This is an unofficial general strike.
For the first time in years, American workers have enough bargaining leverage to demand better working conditions and higher wages -- and are refusing to work until they get them.
Here’s where that leverage comes from. After a year and a half of the pandemic, consumers have pent-up demand for all sorts of goods and services. But employers are finding it hard to fill positions to meet that demand. 
The most recent jobs report showed the number of job openings at a record high. The share of people working or looking for work has dropped to a near-record low 61.6 percent. In August, 4.3 million Americans quit their jobs, the highest quit rate since 2000.
Republicans have been claiming for months that people aren’t getting back to work because of federal unemployment benefits. Rubbish. 
The number of people working or looking for work dropped in September -- after the extra benefits ran out on Labor Day.
The reluctance of people to work doesn’t have anything to do with unemployment benefits. It has everything to do with workers being fed up.
Some have retired early. Others have found ways to make ends meet other than a job they hate. Many just don’t want to return to backbreaking or mind-numbing low-wage jobs. 
In the wake of so much hardship, illness and death, peoples’ priorities have shifted.
The media and most economists measure the economy’s success by the number of jobs it creates, while ignoring the quality of those jobs. Just look at the media coverage of the September jobs report: The New York Times emphasized “weak” job growth. For CNN, it was “another disappointment.” 
But when I was Secretary of Labor, I met with working people all over the country who complained that their jobs paid too little and had few benefits, or were unsafe, or required unwieldy hours. Many said their employers treated them badly.
With the pandemic, it’s even worse. That’s why, in addition to all the people who aren’t returning to work, we’re also seeing dozens of organized strikes around the country -- 10,000 John Deere workers, 1,400 Kellogg workers, over 1,000 Alabama coal miners, and thousands of others.
Not to mention the unauthorized strikes and walkouts since the pandemic began, like the mostly Black sanitation workers in Pittsburgh or the Amazon warehouse workers in Staten Island. In order to lure workers back, employers are now raising wages and offering other incentives. Average earnings rose 19 cents an hour in September and are up more than $1 an hour over the last year. But clearly, that’s not enough to get workers back.
Corporate America is trying to frame this as a “labor shortage.” 
But what’s really happening is more accurately described as a living-wage shortage, a hazard pay shortage, a childcare shortage, a paid sick leave shortage, and a health care shortage.
Unless these shortages are rectified, this unofficial general strike will continue. I say it’s about time.
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gahdamnpunk · a year ago
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He’s offering $2k PER ADULT not per household and $1k for everyone below 18
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